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Berglund, L. & Burgert, I. (2018). Bioinspired Wood Nanotechnology for Functional Materials. Advanced Materials, 30(19), Article ID 1704285.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioinspired Wood Nanotechnology for Functional Materials
2018 (English)In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 30, no 19, article id 1704285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is a challenging task to realize the vision of hierarchically structured nanomaterials for large-scale applications. Herein, the biomaterial wood as a large-scale biotemplate for functionalization at multiple scales is discussed, to provide an increased property range to this renewable and CO2-storing bioresource, which is available at low cost and in large quantities. The Progress Report reviews the emerging field of functional wood materials in view of the specific features of the structural template and novel nanotechnological approaches for the development of wood-polymer composites and wood-mineral hybrids for advanced property profiles and new functions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH, 2018
Keywords
bioinspiration, functional materials, nanotechnology, structural hierarchy, wood
National Category
Polymer Chemistry Composite Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228261 (URN)10.1002/adma.201704285 (DOI)000431616700004 ()29468736 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042279348 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180523

Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-05-23Bibliographically approved
Medina, L. & Berglund, L. (2018). Brick-and-mortar biocomposites from cellulose nanofibrils and clay nanoplatelets. Paper presented at 255th National Meeting and Exposition of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS) - Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water, MAR 18-22, 2018, New Orleans, LA. Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, 255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brick-and-mortar biocomposites from cellulose nanofibrils and clay nanoplatelets
2018 (English)In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2018
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232280 (URN)000435539906237 ()
Conference
255th National Meeting and Exposition of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS) - Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water, MAR 18-22, 2018, New Orleans, LA
Note

QC 20180719

Available from: 2018-07-19 Created: 2018-07-19 Last updated: 2018-07-19Bibliographically approved
Koivurova, M., Vasileva, E., Li, Y., Berglund, L. & Popov, S. (2018). Complete spatial coherence characterization of quasi-random laser emission from dye doped transparent wood. Optics Express, 26(10), 13474-13482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complete spatial coherence characterization of quasi-random laser emission from dye doped transparent wood
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2018 (English)In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 13474-13482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report on the experimental determination of the complete two coordinate spatial coherence function of light emitted by a quasi-random laser, implemented on recently introduced dye-doped transparent wood. The spatial coherence was measured by means of a double grating interferometer, which has some advantages over the standard Young's interferometer. Analysis of the spatial coherence reveals that emission from such a material can be considered as a superposition of several spatial modes produced by individual emitters within semi-ordered scattering medium. The overall degree of coherence, (gamma)over-bar, for this quasi-random laser was found to be 0.16 +/- 0.01, having possible applications in speckle free laser imaging and illumination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OPTICAL SOC AMER, 2018
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231223 (URN)10.1364/OE.26.013474 (DOI)000432457600117 ()29801372 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047074022 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180628

Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
Chen, P., Terenzi, C., Furo, I., Berglund, L. & Wohlert, J. (2018). Hydration-Dependent Dynamical Modes in Xyloglucan from Molecular Dynamics Simulation of C-13 NMR Relaxation Times and Their Distributions. Biomacromolecules, 19(7), 2567-2579
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydration-Dependent Dynamical Modes in Xyloglucan from Molecular Dynamics Simulation of C-13 NMR Relaxation Times and Their Distributions
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2018 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 2567-2579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Macromolecular dynamics in biological systems, which play a crucial role for biomolecular function and activity at ambient temperature, depend strongly on moisture content. Yet, a generally accepted quantitative model of hydration-dependent phenomena based on local relaxation and diffusive dynamics of both polymer and its adsorbed water is still missing. In this work, atomistic-scale spatial distributions of motional modes are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated xyloglucan (XG). These are shown to reproduce experimental hydration-dependent C-13 NMR longitudinal relaxation times (T-1) at room temperature, and relevant features of their broad distributions, which are indicative of locally heterogeneous polymer reorientational dynamics. At low hydration, the self-diffusion behavior of water shows that water molecules are confined to particular locations in the randomly aggregated XG network while the average polymer segmental mobility remains low. Upon increasing water content, the hydration network becomes mobile and fully accessible for individual water molecules, and the motion of hydrated XG segments becomes faster. Yet, the polymer network retains a heterogeneous gel-like structure even at the highest level of hydration. We show that the observed distribution of relaxations times arises from the spatial heterogeneity of chain mobility that in turn is a result of heterogeneous distribution of water-chain and chain chain interactions. Our findings contribute to the picture of hydration-dependent dynamics in other macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, and synthetic polymers, and hold important implications for the mechanical properties of polysaccharide matrixes in plants and plant-based materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232788 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.8b00191 (DOI)000438470800020 ()29688710 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046395682 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20180803

