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  • Parekh, Vishal
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Parekh, Vishal
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    A Fair Distribution of Global Biocapacity: The Potential in Swedish Environmental Policy2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 300 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Humanity’s detrimental impacts on the Earth’s ecosystems have been studied extensively, and these impacts’ negative consequences across societal groups, nations, and generations, have garnered much attention, from the scientific community as well as from civil society, where the attention often has been directed at how unfair the distribution of these environmental burdens is. The fairness of the distribution of global environmental benefits, however, has seen much less study, especially when it comes to the implementation of such concerns for fairness in environmental policy.

    In support of the research project Beyond GDP-growth, this thesis has centered on a Swedish context, and has focused on the term “biocapacity”, which is a quantifiable measure of many environmental benefits, and in the thesis is defined as the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to regenerate the biological materials extracted by humans. The thesis has then aimed to determine the current potential for the implementation of a fair distribution of global biocapacity in Swedish environmental policy, mainly by way of a series of interviews with individuals engaged in different forms of Swedish environmental work – from different levels of government, to civil society and centers of scientific research.

    It is concluded that the current potential for the implementation of a fair distribution of global biocapacity in Swedish environmental policy is primarily hindered by the seeming lack of a relevant discourse on the matter. Without such a discourse, a lack of public understanding of the subject is deemed to cause poor public support for any potential policies promoting a fair distribution of global biocapacity. It is suggested that a relevant and effective discourse is best achieved through transparent trade practices, and by the active participation of scientific experts and other actors outside of the political system. Furthermore, the thesis discusses the usefulness of the term “biocapacity” in this context, concluding that more research is needed, while identifying the main point of contention as what the term is intuitively understood to mean, as well as whether or not it can be used as a means to achieve a focused public discourse on the fair distribution of environmental goods.

  • Rosander, Lilly
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Rosander, Lilly
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Implementering av Agenda 2030 i Regeringskansliet: Samverkan i en värld av barriärer2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In September 2015 world leaders agreed upon a framework and 17 global sustainable development goals – the UN’s 2030 Agenda  (A / RES / 70/1, 2015) – with its associated financial- and climate agenda. This thesis examines how the Government Offices of Sweden implements the new global goals for sustainability. The purpose of the study is ultimately to be a help in future implementation as potential barriers are identified and alternative approaches can be suggested. The study may contribute to the research on sustainability policies, as it combines theories of implementation and ecological governance in a way that is suggested in ecological governance.

    Through this qualitative study the Government Office’s process for the implementation of Agenda 2030 was examined. It emerges that the Government Offices, to some extent, has changed the traditional way of implementation by assigning the Treasury Department responsibility. However, there are still a number of barriers that, if they were addressed, could improve the implementation of Agenda 2030 and thus be beneficial for achieving the global targets and reducing society's negative environmental impact.

  • Public defence: 2017-01-26 10:00 V3, Stockholm
    Ghasemifard, Fatemeh
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering. KTH.
    Ghasemifard, Fatemeh
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering. KTH.
    Remote contact-free reconstruction of currents in two-dimensional parallel conductors2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, the theory of the remote contact-free reconstruction of currents in two-dimensional parallel conductors is investigated. The motivation of this study is finding a complement technique to measurement transformers which are the well-established devices to measure currents in power transmission lines. This technique would provide the possibility of measuring currents at different locations of a power system, as well as, at different frequencies.

     

    Remote contact-free determination of currents is an electromagnetic inverse source problem in which the currents are reconstructed from the magnetic field data collected by a set of sensors located in the vicinity of the conductors. Since the sensors are not too close to the conductors, the main challenge is the effect of the disturbance fields produced by the external sources in the measurement.

     

    In the case that the external sources produce three-dimensional disturbance fields, the magnetic field due to the external sources is expressed as a truncated expansion of the spherical harmonics and both the currents in the conductors and the expansion coefficients are determined by applying the least square method. To overcome the ill-posedness of the problem, the functional to be minimized is augmented by a Tikhonov regularization term that penalizes unphysical solutions introduced by the expansion coefficients.

     

    Finally, the problem of selecting a limited number of optimal sensor positions among a set of predetermined sensor positions is considered. Using the relaxation method, this optimization problem is changed to a convex optimization problem which can be readily solved using the CVX package.

