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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Kann, V. & Ekeberg, Ö. (2018). Student based program development. In: ITiCSE 2018 Proceedings of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education: . Paper presented at 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE 2018, Larnaca, Cyprus, 2 July 2018 through 4 July 2018 (pp. 379-379). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student based program development
2018 (English)In: ITiCSE 2018 Proceedings of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 379-379Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this work is to investigate a new method of involving all students in the continued development of an educational program. Using this method, we have obtained a list of well-scrutinized suggestions for improvement that have support among the students, and that we can start to implement. We have also saved a large pool of suggestions that could be used in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Program development, Quality, Student involvement
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-234112 (URN)10.1145/3197091.3205818 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052025842 (Scopus ID)9781450357074 (ISBN)
Conference
23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE 2018, Larnaca, Cyprus, 2 July 2018 through 4 July 2018
Note

QC 20180903

Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Natesan, D., Saxena, N., Ekeberg, Ö. & Sane, S. P. (2016). Airflow mediated antennal positioning in flying hawkmoths. Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Integrative-and-Comparative-Biology (SICB), JAN 03-07, 2016, Portland, OR. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 56, E159-E159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Airflow mediated antennal positioning in flying hawkmoths
2016 (English)In: Integrative and Comparative Biology, ISSN 1540-7063, E-ISSN 1557-7023, Vol. 56, p. E159-E159Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Natl Ctr Biol Sci, Bangalore, Karnataka, India. KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.: , 2016
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-185650 (URN)000372457600634 ()
Conference
Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Integrative-and-Comparative-Biology (SICB), JAN 03-07, 2016, Portland, OR
Note

QC 20160427

Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ekeberg, Ö., Fransén, E., Hellgren Kotaleski, J., Herman, P., Kumar, A., Lansner, A. & Lindeberg, T. (2016). Computational Brain Science at CST, CSC, KTH. KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computational Brain Science at CST, CSC, KTH
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2016 (English)Other, Policy document (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Mission and Vision - Computational Brain Science Lab at CST, CSC, KTH

The scientific mission of the Computational Brain Science Lab at CSC is to be at the forefront of mathematical modelling, quantitative analysis and mechanistic understanding of brain function. We perform research on (i) computational modelling of biological brain function and on (ii) developing theory, algorithms and software for building computer systems that can perform brain-like functions. Our research answers scientific questions and develops methods in these fields. We integrate results from our science-driven brain research into our work on brain-like algorithms and likewise use theoretical results about artificial brain-like functions as hypotheses for biological brain research.

Our research on biological brain function includes sensory perception (vision, hearing, olfaction, pain), cognition (action selection, memory, learning) and motor control at different levels of biological detail (molecular, cellular, network) and mathematical/functional description. Methods development for investigating biological brain function and its dynamics as well as dysfunction comprises biomechanical simulation engines for locomotion and voice, machine learning methods for analysing functional brain images, craniofacial morphology and neuronal multi-scale simulations. Projects are conducted in close collaborations with Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska Hospital in Sweden as well as other laboratories in Europe, U.S., Japan and India.

Our research on brain-like computing concerns methods development for perceptual systems that extract information from sensory signals (images, video and audio), analysis of functional brain images and EEG data, learning for autonomous agents as well as development of computational architectures (both software and hardware) for neural information processing. Our brain-inspired approach to computing also applies more generically to other computer science problems such as pattern recognition, data analysis and intelligent systems. Recent industrial collaborations include analysis of patient brain data with MentisCura and the startup company 13 Lab bought by Facebook.

Our long term vision is to contribute to (i) deeper understanding of the computational mechanisms underlying biological brain function and (ii) better theories, methods and algorithms for perceptual and intelligent systems that perform artificial brain-like functions by (iii) performing interdisciplinary and cross-fertilizing research on both biological and artificial brain-like functions. 

On one hand, biological brains provide existence proofs for guiding our research on artificial perceptual and intelligent systems. On the other hand, applying Richard Feynman’s famous statement ”What I cannot create I do not understand” to brain science implies that we can only claim to fully understand the computational mechanisms underlying biological brain function if we can build and implement corresponding computational mechanisms on a computerized system that performs similar brain-like functions.