Available from: 2018-08-03 Created: 2018-08-03 Last updated: 2018-08-03Bibliographically approved
Li, Y., Vasileva, E., Sychugov, I., Popov, S. & Berglund, L. (2018). Optically Transparent Wood: Recent Progress, Opportunities, and Challenges. Advanced Optical Materials, 6(14), Article ID 1800059.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optically Transparent Wood: Recent Progress, Opportunities, and Challenges
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2018 (English)In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, Vol. 6, no 14, article id 1800059Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transparent wood is an emerging load-bearing material reinvented from natural wood scaffolds with added light management functionalities. Such material shows promising properties for buildings and related structural applications, including its renewable and abundant origin, interesting optical properties, outstanding mechanical performance, low density, low thermal conductivity, and great potential for multifunctionalization. In this study, a detailed summary of recent progress on the transparent wood research topic is presented. Remaining questions and challenges related to transparent wood preparation, optical property measurements, and transparent wood modification and applications are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2018
Keywords
biocomposites, optical property measurement, photonic devices, smart buildings, transparent wood, wood modification
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232765 (URN)10.1002/adom.201800059 (DOI)000439490700008 ()2-s2.0-85046829217 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 742733Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-4421
Note

QC 20180802

Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Lo Re, G., Spinella, S., Boujemaoui, A., Vilaseca, F., Larsson, P. T., Adås, F. & Berglund, L. (2018). Poly(ε-caprolactone) Biocomposites Based on Acetylated Cellulose Fibers and Wet Compounding for Improved Mechanical Performance. ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 5(6), 6753-6760
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poly(ε-caprolactone) Biocomposites Based on Acetylated Cellulose Fibers and Wet Compounding for Improved Mechanical Performance
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2018 (English)In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 6753-6760Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) is a ductile thermoplastic, which is biodegradable in the marine environment. Limitations include low strength, petroleum-based origin, and comparably high cost. Cellulose fiber reinforcement is therefore of interest although uniform fiber dispersion is a challenge. In this study, a one-step wet compounding is proposed to validate a sustainable and feasible method to improve the dispersion of the cellulose fibers in hydrophobic polymer matrix as PCL, which showed to be insensitive to the presence of the water during the processing. A comparison between unmodified and acetylated cellulosic wood fibers is made to further assess the net effect of the wet feeding and chemical modification on the biocomposites properties, and the influence of acetylation on fiber structure is reported (ATR-FTIR, XRD). Effects of processing on nano fibrillation, shortening, and dispersion of the cellulose fibers are assessed as well as on PCL molar mass. Mechanical testing, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, FE-SEM, and X-ray tomography is used to characterize composites. With the addition of 20 wt % cellulosic fibers, the Young's modulus increased from 240 MPa (neat PCL) to 1850 MPa for the biocomposites produced by using the wet feeding strategy, compared to 690 MPa showed for the biocomposites produced using dry feeling. A wet feeding of acetylated cellulosic fibers allowed even a greater increase, with an additional 46% and 248% increase of the ultimate strength and Young's modulus, when compared to wet feeding of the unmodified pulp, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
National Category
Polymer Technologies
Research subject
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225425 (URN)10.1021/acssuschemeng.8b00551 (DOI)000431927500117 ()2-s2.0-85046751578 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180531

Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Herrera, M., Thitiwutthisakul, K., Yang, X., Rujitanaroj, P.-o., Rojas, R. & Berglund, L. (2018). Preparation and evaluation of high-lignin content cellulose nanofibrils from eucalyptus pulp. Cellulose (London), 25(5), 3121-3133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparation and evaluation of high-lignin content cellulose nanofibrils from eucalyptus pulp
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2018 (English)In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 3121-3133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High Klason lignin content (23 wt%) cellulose nanofibrils (LCNF) were successfully isolated from eucalyptus pulp through catalyzed chemical oxidation, followed by high-pressure homogenization. LCNFs had a diameter of ca. 13 nm according to AFM evaluation. Dense films were obtained through vacuum filtration (nanopaper) and subjected to different drying methods. When drying under heat and mild vacuum (93 degrees C, 95 kPa) a higher water contact angle, lower roughness and oxygen transmission rate were observed, compared to those drying at room temperature under compression conditions. DSC experiments showed difference in signals associated to T-g of LCNF compared to CNF produced from spruce bleached pulp through enzymatic pre-treatment. The LCNF-based nanopaper showed mechanical properties slightly lower than for those made from cellulose nanofibrils, yet with increased hydrophobicity. In summary, the high-lignin content cellulose nanofibrils proved to be a suitable material for the production of low oxygen permeability nanopaper, with chemical composition close to native wood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Lignocellulose nanofibrils, Oxygen barrier, Eucalyptus
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228268 (URN)10.1007/s10570-018-1764-9 (DOI)000431788000028 ()2-s2.0-85045090612 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180522

Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved
Yang, X., Berthold, F. & Berglund, L. (2018). Preserving Cellulose Structure: Delignified Wood Fibers for Paper Structures of High Strength and Transparency. Biomacromolecules, 19(7), 3020-3029
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preserving Cellulose Structure: Delignified Wood Fibers for Paper Structures of High Strength and Transparency
2018 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 3020-3029Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To expand the use of renewable materials, paper products with superior mechanical and optical properties are needed. Although beating, bleaching, and additives are known to improve industrially produced Kraft pulp papers, properties are limited by the quality of the fibers. While the use of nanocellulose has been shown to significantly increase paper properties, the current cost associated with their production has limited their industrial relevance. Here, using a simple mild peracetic acid (PAA) delignification process on spruce, we produce hemicellulose-rich holocellulose fibers (28.8 wt %) with high intrinsic strength (1200 MPa for fibers with microfibrillar angle smaller than 10 degrees). We show that PAA treatment causes less cellulose/hemicellulose degradation and better preserves cellulose nanostructure in comparison to conventional Kraft pulping. High-density holocellulose papers with superior mechanical properties (Young's modulus of 18 GPa and ultimate strength of 195 MPa) are manufactured using a water-based hot-pressing process, without the use of beating or additives. We propose that the preserved hemicelluloses act as "glue" in the interfiber region, improving both mechanical and optical properties of papers. Holocellulose fibers may be affordable and applicable candidates for making special paper/composites where high mechanical performance and/or optical transmittance are of interest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232789 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.8b00585 (DOI)000438470800065 ()29757614 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047085277 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20180803

Available from: 2018-08-03 Created: 2018-08-03 Last updated: 2018-08-03Bibliographically approved
Hajian, A., Fu, Q. & Berglund, L. (2018). Recyclable and superelastic aerogels based on carbon nanotubes and carboxymethyl cellulose. Composites Science And Technology, 159, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recyclable and superelastic aerogels based on carbon nanotubes and carboxymethyl cellulose
2018 (English)In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 159, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Deformation mechanisms are largely unknown for superelastic carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels, and this hampers materials design efforts. The CNT network in the cell walls is typically crosslinked or connected by a thermoset polymer phase. In order to create a recyclable superelastic aerogel, unmodified single or multi-walled CNTs were dispersed in water by adding to aqueous carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) solution. Directional freeze-drying was used to form honeycombs with cell walls of random-in-the-plane CNTs in CMC matrix. Cell wall morphology and porosity were studied and related to CNT type and content, as well as elastic or plastic buckling of the cell walls under deformation. CMC acts as a physical crosslinker for the CNTs in a porous cell wall. Aerogel structure and properties were characterized before and after recycling. The conductivity of the composite aerogel with a density of 10 kg/m3, 99% porosity and 50 wt % single-walled CNT exceeds 0.5 S/cm. The potential of these superelastic and conductive aerogels for applications such as mechanoresponsive materials was examined in cyclic conductivity tests at different strains. This opens a new route for recyclable superelastic CNT composite aerogels, avoiding material loss, chemical treatment or addition of other components.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Polymers; Nanocomposites; CNT networks; Conductivity; Recycle
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Nano Technology
Research subject
Materials Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-223432 (URN)10.1016/j.compscitech.2018.01.002 (DOI)000436214100001 ()2-s2.0-85042350204 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180308

Available from: 2018-02-21 Created: 2018-02-21 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved
Ansari, F., Ding, Y., Berglund, L. & Dauskardt, R. H. (2018). Toward Sustainable Multifunctional Coatings Containing Nanocellulose in a Hybrid Glass Matrix. ACS Nano, 12(6), 5495-5503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward Sustainable Multifunctional Coatings Containing Nanocellulose in a Hybrid Glass Matrix
2018 (English)In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 5495-5503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report on a sustainable route to protective nanocomposite coatings, where one of the components, nanocellulose fibrils, is derived from trees and the glass matrix is an inexpensive sol-gel organic-inorganic hybrid of zirconium alkoxide and an epoxy-functionalized silane. The hydrophilic nature of the colloidal nanocellulose fibrils is exploited to obtain a homogeneous one-pot suspension of the nanocellulose in the aqueous sol-gel matrix precursors solution. The mixture is then sprayed to form nano composite coatings of a well-dispersed, random in-plane nano cellulose fibril network in a continuous organic inorganic glass matrix phase. The nanocellulose incorporation in the sol-gel matrix resulted in nanostructured composites with marked effects on salient coating properties including optical transmittance, hardness, fracture energy, and water contact angle. The particular role of the nanocellulose fibrils on coating fracture properties, important for coating reliability, was analyzed and discussed in terms of fibril morphology, molecular matrix, and nanocellulose/matrix interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2018
Keywords
cellulose nanofibril (CNF), cellulose nanocrystal (CNC), sol-gel, spray deposition, fracture energy, inorganic precursors, flexible
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232261 (URN)10.1021/acsnano.8b01057 (DOI)000436910200046 ()29882658 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049065940 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180718

Available from: 2018-07-18 Created: 2018-07-18 Last updated: 2018-07-18Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5818-2378

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