  • Public defence: 2017-02-02 10:00 KTH - room B2, Stockholm
    Samuelsson, Peter
    KTH.
    Samuelsson, Peter
    KTH.
    Management of technology in the process industries:  Matching market and machine2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The process industries span multiple industrial sectors and constitute a substantial part of the entire manufacturing industry. Since companies belonging to this family of industries are often very asset intensive, their ability to respond to changes is often limited in the short term.

    The adaptation of the capabilities of existing processes, and conversely finding products and market segments to match the production system capabilities, are an important part of product- and market development activities in the process industry. The importance to companies in the process industry of having a well-articulated manufacturing strategy congruent with the business strategy is second to none. However, to facilitate manufacturing strategy developments, it is essential to start with an improved characterization and understanding of the material transformation system.

    To that end an extensive set of variables was developed and related measures and scales were defined. The resulting configuration model, focusing on company generic process capabilities in the process industries, is to be regarded as a conceptual taxonomy and as a proposition available for further testing. The usability of the model was subsequently assessed using “mini-cases” in the forestry industry, where the respondents confirmed that the company’s overall strategy could benefit from this kind of platform as a possible avenue to follow.

    The model was deployed as an instrument in the profiling of company material transformation systems to facilitate the further development of companies' functional and business strategies. The use of company-generic production capabilities was studied in three case companies representing the mineral, food and steel industries. The model was found by the respondents to be usable as a knowledge platform to develop production strategies. In the final analysis of the research results, a new concept emerged called “production capability configuration":

    A process-industrial company’s alignment of its generic production capabilities in the areas of raw materials, process technology and products to improve the consistency among the variable elements that define operations and improve the congruence between operations and its environment.

    From the perspective of value creation and capture, firms must be able to manufacture products in a competitive cost structure within the framework of a proper business model. By using the configuration model, the relationship between manufacturing and innovation activities has been studied in the previously mentioned three case studies.

    In many cases the gap in capability appears as a limitation in the production system, requiring development efforts and sometimes investments to overcome. This is illustrated with two examples from the steel industry, where development efforts of the production system capabilities are initiated to better match the market demands. One example is the increase the volume- and product flexibility of an existing stainless steel melt shop, resulting in a proposed oblong Argon Oxygen Decarburisation (AOD) converter configuration that was subsequently verified using water modelling. The second example is from a carbon steel mill, where the target was to increase the raw material- and volume flexibility of another melt shop, by modifying the capabilities of the Electric Arc Furnace (EAF). Enabling EAF technologies are further described and evaluated using operational data and engineering type of estimates. 

  • Isernia, Alberto
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Isernia, Alberto
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Innovative AMR based magnetometer for space application: Simulation and Characterization of a multilayer solution2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the recent years, the space technology trend was pointing towards the miniaturization of all its components in order to achieve a smaller and lightweight satellite with low power and low noise components. A possible solution to this request can be given by the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) based sensors which present good miniaturizability and low power consumption. The objective of this thesis is to study and characterize a Planar Hall E ect Bridge (PHEB) AMR sensor in order to understand if this type of technology can meet the strict performance requirements imposed for a space application. One of the techniques used to improve the detectivity of our sensor was to increase the thickness of the FM layer in order to reduce the resistance of the device which required to used a double bias layer of AFM material in order to avoid demagnetization e ects inside the FM layer. An other advanced technological solution used to reduce the resistance of the devices is to stack multilayer of AFM-FM materials in order to obtain a multilayer sensor composed of different sensors working in parallel. The main focus on this thesis was to perform multiphysics simulations and measurement characterization of those two solutions and to integrate the sensor on a PCB in order to demonstrate the feasibility to use.