Place, publisher, year, pages
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2016. p. 1
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180669 (URN)
Note

QC 20160121

Available from: 2016-01-19 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Widing, E. & Ekeberg, Ö. (2015). Tailoring biomechanical model meshes for aero-acoustic simulations. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering: Imaging & Visualization
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tailoring biomechanical model meshes for aero-acoustic simulations
2015 (English)In: Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering: Imaging & Visualization, ISSN 2168-1171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To simulate the airflow and acoustic wave propagation associated with voice production, a closed surface mesh representing the vocal tract is needed. Biomechanically, the vocal tract is composed of surfaces from several different anatomical structures. We present a method for assembling a dynamic vocal tract mesh by trimming and stitching surface meshes tracking biomechanical models of relevant structures. Two algorithms, one for trimming and one for stitching, are used to first isolate surface mesh patches that are in contact with the airway and then merge them into a closed surface. The algorithms rely on manually selected boundaries and are able to cover gaps between mesh patches. Test cases are used to illustrate how the algorithms behave in various situations. The algorithms are implemented in the toolkit ArtiSynth where many relevant biomechanical models are already available.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
Keywords
Mesh, voice, trimming, stitching, vocal tract
National Category
Other Computer and Information Science
Research subject
Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-170659 (URN)10.1080/21681163.2015.1055516 (DOI)000428130400004 ()2-s2.0-85030420806 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Eunison
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 308874
Note

QC 20150714

Available from: 2015-07-02 Created: 2015-07-02 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Manfredi, L., Assaf, T., Mintchev, S., Marrazza, S., Capantini, L., Orofino, S., . . . Dario, P. (2013). A bioinspired autonomous swimming robot as a tool for studying goal-directed locomotion. Biological Cybernetics, 107(5), 513-527
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A bioinspired autonomous swimming robot as a tool for studying goal-directed locomotion
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2013 (English)In: Biological Cybernetics, ISSN 0340-1200, E-ISSN 1432-0770, Vol. 107, no 5, p. 513-527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The bioinspired approach has been key in combining the disciplines of robotics with neuroscience in an effective and promising fashion. Indeed, certain aspects in the field of neuroscience, such as goal-directed locomotion and behaviour selection, can be validated through robotic artefacts. In particular, swimming is a functionally important behaviour where neuromuscular structures, neural control architecture and operation can be replicated artificially following models from biology and neuroscience. In this article, we present a biomimetic system inspired by the lamprey, an early vertebrate that locomotes using anguilliform swimming. The artefact possesses extra- and proprioceptive sensory receptors, muscle-like actuation, distributed embedded control and a vision system. Experiments on optimised swimming and on goal-directed locomotion are reported, as well as the assessment of the performance of the system,which shows high energy efficiency and adaptive behaviour. While the focus is on providing a robotic platform for testing biological models, the reported system can also be of major relevance for the development of engineering system applications.

Keywords
Bioinspired autonomous robot, Lamprey-like robot, Goal-directed locomotion, Muscle-like actuation, Compliant robot, Distributed control
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-132247 (URN)10.1007/s00422-013-0566-2 (DOI)000325101800003 ()2-s2.0-84885468662 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 216100
Note

QC 20131106

Available from: 2013-10-25 Created: 2013-10-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kamali Sarvestani, I., Kozlov, A., Harischandra, N., Grillner, S. & Ekeberg, Ö. (2013). A computational model of visually guided locomotion in lamprey. Biological Cybernetics, 107(5), 497-512
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A computational model of visually guided locomotion in lamprey
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2013 (English)In: Biological Cybernetics, ISSN 0340-1200, E-ISSN 1432-0770, Vol. 107, no 5, p. 497-512Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study addresses mechanisms for the generation and selection of visual behaviors in anamniotes. To demonstrate the function of these mechanisms, we have constructed an experimental platform where a simulated animal swims around in a virtual environment containing visually detectable objects. The simulated animal moves as a result of simulated mechanical forces between the water and its body. The undulations of the body are generated by contraction of simulated muscles attached to realistic body components. Muscles are driven by simulated motoneurons within networks of central pattern generators. Reticulospinal neurons, which drive the spinal pattern generators, are in turn driven directly and indirectly by visuomotor centers in the brainstem. The neural networks representing visuomotor centers receive sensory input from a simplified retina. The model also includes major components of the basal ganglia, as these are hypothesized to be key components in behavior selection. We have hypothesized that sensorimotor transformation in tectum and pretectum transforms the place-coded retinal information into rate-coded turning commands in the reticulospinal neurons via a recruitment network mimicking the layered structure of tectal areas. Via engagement of the basal ganglia, the system proves to be capable of selecting among several possible responses, even if exposed to conflicting stimuli. The anatomically based structure of the control system makes it possible to disconnect different neural components, yielding concrete predictions of how animals with corresponding lesions would behave. The model confirms that the neural networks identified in the lamprey are capable of responding appropriately to simple, multiple, and conflicting stimuli.

