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Farahani, S. K., Vilaplana, F., Ruda, M., Hansson, P. & Wågberg, L. (2020). Influence of Solubility on the Adsorption of Different Xyloglucan Fractions at Cellulose-Water Interfaces. Biomacromolecules, 21(2), 772-782
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of Solubility on the Adsorption of Different Xyloglucan Fractions at Cellulose-Water Interfaces
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2020 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 772-782Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Xylogucan (XG) fractions with different molar masses were prepared while preserving the natural structure of the XG. The solubility of the fractions was investigated using light scattering, chromatography, and microscopy techniques. The conformational changes of the XG molecules and their association and phase separation were investigated together with concentration and molar mass changes. The knowledge gained was then applied to investigate the interaction of different XG fractions at cellulose model surfaces using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. The results indicate that there is a cluster formation and phase separation of the XG molecules at the cellulose/water interface induced by the increase in XG concentration close to the surface. Concomitantly, the adsorption regimes are altered for the XG fractions depending on the solubility properties, indicating that the insolubility, association, and phase separation of XGs in aqueous media affect their interaction with cellulose. The study is of vital importance for improving the functionality of sustainable materials made from xyloglucan/cellulose natural composites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2020
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-269473 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.9b01465 (DOI)000513091100049 ()31790572 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077719348 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20200310

Available from: 2020-03-10 Created: 2020-03-10 Last updated: 2020-03-10Bibliographically approved
Dahlström, C., Duran, V. L., Keene, S. T., Salleo, A., Norgren, M. & Wågberg, L. (2020). Ion conductivity through TEMPO-mediated oxidated and periodate oxidated cellulose membranes. Carbohydrate Polymers, 233, Article ID 115829.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ion conductivity through TEMPO-mediated oxidated and periodate oxidated cellulose membranes
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2020 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 233, article id 115829Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose in different forms is increasingly used due to sustainability aspects. Even though cellulose itself is an isolating material, it might affect ion transport in electronic applications. This effect is important to understand for instance in the design of cellulose-based supercapacitors. To test the ion conductivity through membranes made from cellulose nanofibril (CNF) materials, different electrolytes chosen with respect to the Hofmeister series were studied. The CNF samples were oxidised to three different surface charge levels via 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), and a second batch was further cross-linked by periodate oxidation to increase wet strength and stability. The outcome showed that the CNF pre-treatment and choice of electrolyte are both crucial to the ion conductivity through the membranes. Significant specific ion effects were observed for the TEMPO-oxidised CNF. Periodate oxidated CNF showed low ion conductivity for all electrolytes tested due to an inhibited swelling caused by the crosslinking reaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2020
Keywords
Cellulose nanofibrils, Ion conductivity, TEMPO oxidation, Periodate oxidation, Structure-property relationship, Specific ion effects
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-269440 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2020.115829 (DOI)000513914400009 ()32059883 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077916225 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20200316

Available from: 2020-03-16 Created: 2020-03-16 Last updated: 2020-03-16Bibliographically approved
Francon, H., Benselfelt, T., Granberg, H., Larsson, P. A. & Wågberg, L. (2019). 3D printable nanocellulose aerogels via a green crosslinking approach and a facile evaporation procedure. Paper presented at National Meeting of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS), MAR 31-APR 04, 2019, Orlando, FL. Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, 257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D printable nanocellulose aerogels via a green crosslinking approach and a facile evaporation procedure
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2019 (English)In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257628 (URN)000478860502770 ()
Conference
National Meeting of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS), MAR 31-APR 04, 2019, Orlando, FL
Note

QC 20190902

Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Senf, D., Ruprecht, C., Farahani, S. K., Wågberg, L. & Pfrengle, F. (2019). Chemoenzymatic synthesis of artificial xylan polysaccharides with defined substitution patterns. Paper presented at National Meeting of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS), MAR 31-APR 04, 2019, Orlando, FL. Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, 257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemoenzymatic synthesis of artificial xylan polysaccharides with defined substitution patterns
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2019 (English)In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
National Category
Polymer Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257631 (URN)000478860502716 ()
Conference
National Meeting of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS), MAR 31-APR 04, 2019, Orlando, FL
Note