  • Public defence: 2017-02-17 10:00 Kollegiesalen
    Anderson, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Anderson, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Amine Transaminases in Multi-Step One-Pot Reactions2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Amine transaminases are enzymes that catalyze the mild and selective formation of primary amines, which are useful building blocks for biologically active compounds and natural products. In order to make the production of these kinds of compounds more efficient from both a practical and an environmental point of view, amine transaminases were incorporated into multi-step one-pot reactions. With this kind of methodology there is no need for isolation of intermediates, and thus unnecessary work-up steps can be omitted and formation of waste is prevented. Amine transaminases were successfully combined with other enzymes for multi-step synthesis of valuable products: With ketoreductases all four diastereomers of a 1,3-amino alcohol could be obtained, and the use of a lipase allowed for the synthesis of natural products in the form of capsaicinoids. Amine transaminases were also successfully combined with metal catalysts based on palladium or copper. This methodology allowed for the amination of alcohols and the synthesis of chiral amines such as the pharmaceutical compound Rivastigmine. These examples show that the use of amine transaminases in multi-step one-pot reactions is possible, and hopefully this concept can be further developed and applied to make industrial processes more sustainable and efficient in the future.

  • Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Från med-arbetarskap till med-ledarskap2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • Ghasemifard, Fatemeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering. KTH.
    Ghasemifard, Fatemeh
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering. KTH.
    Norgren, Martin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Contact-free Measurement of Currents inTwo-dimensional Parallel Conductors Using the Green Identity Approach2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Green identity approach is used to reconstructcurrents in very long parallel conductors above the groundfrom magnetic field data measured at some points under theconductors. By assuming that the conductor positions are known,this method can be used for contact-free measurement of currentsin transmission lines in power system. This method gives thepossibility of measuring high-frequency currents which cannotbe measured with current transformers.

  • Brodin, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Brodin, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Working with emotions: Recommending subjective labels to music tracks using machine learning2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Curated music collection is a growing field as a result of the freedom and supply that streaming music services like Spotify provide us with. To be able to categorize music tracks based on subjective core values in a scalable manner, this thesis has explored if recommending such labels are possible through machine learning.

    When analysing 2464 tracks with one or more of the 22 different core values a profile was built up for each track by features from three different categories: editorial, cultural and acoustic. When classifying the tracks into core values different methods of multi-label classification were explored. By combining five different transformation approaches with three base classifiers and using two algorithm adaptations a total of 17 different configurations were constructed. The different configu- rations were evaluated with multiple measurements including (but not limited to) Hamming Loss, Ranking Loss, One error, F1 score, exact match and both training and testing time.

    The results showed that the problem transformation algorithm Label Powerset together with Sequential minimal optimization outper- formed the other configurations. We also found promising results for neural networks, something that should be investigated further in the future.

  • Xie, Tian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory.
    Xie, Tian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory.
    Knowledge discovery and machinelearning for capacity optimizationof Automatic Milking RotarySystem2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Dairy farming as one part of agriculture has thousands of year’s history. The increasingdemands of dairy products and the rapid development of technology bring dairyfarming tremendous changes. Started by first hand milking, dairy farming goes throughvacuum bucket milking, pipeline milking, and now parlors milking. The automatic andtechnical milking system provided farmer with high-efficiency milking, effective herdmanagement and above all booming income.DeLaval Automatic Milking Rotary (AMRTM) is the world’s leading automatic milkingrotary system. It presents an ultimate combination of technology and machinerywhich brings dairy farming with significant benefits. AMRTM technical milking capacityis 90 cows per hour. However, constrained by farm management, cow’s condition andsystem configuration, the actual capacity is lower than technical value. In this thesis, anoptimization system is designed to analyze and improve AMRTM performance. The researchis focusing on cow behavior and AMRTM robot timeout. Through applying knowledgediscover from database (KDD), building machine learning cow behavior predictionsystem and developing modeling methods for system simulation, the optimizing solutionsare proposed and validated.

  • Mahdavi, Mernaz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Mahdavi, Mernaz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Sociala krav vid offentliga upphandlingar: -att ställa sociala krav inom byggbranschen med fokus på mångfald2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Du, Rong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory.
    Du, Rong
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory.
    Fischione, Carlo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory.
    Xiao, Ming
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory.
    Poster: On the Immortality of Wireless Sensor Networks by Wireless Energy Transfer - A Node Deployment Perspective2017In: Proceedings of International Conference on Embedded Wireless Systems and Networks, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can be substantially extended by transferring energy wirelessly to the sensor nodes. In this poster, a wireless energy transfer (WET) enabled WSN is presented, where a base station transfers energy wirelessly to the sensor nodes that are deployed in several regions of interest, to supply them with energy to sense and to upload data. The WSN lifetime can be extended by deploying redundant sensor nodes, which allows the implementation of duty-cycling mechanisms to reduce nodes' energy consumption. In this context, a problem on sensor node deployment naturally arises, where one needs to determine how many sensor nodes to deploy in each region such that the total number of nodes is minimized, and the WSN is immortal. The problem is formulated as an integer optimization, whose solution is challenging due to the binary decision variables and a non-linear constraint. A greedy-based algorithm is proposed to achieve the optimal solution of such deployment problem. It is argued  that such scheme can be used in monitoring systems in smart cities, such as smart buildings and water lines.