Keywords
Tectum, Pretectum, Basal ganglia, Mesencephalic locomotor region, Reticulospinal, Central pattern generator, Lamprey
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-104455 (URN)10.1007/s00422-012-0524-4 (DOI)000325101800002 ()2-s2.0-84885469474 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, ICT-2007.8.3Swedish Research Council
Note

QC 20131106

Available from: 2012-11-02 Created: 2012-11-02 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Bicanski, A., Ryczko, D., Knuesel, J., Harischandra, N., Charrier, V., Ekeberg, Ö., . . . Ijspeert, A. J. (2013). Decoding the mechanisms of gait generation in salamanders by combining neurobiology, modeling and robotics. Biological Cybernetics, 107(5), 545-564
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decoding the mechanisms of gait generation in salamanders by combining neurobiology, modeling and robotics
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2013 (English)In: Biological Cybernetics, ISSN 0340-1200, E-ISSN 1432-0770, Vol. 107, no 5, p. 545-564Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vertebrate animals exhibit impressive locomotor skills. These locomotor skills are due to the complex interactions between the environment, the musculo-skeletal system and the central nervous system, in particular the spinal locomotor circuits. We are interested in decoding these interactions in the salamander, a key animal from an evolutionary point of view. It exhibits both swimming and stepping gaits and is faced with the problem of producing efficient propulsive forces using the same musculo-skeletal system in two environments with significant physical differences in density, viscosity and gravitational load. Yet its nervous system remains comparatively simple. Our approach is based on a combination of neurophysiological experiments, numerical modeling at different levels of abstraction, and robotic validation using an amphibious salamander-like robot. This article reviews the current state of our knowledge on salamander locomotion control, and presents how our approach has allowed us to obtain a first conceptual model of the salamander spinal locomotor networks. The model suggests that the salamander locomotor circuit can be seen as a lamprey-like circuit controlling axial movements of the trunk and tail, extended by specialized oscillatory centers controlling limb movements. The interplay between the two types of circuits determines the mode of locomotion under the influence of sensory feedback and descending drive, with stepping gaits at low drive, and swimming at high drive.

Keywords
Salamander, Locomotion, Oscillators, Modeling, Neurobiology, Robotics
National Category
Robotics Zoology Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-120340 (URN)10.1007/s00422-012-0543-1 (DOI)000325101800005 ()2-s2.0-84885469530 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencyEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-ICT-2007-1-216100
Note

QC 20131106

Available from: 2013-04-04 Created: 2013-04-04 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Kamali Sarvestani, I. & Ekeberg, Ö. (2013). Internal Connectivity of the GlobusPallidus and the Arbitration System.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internal Connectivity of the GlobusPallidus and the Arbitration System
2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The rodent globus pallidus (homologue of primate external globus pallidus) has been shown to be composed of two types neuronal groups based on their location and local axon collaterals. The rostral outer layer near the striatopallidal border (GPr) has shorter but more dense local axon collaterals while the caudal inner layer (GPc) has wider and less dense axon collaterals. Moreover, the connection between the two segments is unidirectional with outer layer neurons sending inhibitory projections to the inner layer. Both segments inhibit the substantia nigra and the entopeduncular nucleus (homologue of primate internal globus pallidus). We have created a model of the basal ganglia arbitration subsystem composed of the subthalamic nucleus, the two segments of the pallidus as well as the entopeduncular nucleus and the substantia nigra in order to assess functional roles of the two pallidal segments. The simulations reveal that both segments of the pallidum are involved in winner-take-all structure of the arbitration system but the type of information competing is different in the two subsystems. In the STN-GPr network, strong lateral inhibition between pallidal neurons representing muscles leads to selection of a muscle which has been (due to noise or other reasons) randomly overactivated. In contrast, in STN-GPc network actions (each utilizing many muscles) compete. Our simulations suggest that both networks are active during selection and execution of movements. If overactivation of a muscle is accompanied with dopamine flow, the GPr-GPc connection together with local axonal network of GPc suppress other muscles and reinforce the muscle whose overactivity has caused the dopaminergic flow. Simulated lesions of these neuronal groups also show different results. Lesioning GPr results in synchronous activity in GPc and SNr but the mean firing rate of these nuclei remains untouched. Lesioning GPc on the other hand lifts the activity in the SNr drastically but does not create synchrony in any of the nuclei. The results suggest that STN-GPc and STN-GPr can be considered as two different subsystems working both in synergy and in competition.