QC 20190902

Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Nordenström, M., Nystrom, G., Fall, A. & Wågberg, L. (2019). Colloidal gels and glasses from nanocelluloses. Paper presented at National Meeting of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS), MAR 31-APR 04, 2019, Orlando, FL. Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, 257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Colloidal gels and glasses from nanocelluloses
2019 (English)In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
National Category
Polymer Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257625 (URN)000478860502456 ()
Conference
National Meeting of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS), MAR 31-APR 04, 2019, Orlando, FL
Note

QC 20190918

Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
Belaineh, D., Andreasen, J. W., Palisaitis, J., Malti, A., Hakansson, K., Wågberg, L., . . . Berggren, M. (2019). Controlling the Organization of PEDOT:PSS on Cellulose Structures. ACS APPLIED POLYMER MATERIALS, 1(9), 2342-2351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Controlling the Organization of PEDOT:PSS on Cellulose Structures
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2019 (English)In: ACS APPLIED POLYMER MATERIALS, ISSN 2637-6105, Vol. 1, no 9, p. 2342-2351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Composites of biopolymers and conducting polymers are emerging as promising candidates for a green technological future and are actively being explored in various applications, such as in energy storage, bioelectronics, and thermoelectrics. While the device characteristics of these composites have been actively investigated, there is limited knowledge concerning the fundamental intracomponent interactions and the modes of molecular structuring. Here, by use of cellulose and poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), it is shown that the chemical and structural makeup of the surfaces of the composite components are critical factors that determine the materials organization at relevant dimensions. AFM, TEM, and GIVVAXS measurements show that when mixed with cellulose nanofibrils, PEDOT:PSS organizes into continuous nanosized beadlike structures with an average diameter of 13 nm on the nanofibrils. In contrast, when PEDOT:PSS is blended with molecular cellulose, a phase-segregated conducting network morphology is reached, with a distinctly relatively lower electric conductivity. These results provide insight into the mechanisms of PEDOT:PSS crystallization and may have significant implications for the design of conducting biopolymer composites for a vast array of applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
Keywords
nanocomposites, biomaterials, PEDOT, nanotechnology, energy materials, cellulose
National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-261326 (URN)10.1021/acsapm.9b00444 (DOI)000486361400010 ()
Note

QC 20191007

Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Erlandsson, J., Francon, H., Marais, A., Granberg, H. & Wågberg, L. (2019). Cross-Linked and Shapeable Porous 3D Substrates from Freeze-Linked Cellulose Nanofibrils. Paper presented at Symposium on Rational Design of Multifunctional Renewable-Resourced Materials held during the ACS National Meeting, AUG 19-23, 2018, Boston, MA. Biomacromolecules, 20(2), 728-737
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-Linked and Shapeable Porous 3D Substrates from Freeze-Linked Cellulose Nanofibrils
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2019 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 728-737Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chemically cross-linked highly porous nano cellulose aerogels with complex shapes have been prepared using a freeze-linking procedure that avoids common post activation of cross-linking reactions and freeze-drying. The aerogel shapes ranged from simple geometrical three-dimensional bodies to swirls and solenoids. This was achieved by molding or extruding a periodate oxidized cellulose nanofibril (CNF) dispersion prior to chemical cross-linking in a regular freezer or by reshaping an already prepared aerogel by plasticizing the structure in water followed by reshaping and locking the aerogel into its new shape. The new shapes were most likely retained by new cross-links formed between CNFs brought into contact by the deformation during reshaping. This self-healing ability to form new bonds after plasticization and redrying also contributed to the mechanical resilience of the aerogels, allowing them to be cyclically deformed in the dry state, reswollen with water, and redried with good retention of mechanical integrity. Furthermore, by exploiting the shapeability and available inner structure of the aerogels, a solenoid-shaped aerogel with all surfaces coated with a thin film of conducting polypyrrole was able to produce a magnetic field inside the solenoid, demonstrating electromagnetic properties. Furthermore, by biomimicking the porous interior and stiff exterior of the beak of a toucan bird, a functionalized aerogel was created by applying a 300 mu m thick stiff wax coating on its molded external surfaces. This composite material displayed a 10-times higher elastic modulus compared to that of the plain aerogel without drastically increasing the density. These examples show that it is possible to combine advanced shaping with functionalization of both the inner structure and the surface of the aerogels, radically extending the possible use of CNF aerogels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-245946 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.8b01412 (DOI)000458937200016 ()30394086 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057560598 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Symposium on Rational Design of Multifunctional Renewable-Resourced Materials held during the ACS National Meeting, AUG 19-23, 2018, Boston, MA
Note