  • Afzal, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Afzal, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    An analytical calculation of the Jacobian matrix for 3D friction contact model applied to turbine blade shroud contact2016In: Computers & structures, ISSN 0045-7949, E-ISSN 1879-2243, Vol. 177, 204-217 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An analytical expression is formulated to compute the Jacobian matrix for 3D friction contact modeling that efficiently evaluates the matrix while computing the friction contact forces in the time domain by means of the alternate frequency time domain approach. The developed expression is successfully used for the calculation of the friction damping on a turbine blade with shroud contact interface having an arbitrary 3D relative displacement. The analytical expression drastically reduces the computation time of the Jacobian matrix with respect to the classical finite difference method, with many points at the contact interface. Therefore, it also significantly reduces the overall computation time for the solution of the equations of motion, since the formulation of the Jacobian matrix is the most time consuming step in solving the large set of nonlinear algebraic equations when a finite difference approach is employed. The equations of motion are formulated in the frequency domain using the multiharmonic balance method to accurately capture the nonlinear contact forces and displacements. Moreover, the equations of motion of the full turbine blade model are reduced to a single sector model by exploiting the concept of cyclic symmetry boundary condition for a periodic structure. Implementation of the developed scheme in solving the equations of motion is proved to be effective and significant reduction in time is achieved without loss of accuracy.

  • Pham, Cong-Toan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Pham, Cong-Toan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Månsson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    On the development of an equivalent electrical circuit model for energy storages for smart grid applications2016In: Innovative Smart Grid Technologies - Asia (ISGT-Asia), 2016 IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy storages are indispensable in regard to the development of the smart grid with increasing fluctuating power generation. A valid choice of energy storages is important to ensure the efficiency of the system and selected application. This study describes an initial approach to model energy storage systems as an equivalent circuit. This model is capable of analyzing different load scenarios and simulating the storage's behavior in dependence of three circuit components, i.e., resistance, inductance, and capacitance. These model parameters define the storage system and can be used to test existing storage devices or find an optimal setting for selected load conditions.The model is tested in a load scenario with a residential building supported by photovoltaic generation.

  • Olofsson, Per Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Per Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics.
    Microscopy-based single-cell in vitro assays for NK cell function in 2-D and 3-D2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural killer (NK) cells are effector cells of the innate immune system that are responsible for mediating cellular cytotoxicity against virally infected or neoplastically transformed cells. NK cell subsets are defined by their expression of certain cell-surface markers, and are usually related to activation and developmental status.

    However, how distinct NK cell phenotypes correlate with behavior in NK-target interactions is less widely characterized. There is therefore a need to study NK cell behavior down at the single-cell level. One aim of this thesis is to approach methods that quantitatively describe these single-cell-level behavioral differences of NK cells.

    Additionally, the ability of NK cells to migrate through the extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment is crucial for NK cell trafficking and immune surveillance. Traditional imaging studies of NK cell migration and cytotoxicity do not properly reproduce the structural and mechanical cues that shape the migratory response of NK cells in vivo.

    Therefore, it is desirable to implement 3-D in vitro migration and killing assays that better mimic in vivo conditions. Another aim of this thesis is to develop a microwell-based assay for 3-D time-lapse imaging of NK cell migration and cytotoxicity.