National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
The KTH Railway Group - Tribology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-136743 (URN)
Note

QS 2013

Available from: 2013-12-09 Created: 2013-12-09 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M., Sarvestani, I. K., Ekeberg, Ö. & Hällgren Kotaleski, J. (2013). Signal enhancement in the output stage of the basal ganglia by synaptic short-term plasticity in the direct, indirect, and hyperdirect pathways. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, 7, UNSP 76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Signal enhancement in the output stage of the basal ganglia by synaptic short-term plasticity in the direct, indirect, and hyperdirect pathways
2013 (English)In: Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5188, E-ISSN 1662-5188, Vol. 7, p. UNSP 76-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many of the synapses in the basal ganglia display short-term plasticity. Still, computational models have not yet been used to investigate how this affects signaling. Here we use a model of the basal ganglia network, constrained by available data, to quantitatively investigate how synaptic short-term plasticity affects the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr), the basal ganglia output nucleus. We find that SNr becomes particularly responsive to the characteristic burst-like activity seen in both direct and indirect pathway striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN). As expected by the standard model, direct pathway MSNs are responsible for decreasing the activity in SNr. In particular, our simulations indicate that bursting in only a few percent of the direct pathway MSNs is sufficient for completely inhibiting SNr neuron activity. The standard model also suggests that SNr activity in the indirect pathway is controlled by MSNs disinhibiting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) via the globus pallidus externa (GPe). Our model rather indicates that SNr activity is controlled by the direct GPe-SNr projections. This is partly because GPe strongly inhibits SNr but also due to depressing STN-SNr synapses. Furthermore, depressing GPe-SNr synapses allow the system to become sensitive to irregularly firing GPe subpopulations, as seen in dopamine depleted conditions, even when the GPe mean firing rate does not change. Similar to the direct pathway, simulations indicate that only a few percent of bursting indirect pathway MSNs can significantly increase the activity in SNr. Finally, the model predicts depressing STN-SNr synapses, since such an assumption explains experiments showing that a brief transient activation of the hyperdirect pathway generates a tri-phasic response in SNr, while a sustained STN activation has minor effects. This can be explained if STN-SNr synapses are depressing such that their effects are counteracted by the (known) depressing GPe-SNr inputs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Research Foundation, 2013
Keywords
substantia nigra pars reticulata, short-term plasticity, basal ganglia, network model, subthalamic nucleus, globus pallidus, facilitation, depression
National Category
Neurosciences Bioinformatics (Computational Biology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-125577 (URN)10.3389/fncom.2013.00076 (DOI)000320851300001 ()2-s2.0-84879713273 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

QC 20130809

Available from: 2013-08-09 Created: 2013-08-09 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Harischandra, N., Knuesel, J., Kozlov, A., Bicanski, A., Cabelguen, J.-M., Ijspeert, A. & Ekeberg, Ö. (2011). Sensory feedback plays a significant role in generating walking gait and in gait transition in salamanders: a simulation study. Frontiers in Neurorobotics, 5, 3:1-3:13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensory feedback plays a significant role in generating walking gait and in gait transition in salamanders: a simulation study
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2011 (English)In: Frontiers in Neurorobotics, ISSN 1662-5218, Vol. 5, p. 3:1-3:13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we investigate the role of sensory feedback in gait generation and transition by using a three-dimensional, neuro-musculo-mechanical model of a salamander with realistic physical parameters. Activation of limb and axial muscles were driven by neural output patterns obtained from a central pattern generator (CPG) which is composed of simulated spiking neurons with adaptation. The CPG consists of a body-CPG and four limb-CPGs that are interconnected via synapses both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. We use the model both with and without sensory modulation and four different combinations of ipsilateral and contralateral coupling between the limb-CPGs. We found that the proprioceptive sensory inputs are essential in obtaining a coordinated lateral sequence walking gait (walking). The sensory feedback includes the signals coming from the stretch receptor like intraspinal neurons located in the girdle regions and the limb stretch receptors residing in the hip and scapula regions of the salamander. On the other hand, walking trot gait (trotting) is more under central (CPG) influence compared to that of the peripheral or sensory feedback. We found that the gait transition from walking to trotting can be induced by increased activity of the descending drive coming from the mesencephalic locomotor region and is helped by the sensory inputs at the hip and scapula regions detecting the late stance phase. More neurophysiological experiments are required to identify the precise type of mechanoreceptors in the salamander and the neural mechanisms mediating the sensory modulation.

Keywords
computer simulation, gait transition, locomotion, neuronal network, sensory feedback, spiking neurons, walking gait
National Category
Zoology Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-44040 (URN)10.3389/fnbot.2011.00003 (DOI)2-s2.0-84861945597 (Scopus ID)
Projects
LAMPETRA
Note
QC 20111117Available from: 2011-10-19 Created: 2011-10-19 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2792-1622

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