QC 20190312

Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Farahani, S. K., Escalante, A., Toriz, G., Vilaplana, F., Gatenholm, P., Hansson, P. & Wågberg, L. (2019). Experimental and Theoretical Evaluation of the Solubility/Insolubility Spruce Xylan (Arabino Glucuronoxylan). Biomacromolecules, 20(3), 1263-1270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental and Theoretical Evaluation of the Solubility/Insolubility Spruce Xylan (Arabino Glucuronoxylan)
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2019 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 1263-1270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The molecular solubility of softwood arabinoglucuronoxylan (AGX) has been thoroughly investigated, and it has been shown that the chemical and physical structures of the extracted hemicellulose are not significantly influenced by different purification steps, but a transient molecular solubility of AGX was observed in aqueous media at low concentrations (1 g/L) when the dissolved macromolecules had a hydrodynamic diameter of up to 10 nm. A phase separation was detected when the concentration was increased to 15 g/L leading to an association of the smaller molecules into fractal structures with a considerably larger diameter, even though the dispersions were still transparent to ocular inspection. Dynamic Light Scattering and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy showed dimensions in the range of 1000 nm. The phase separation of the sample was further characterized by estimating the χ-interaction parameter of AGX in water using the Flory-Huggins theory, and the results supported that water is a poor solvent for AGX. This behavior is crucial when films and hydrogels based on these biopolymers are made, since the association will dramatically affect barrier and mechanical properties of films made from these materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-248093 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.8b01686 (DOI)000461270500013 ()30689362 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061537168 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190429

Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Benselfelt, T., Nordenström, M., Lindstrom, S. B. & Wågberg, L. (2019). Explaining the Exceptional Wet Integrity of Transparent Cellulose Nanofibril Films in the Presence of Multivalent Ions-Suitable Substrates for Biointerfaces. Advanced Materials Interfaces, 6(13), Article ID 1900333.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Explaining the Exceptional Wet Integrity of Transparent Cellulose Nanofibril Films in the Presence of Multivalent Ions-Suitable Substrates for Biointerfaces
2019 (English)In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 6, no 13, article id 1900333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) assemble into water-resilient materials in the presence of multivalent counter-ions. The essential mechanisms behind these assemblies are ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects. A network model shows that the interfibril attraction indirectly influences the wet modulus by a fourth power relationship to the solidity of the network (E-w proportional to phi(4)). Ions that induce both ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects significantly reduce the swelling of the films, and due to the nonlinear relationship dramatically increase the wet modulus. Herein, this network model is used to explain the elastoplastic behavior of wet films of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-oxidized, carboxymethylated, and phosphorylated CNFs in the presence of different counter-ions. The main findings are that the aspect ratio of the CNFs influences the ductility of the assemblies, that the bivalency of phosphorylate ligands probably limits the formation of interfibril complexes with divalent ions, and that a higher charge density increases the friction between fibrils by increasing the short-range attraction from ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects. These findings can be used to rationally design CNF materials for a variety of applications where wet strength, ductility, and transparency are important, such as biomaterials or substrates for bioelectronics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
cellulose nanofibrils, ion-ion correlation, multivalent ions, network, specific ion effects
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257579 (URN)10.1002/admi.201900333 (DOI)000478635700019 ()2-s2.0-85065451547 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190920

Available from: 2019-09-20 Created: 2019-09-20 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Reid, M. S., Erlandsson, J. & Wågberg, L. (2019). Incorporation of cellulose nanocrystals into polyamide nanocomposites with controlled architecture via interfacial polymerization. Paper presented at National Meeting of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS), MAR 31-APR 04, 2019, Orlando, FL. Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, 257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incorporation of cellulose nanocrystals into polyamide nanocomposites with controlled architecture via interfacial polymerization
2019 (English)In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257610 (URN)000478860502418 ()
Conference
National Meeting of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS), MAR 31-APR 04, 2019, Orlando, FL
Note

QC 20190918

Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8622-0386

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