    Using a newly developed single-cell imaging and screening assay, we trap small populations of NK and target cells inside microwells, where they are imaged over extended periods of time. We have performed experiments on resting, IL-2-activated, educated, and non-educated NK cells and quantified their migration behavior and cytotoxicity. One major discovery was that a small population of NK cells mediate a majority of the cytotoxicity directed against target cells. A particularly cytotoxic group of cells, termed serial killers, displayed faster and more effective cytotoxicity. Serial killers were more prevalent in IL-2-activated and educated NK cells, but were also present in a small fraction of resting and non-educated NK cells. IL-2-activated and educated NK cells displayed more dynamic migration behavior than resting and non-educated NK cells. Additionally, IL-2-activated and educated NK cells spent more time in NK–target cell conjugates and post-conjugation attachment than resting and non-educated NK cells.

    To more closely approximate in vivo conditions, we have combined our microwell assay with an interstitial ECM-like matrix. The microwells allow for long-term imaging of NK–target cell interactions within a confined 3-D volume. NK cells were tracked and interactions with target cells were scored for duration and outcome. The developed microwell-based assay is suitable for 3-D time-lapse imaging of NK cell migration and cytotoxicity. As it allows for experiments with human cells, it could be used as a complement to in vivo imaging.

    We have quantified NK cell behavioral heterogeneity and developed tools that can be used to further study and elucidate differences in the behavior of single immune cells. These tools advance current methods for single-cell analysis, which will likely play an even more important role in the study of immune responses in the future.

  • Public defence: 2017-02-03 13:00 Kollegiesalen, Stockholm
    Bülow, William
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Bülow, William
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Unfit to live among others: Essays on the ethics of imprisonment2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis provides an ethical analysis of imprisonment as a mode of punishment. Consisting in an introduction and four papers the thesis addresses several important questions concerning imprisonment from a number of different perspectives and theoretical starting points. One overall conclusion of this thesis is that imprisonment, as a mode of punishment, deserves more attention from moral and legal philosophers. It is also concluded that a more complete ethical assessment of prison conditions and prison management requires a broader focus. It must include an explicit discussion of both how imprisonment directly affects prison inmates and its negative side-effects on third parties. Another conclusion is that ethical discussions on prison conditions should not be too easily reduced to a question about how harsh or lenient is should be.

    Paper 1 argues that prisoners have a right to privacy. It is argued that respect for inmates’ privacy is related to respect for them as moral agents. Consequently, respect for inmates’ privacy is called for by different established philosophical theories about the justification of legal punishment. Practical implications of this argument are discussed and it is argued that invasion of privacy should be minimized to the greatest extent possible, without compromising other important values or the rights to safety and security. It is also proposed that respect for privacy should be part of the objective of creating and upholding a secure environment.

    Paper 2 discusses whether the collateral harm of imprisonment to the children and other close family members of prison inmates may give rise to special moral obligations towards them. Several collateral harms, including decreased psychological wellbeing, financial costs, loss of economic opportunities, and intrusion and control over their private lives, are identified. Two perspectives in moral philosophy, consequentialism and deontology, are then applied in order to assess whether these harms are permissible. It is argued that from either perspective it is hard to defend the claim that allowing for these harms are morally permissible. Consequently, imprisonment should be used only as a last resort. Where it is deemed necessary, it gives rise to special moral obligations. Using the notion of residual obligation, these obligations are then categorized and clarified.

    Paper 3 focuses on an argument that has figured in the philosophical debate on felon disenfranchisement. This argument states that as a matter of democratic self-determination, a legitimate democratic collective has the collective right to decide whether to disenfranchise felons as a way of defining their political identity. Yet, such a collective’s right to self-determination is limited, since the choice to disenfranchise anyone must be connected to normative considerations of political significance. This paper defends this argument against three charges that has been raised to it. In doing so it also explores under what circumstances felon disenfranchisement can be permissible.

    Paper 4 explores the question of whether prison inmates suffering from ADHD should be administered psychopharmacological intervention (methylphenidate) for their condition. The theoretical starting point for the discussion is the communicative theory of punishment, which understands criminal punishment   as a form of secular penance. Viewed through the lens of the communicative theory it is argued that the provision of pharmacological treatment to offenders with ADHD need not necessarily be conceived of as an alternative to punishment, but as an aid to achieving the penological ends of secular penance. Thus, in this view offenders diagnosed with ADHD should have the option to undergo pharmacological treatment.

  • Boyer, Romain
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Optimization and Systems Theory.
    Boyer, Romain
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Optimization and Systems Theory.
    Study and Industrialization of Optimization Methods for Low-Thrust Orbital Maneuvers2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, the electric propulsion (low-thrust propulsion) is becoming more and more important in the aerospace industry. This technology allows to consume less propellant and consequently to build lighter satellites than with the chemical propulsion (high-thrust propulsion). The aim of this Master Thesis is to use direct optimization methods (collocation and shootings) in order to solve low-thrust trajectory problems. The focused transfers are the orbit raising maneuvers. Either the fuel consumption or the duration of the transfer can be optimized with respect to some mission constraints. The orbital maneuver is modeled as an optimal control problem. Then, a module has been conceived and implemented in Java in order to transform any optimal control problem into a non-linear problem, which can be solved with a numerical solver. Different test cases with low-thrust propulsion (change in semi-major axis, change in eccentricity, change in inclination…) are efficiently solved with this module. The found results validate direct methods as a suitable way to optimize low-thrust orbital transfers.

  • Lindeberg, Tony
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Lindeberg, Tony
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Discrete approximations of affine Gaussian receptive fields2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a theory for discretizing the affine Gaussian scale-space concept so that scale-space properties hold also for the discrete implementation.

    Two ways of discretizing spatial smoothing with affine Gaussian kernels are presented: (i) by solving semi-discretized affine diffusion equation as derived by necessity from the requirement of a semi-group structure over a continuum of scale parameters as parameterized by a family of spatial covariance matrices and obeying non-creation of new structures from any finer to any coarser scale as formalized by the requirement of non-enhancement of local extrema and (ii) a set of parameterized 3x3-kernels as derived from an additional discretization of the above theory along the scale direction and with the parameters of the kernels having a direct interpretation in terms of the covariance matrix of the composed discrete smoothing operation.

    We show how convolutions with the first family of kernels can be implemented in terms of a closed form expression for the Fourier transform and analyse how a remaining degree of freedom in the theory can be explored to ensure a positive discretization and optionally also achieve higher-order discrete approximation of the angular dependency of the shapes of the affine Gaussian kernels.

    We do also show how discrete directional derivative approximations can be efficiently implemented to approximate affine Gaussian derivatives as constituting a canonical model for receptive fields over a purely spatial image domain and with close relations to receptive fields in biological vision.

  • Magnusson, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Magnusson, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Web Application for Travel Diary Annotation and Methods for Trip Destination and Purpose Inference2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Public defence: 2017-02-10 09:00 Air and Fire at Science for Life Laboratory, Solna
    Vickovic, Sanja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Vickovic, Sanja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Transcriptome-wide analysis in cells and tissues2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High-throughput sequencing has greatly influenced the amount of data produced and biological questions asked and answered. Sequencing approaches have also enabled rapid development of related technological fields such as single-cell and spatially resolved expression profiling. The introductory parts of this thesis give an overview of the basic molecular and technological apparatus needed to analyse the transcriptome in cells and tissues. This is succeeded by a summary of present investigations that report recent advancements in RNA profiling.

    RNA integrity needs to be preserved for accurate gene expression analysis. A method providing a low-cost alternative for RNA preservation was reported. Namely, a low concentration of buffered formaldehyde was used for fixation of human cell lines and peripheral blood cells (Paper I). The results from bulk RNA sequencing confirmed gene expression was not negatively impacted with the preservation procedure (r2>0.88) and that long-term storage of such samples was possible (r2=0.95). However, it is important to note that a small population of cells overexpressing a limited amount of genes can skew bulk gene expression analyses making them sufficient only in carefully designed studies. Therefore, gene expression should be investigated at the single cell resolution when possible. A method for high-throughput single cell expression profiling termed microarrayed single-cell sequencing was developed (Paper II). The method incorporated fluorescence-activated cell sorting, sample deposition and profiling of thousands of barcoded single cells in one reaction. After sample attachment to a barcoded array, a high-resolution image was taken which linked the position of each array barcode sequence to each individual deposited cell. The cDNA synthesis efficiency was estimated at 17.3% while detecting 27,427 transcripts per cell on average. Additionally, spatially resolved analysis is important in cell differentiation, organ development and pathological changes. Current methods are limited in terms of throughput, cost and time. For that reason, the spatial transcriptomics method was developed (Paper III). Here, the barcoded microarray was used to obtain spatially resolved expression profiles from tissue sections using the same imaging principle. The mouse olfactory bulb was profiled on a whole-transcriptome scale and the results showed that the expression correlated well (r2=0.94-0.97) as compared to bulk RNA sequencing. The method was 6.9% efficient, reported signal diffusion at ~2 μm and accurately deconvoluted layer-specific transcripts in an unbiased manner. Lastly, the spatial transcriptomics concept was applied to profile human breast tumours in three dimensions (Paper IV). Unbiased clustering revealed previously un-annotated regions and classified them as parts of the immune system, providing a detailed view into complex interactions and crosstalk in the whole tissue volume. Spatial tumour classification divulged that certain parts of the tumour clearly classified as other subtypes as compared to bulk analysis providing useful data for current practice diagnostics.

    The last part of the thesis discusses a look towards the future, how the presented methods could be used, improved upon or combined in translational research.

  • Public defence: 2017-01-20 13:00 FA32, Stockholm
    Riber Marklund, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Reactor Technology.
    Riber Marklund, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Reactor Technology.
    Passive acoustic leak detection in energy conversion systems of sodium fast reactors2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reaching the goals of Generation IV nuclear power is challenging. However, no less than six reactor concepts have been identified as capable of fulfilling the demands. Among these, the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR), probably represents the most mature technology as about 20 SFR plants have been operated to this day.

     

    One design-specific issue of the SFR is the risk of leak and sodium-water reaction inside a steam generator. Standard monitoring is based on hydrogen detection, resulting in high sensitivity but slow response. The alternative of acoustic leak detection methods has been studied since the 1970s since they are able to respond much faster. Demonstrating low false alarm rate while detecting the fairly weak and possibly unknown acoustic signals of leaks has however proven to be difficult.

     

    Today, the CEA performs R&D, notably within the scope of the ASTRID project, with the aim of eliminating the sodium-water reaction risk. This is achieved by a Brayton cycle, using a nitrogen turbine and compact sodium-nitrogen heat exchangers. In case of a leak in this system, the low solubility of nitrogen in sodium and the high pressure in the tertiary circuit would increase the secondary pressure, locally deteriorate performance and possibly result in harmful hydrodynamic effects. Together with the risks of a potential gas leak over to the reactor, this motivates the use of leak detection also for this design.

     

    This thesis concerns passive acoustic leak detection, primarily for a SFR sodium-nitrogen heat exchanger, arguing that this method is suitable based on experiments, numerical simulations and studies on algorithms. The word “passive” here refers to a system that does not send out any signals, but rather records the noise of the plant and detects leaks as changes in this signal. The thesis covers experiments on normal operation and leak-simulating setups as well as machine-learning based detection methods intended to be of interest also for change detection in general.

  • Vickovic, Sanja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Vickovic, Sanja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Three-dimensional whole transcriptome analysis of tissue for classification of breast cancer. Submitted manuscript.2017Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • Riber Marklund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Reactor Technology.
    Riber Marklund, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Reactor Technology.
    Anglart, Henryk
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Reactor Technology.
    Michel, Frederic
    Demonstration of an improved passive acoustic fault detection method on recordings from the Phénix steam generator operating at full power2017In: Annals of Nuclear Energy, ISSN 0306-4549, E-ISSN 1873-2100, Vol. 101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hidden Markov model method proposed earlier for passive acoustic leak detection in sodium fast reactor systems has been improved in order to clarify how to set all free model parameters and to allow smaller amounts of training data. The method is based on training the model on known background noise only and optimizing its free model parameters by a parametric study of detection performance for synthetic noises superposed onto the same background. This means that the method is not assuming any knowledge on the noise to be detected and may be used as a general fault detection method, even if the application envisaged here is leak detection for sodium fast reactors. Using recordings of background noise as well as from argon injection tests performed at full power in the Phénix sodium fast reactor plant, it is estimated that the resulting method will detect leak-like deviations from the background noise with a detection delay of a few seconds, a false alarm rate close to 10-8 per second and at signal-to-noise ratio conditions at least corresponding to an additive signal at −10 dB. The method is one-channel, i.e. using input from one single acoustic sensor only.

  • Artho, Cyrille
    Artho, Cyrille
    Finding Faults in Multi-threaded Programs2001Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 300 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Rasouli, Aisan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Rasouli, Aisan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Viberg, Elin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Underhållet i en vindkraftspark - En utredning av behov och kostnad2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Güclü, Kemal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Güclü, Kemal
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    S Ahmed, Ali
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Elnätet i en vindkraftpark2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Giesecke, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Giesecke, Oskar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Karlsson, Rikard
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Vindkraftpark på Öland - En förstudie om elproduktion och lönsamhet2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Nikoletic, Mileta
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Nikoletic, Mileta
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Recommender systems - a smarter shopping solution2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Levin-Svenson, Patrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Levin-Svenson, Patrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Synchronization in a radio based price tag system2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Strömberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Strömberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Modulation and demodulation for radio based pricing2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Nordell, Benjamin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Nordell, Benjamin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Lindblom, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Source coding for radio based pricing2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Isaksson Palmqvist, Mia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Isaksson Palmqvist, Mia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Detection and tracking by camera networks2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Sjöholm, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Sjöholm, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Biel, Martin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Automatic control of a quadrotor in the smart building2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Li, Vladimir
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Li, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Zafirakis, Zacharias
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Networked control of unmanned air vehicles2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Karlberg, Filip
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Karlberg, Filip
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Non-linear behaviour of nanofibrillar cellulose foams2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) is a cellulose-based material that can be used to create porous foams. The material has several advantages over various synthetic polymers that can be used to create foams as NFC is both abundant and biodegradable.

    Both the microstructure of the NFC foam and the material properties of the NFC affect the foam’s mechanical properties, with the material properties being difficult to extract experimentally due to difficulties associated with performing micro-scale experiments. This work has been aimed at investigating whether it is possible to indirectly determine the material properties by using X-ray microtomography to reconstruct the microstructure of an NFC foam for use in finite element (FE) simulations.

    Through the use of different thresholding levels, multiple foam structures with similar geometries but different porosities can be obtained. These were then be used to obtain the macroscopic material properties through FE simulations of the uniaxial compression response of these geometries. The data from these simulations used to fit a power law relation equivalent to the classical scaling laws for foams. The relation was then used to determine the yield stress and Young’s modulus of the NFC material in the cell walls by extrapolating it to the known porosity of a foam used in a previous laboratory experiment and the measured material properties of this foam.

  • Athari, Kayvan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Athari, Kayvan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Networked control of autonomous ground vehicles2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Forsgren, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Forsgren, Erik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Kollberg, Christian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Evaluation of on-line topological coverage path planning for mobile cleaning robots2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Andersson, Sofie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Andersson, Sofie
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Carlsson, Hannes
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Brain activity and healthcare in the smart home2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Karlsson, Jesper
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Karlsson, Jesper
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Okano, Toshiaki
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Brain activity sensors and health care systems adapted to fall detection and medicine distribution2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Sai Reddy Mallangi, Siva
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Sai Reddy Mallangi, Siva
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    PID in building control and automation2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Morin, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Morin, Oskar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Haddad, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    PID in building control and automation2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Gomez Limia, Guillermo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Gomez Limia, Guillermo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Real-time scheduling in smart building2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Azoidou, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Azoidou, Eva
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Jakobsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Real-time communications in smart buildings2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Piehl-Fridqvist, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Piehl-Fridqvist, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Reliable wireless remote data acquisition with packet prioritization on the NI myRIO2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Yousuff, Razu
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Yousuff, Razu
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Network security2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Hemlin Billström, Adam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Hemlin Billström, Adam
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Åkerberg, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Remote navigation and image transfer2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Hasbum, Moises
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Hasbum, Moises
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Plasma characterization of a high power impulse magnetron experiment2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Sjöström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Sjöström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Plasma processing for titanium dioxide coatings2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Johansson, Christian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Johansson, Christian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Particle-surface collisions for fusion relevant materials2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Mossberg, Ivar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Mossberg, Ivar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Voghera, Jacob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Elektromikroskopianalys av aerosolpartiklar från atmosfären2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis