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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Hagberg, E., Flodin, S., Granqvist, S., Karsten, A., Neovius, E. & Lohmander, A. (2019). The Impact of Maxillary Advancement on Consonant Proficiency in Patients With Cleft Lip and Palate, Lay Listeners' Opinion, and Patients' Satisfaction With Speech. The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, 56(4), 454-461
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Maxillary Advancement on Consonant Proficiency in Patients With Cleft Lip and Palate, Lay Listeners' Opinion, and Patients' Satisfaction With Speech
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2019 (English)In: The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, ISSN 1055-6656, E-ISSN 1545-1569, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 454-461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study investigates the impact of maxillary advancement (Le Fort Iosteotomy) on consonant proficiency in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and explores how these patients and lay people perceive their speech 1 year post Le Fort I osteotomy. Design: Retrospective group study before and after treatment. Participants: All patients with CLP who had undergone Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary retrognathia between 2007 and 2010 at Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden (n = 21). Six patients were excluded due to additional malformations and missing data. Two experienced speech and language pathologists assessed consonant proficiency, and speech accuracy was determined by lay listeners from pre- and postoperative standardized audio recordings. The patients' satisfaction with speech postoperatively was collected from medical records. Main Outcome Measures: Percentage of oral consonants correct and acoustic analysis of /s/, lay listeners' opinion, and patients' satisfaction with speech. Results: One year postoperation, 11 of the 15 patients had improved articulation, especially on the /s/-sound, without speech intervention. The mean percentage of oral consonants correct before treatment (82%) was significantly improved later (95%; P > .01). This assessment was supported by the patients' satisfaction with speech. However, lay listeners' opinion on accuracy was inconsistent. Length of maxillary advancement or change in occlusion did not correlate with change in articulation. Conclusion: Maxillary advancement performed to normalize occlusion and facial profile improved consonant proficiency in patients with CLP 1 year postoperation. Lay listeners' and patients' perceptions of speech need further exploration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2019
Keywords
acoustics, articulation, dental occlusion, orthognathic surgery, osteotomy, speech production
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-248330 (URN)10.1177/1055665618784804 (DOI)000461717800003 ()29949386 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063296079 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190409

Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Wistbacka, G., Andrade, P. A., Simberg, S., Hammarberg, B., Sodersten, M., Svec, J. G. & Granqvist, S. (2018). Resonance Tube Phonation in Water-the Effect of Tube Diameter and Water Depth on Back Pressure and Bubble Characteristics at Different Airflows. Journal of Voice, 32(1), Article ID UNSP 126.e11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resonance Tube Phonation in Water-the Effect of Tube Diameter and Water Depth on Back Pressure and Bubble Characteristics at Different Airflows
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 32, no 1, article id UNSP 126.e11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives:. Resonance tube phonation with tube end in water is a voice therapy method in which the patient phonates through a glass tube, keeping the free end of the tube submerged in water, creating bubbles. The purpose of this experimental study was to determine flow-pressure relationship, flow thresholds between bubble types, and bubble frequency as a function of flow and back volume. Methods. A flow-driven vocal tract simulator was used for recording the back pressure produced by resonance tubes with inner diameters of 8 and 9 mm submerged at water depths of 0-7 cm. Visual inspection of bubble types through video recording was also performed. Results. The static back pressure was largely determined by the water depth. The narrower tube provided a slightly higher back pressure for a given flow and depth. The amplitude of the pressure oscillations increased with flow and depth. Depending on flow, the bubbles were emitted from the tube in three distinct types with increasing flow: one by one, pairwise, and in a chaotic manner. The bubble frequency was slightly higher for the narrower tube. An increase in back volume led to a decrease in bubble frequency. Conclusions. This study provides data on the physical properties of resonance tube phonation with the tube end in water. This information will be useful in future research when looking into the possible effects of this type of voice training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MOSBY-ELSEVIER, 2018
Keywords
Resonance tube phonation in water, Back pressure, Tube diameter, Water depth, Voice therapy
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-224052 (URN)10.1016/j.jvoice.2017.04.015 (DOI)000425917400020 ()2-s2.0-85019390057 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180316

Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
Švec, J. & Granqvist, S. (2018). Tutorial and guidelines on measurement of sound pressure level in voice and speech. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 61(3), 441-461
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tutorial and guidelines on measurement of sound pressure level in voice and speech
2018 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 441-461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Sound pressure level (SPL) measurement of voice and speech is often considered a trivial matter, but the measured levels are often reported incorrectly or incompletely, making them difficult to compare among various studies. This article aims at explaining the fundamental principles behind these measurements and providing guidelines to improve their accuracy and reproducibility. Method: Basic information is put together from standards, technical, voice and speech literature, and practical experience of the authors and is explained for nontechnical readers. Results: Variation of SPL with distance, sound level meters and their accuracy, frequency and time weightings, and background noise topics are reviewed. Several calibration procedures for SPL measurements are described for stand-mounted and head-mounted microphones. Conclusions: SPL of voice and speech should be reported together with the mouth-to-microphone distance so that the levels can be related to vocal power. Sound level measurement settings (i.e., frequency weighting and time weighting/averaging) should always be specified. Classified sound level meters should be used to assure measurement accuracy. Head-mounted microphones placed at the proximity of the mouth improve signal-to-noise ratio and can be taken advantage of for voice SPL measurements when calibrated. Background noise levels should be reported besides the sound levels of voice and speech. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2018
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-227418 (URN)10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0095 (DOI)000428251900001 ()2-s2.0-85044198320 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 9 May 2018; Article; CODEN: JSLRF; Correspondence Address: Švec, J.G.; Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacký UniversityCzech Republic; email: jan.svec@upol.cz; Funding details: GA16-01246S, GACR, Grantová Agentura České Republiky; Funding details: GA CR, GACR, Grantová Agentura České Republiky; Funding text: This work was supported by the Czech Science Foundation (GA CR) Project GA16-01246S, awarded to Jan G. Švec, and by Svante Granqvist. Supplemental material to this article in the form of MATLAB scripts is available at http://www.mathworks. com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/64231-calibratevoicespl. QC 20180530

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
Geneid, A., Lindestad, P.-A. -., Granqvist, S., Möller, R. & Södersten, M. (2017). Long-term follow-up of patients with spasmodic dysphonia and improved voice despite discontinuation of treatment. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 68(3), 144-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term follow-up of patients with spasmodic dysphonia and improved voice despite discontinuation of treatment
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2017 (English)In: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, ISSN 1021-7762, E-ISSN 1421-9972, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 144-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate voice function in patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) who discontinued botulinum toxin (BTX) treatment because they felt that their voice had improved sufficiently. Patients and Methods: Twenty-eight patients quit treatment in 2004, of whom 20 fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the study, with 3 subsequently excluded because of return of symptoms, leaving 17 patients (11 males, 6 females) included in this follow-up study. A questionnaire concerning current voice function and the Voice Handicap Index were completed. Audio-perceptual voice assessments were done by 3 listeners. The inter- and intrarater reliabilities were r > 0.80. Results: All patients had a subjectively good stable voice, but with differences in their audio-perceptual voice assessment scores. Based on the pre-/posttreatment auditory scores on the overall degree of AdSD, patients were divided into 2 subgroups showing more and less improvement, with 10 and 7 patients, respectively. The subgroup with more improvement had shorter duration from the onset of symptoms until the start of BTX treatment, and included 7 males compared to only 4 males in the subgroup with less improvement. Conclusion: It seems plausible that the symptoms of spasmodic dysphonia may decrease over time. Early intervention and male gender seem to be important factors for long-term reduction of the voice symptoms of AdSD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2017
Keywords
Botulinum toxin, Discontinuation of treatment, Improved voice, Long-term follow-up, Spasmodic dysphonia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-201861 (URN)10.1159/000449100 (DOI)000393049800008 ()2-s2.0-85001560584 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170308

Available from: 2017-03-08 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
La, F. M. B., Wistbacka, G., Andrade, P. A. & Granqvist, S. (2017). Real-Time Visual Feedback of Airflow in Voice Training: Aerodynamic Properties of Two Flow Ball Devices. Journal of Voice, 31(3), Article ID UNSP 390.e1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Real-Time Visual Feedback of Airflow in Voice Training: Aerodynamic Properties of Two Flow Ball Devices
2017 (English)In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 31, no 3, article id UNSP 390.e1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. Flow ball devices have been used as teaching tools to provide visual real-time feedback of airflow during singing. This study aims at exploring static back pressure and ball height as function of flow for two devices, marketed as flow ball and floating ball game. Study Design. This is a comparative descriptive study. Methods. A flow-driven vocal tract simulator was used to investigate the aerodynamic properties of these two devices, testing them for four different ball sizes. The flow range investigated was between 0 and 0.5 L/s. Audio, flow, pressure, and ball height were recorded. Results. The flow pressure profiles for both tested devices were similar to those observed in previous studies on narrow tubes. For lifting the ball, both devices had a flow and a pressure threshold. The tested floating ball game required considerably higher back pressure for a given flow as compared with the flow ball. Conclusions. Both tested devices have similar effects on back pressure as straws of 3.7 and 3.0 mm in diameter for the flow ball and the floating ball game, respectively. One might argue that both devices could be used as tools for practicing semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, with the additional benefit of providing real-time visual feedback of airflow during phonation. The flow threshold, combined with the flow feedback, would increase awareness of flow, rather than of pressure, during exercises using a flow ball device.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MOSBY-ELSEVIER, 2017
Keywords
Flow ball, Floating ball game, Real-time visual feedback of airflow, Semi-occluded vocal tract, Voice training
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-210939 (URN)10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.09.024 (DOI)000403543600056 ()2-s2.0-85005807541 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170714

Available from: 2017-07-14 Created: 2017-07-14 Last updated: 2017-07-14Bibliographically approved
Andrade, P. A., Wistbacka, G., Larsson, H., Sodersten, M., Hammarberg, B., Simberg, S., . . . Granqvist, S. (2016). The Flow and Pressure Relationships in Different Tubes Commonly Used for Semi-occluded Vocal Tract Exercises. Journal of Voice, 30(1), 36-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Flow and Pressure Relationships in Different Tubes Commonly Used for Semi-occluded Vocal Tract Exercises
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This experimental study investigated the back pressure (Pback) versus flow (U) relationship for 10 different tubes commonly used for semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, that is, eight straws of different lengths and diameters, a resonance tube, and a silicone tube similar to a Lax Vox tube. All tubes were assessed with the free end in air. The resonance tube and silicone tube were further assessed with the free end under water at the depths from 1 to 7 cm in steps of 1 cm. The results showed that relative changes in the diameter of straws affect Pback considerably more compared with the same amount of relative change in length. Additionally, once tubes are submerged into water, Pback needs to overcome the pressure generated by the water depth before flow can start. Under this condition, only a small increase in Pback was observed as the flow was increased. Therefore, the wider tubes submerged into water produced an almost constant Pback determined by the water depth, whereas the thinner straws in air produced relatively large changes to Pback as flow was changed. These differences may be taken advantage of when customizing exercises for different users and diagnoses and optimizing the therapy outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mosby-Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, Straw, Resonance tube, Lax Vox tube, Voice therapy, Flow, Pressure, Back pressure
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180976 (URN)10.1016/j.jvoice.2015.02.004 (DOI)000367482200007 ()25873546 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84952861296 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160128

Available from: 2016-01-28 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Granqvist, S., Simberg, S., Hertegård, S., Holmqvist, S., Larsson, H., Lindestad, P.-Å. -., . . . Hammarberg, B. (2015). Resonance tube phonation in water: High-speed imaging, electroglottographic and oral pressure observations of vocal fold vibrations - A pilot study. Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, 40(3), 113-121
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resonance tube phonation in water: High-speed imaging, electroglottographic and oral pressure observations of vocal fold vibrations - A pilot study
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2015 (English)In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phonation into glass tubes (resonance tubes), keeping the free end of the tube in water, has been a frequently used voice therapy method in Finland and more recently also in other countries. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate what effects tube phonation with and without water has on the larynx. Two participants were included in the study. The methods used were high-speed imaging, electroglottographic observations of vocal fold vibrations, and measurements of oral pressure during tube phonation. Results showed that the fluctuation in the back pressure during tube phonation in water altered the vocal fold vibrations. In the high-speed imaging, effects were found in the open quotient and amplitude variation of the glottal opening. The open quotient increased with increasing water depth (from 2 cm to 6 cm). A modulation effect by the water bubbles on the vocal fold vibrations was seen both in the high-speed glottal area tracings and in the electroglottography signal. A second experiment revealed that the increased average oral pressure was largely determined by the water depth. The increased open quotient can possibly be explained by an increased abduction of the vocal folds and/or a reduced transglottal pressure. The back pressure of the bubbles also modulates glottal vibrations with a possible massage effect on the vocal folds. This effect and the well-defined average pressure increase due to the known water depth are different from those of other methods using a semi-occluded vocal tract.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
Back pressure, bubbles in water, electroglottography, high-speed imaging, oral pressure, resonance tube phonation in water, semi-occluded vocal tract
National Category
Medical Equipment Engineering Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-181235 (URN)10.3109/14015439.2014.913682 (DOI)000369765300003 ()2-s2.0-84942524983 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160208. QC 20160318

Available from: 2016-02-08 Created: 2016-01-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Sramkova, H., Granqvist, S., Herbst, C. T. & Svec, J. G. (2015). The softest sound levels of the human voice in normal subjects. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 137(1), 407-418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The softest sound levels of the human voice in normal subjects
2015 (English)In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 407-418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Accurate measurement of the softest sound levels of phonation presents technical and methodological challenges. This study aimed at (1) reliably obtaining normative data on sustained softest sound levels for the vowel [a:] at comfortable pitch; (2) comparing the results for different frequency and time weighting methods; and (3) refining the Union of European Phoniatricians' recommendation on allowed background noise levels for scientific and equipment manufacturers' purposes. Eighty healthy untrained participants (40 females, 40 males) were investigated in quiet rooms using a head-mounted microphone and a sound level meter at 30 cm distance. The one-second-equivalent sound levels were more stable and more representative for evaluating the softest sustained phonations than the fast-time-weighted levels. At 30 cm, these levels were in the range of 48-61 dB(C)/41-53 dB(A) for females and 49-64 dB(C)/35-53 dB(A) for males (5% to 95% quantile range). These ranges may serve as reference data in evaluating vocal normality. In order to reach a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 10 dB for more than 95% of the normal population, the background noise should be below 25 dB(A) and 38 dB(C), respectively, for the softest phonation measurements at 30 cm distance. For the A-weighting, this is 15 dB lower than the previously recommended value.

Keywords
Dysphonia Severity Index, Range Profiles, Speaking, Phonetograms, Capabilities, Reliability, Students, Features, Therapy, Quality
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-160757 (URN)10.1121/1.4904538 (DOI)000348369000058 ()25618070 (PubMedID)
Note

QC 20150302

Available from: 2015-03-02 Created: 2015-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Titze, I. R., Baken, R. J., Bozeman, K. W., Granqvist, S., Henrich, N., Herbst, C. T., . . . Wolfe, J. (2015). Toward a consensus on symbolic notation of harmonics, resonances, and formants in vocalization. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 137(5), 3005-3007
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward a consensus on symbolic notation of harmonics, resonances, and formants in vocalization
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2015 (English)In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 137, no 5, p. 3005-3007Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-169280 (URN)10.1121/1.4919349 (DOI)000354962900055 ()25994732 (PubMedID)
Note

QC 20150615

Available from: 2015-06-15 Created: 2015-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, J., Scherer, R., Hess, M., Müller, F. & Granqvist, S. (2013). Subglottal Pressure Oscillations Accompanying Phonation. Journal of Voice, 27(4), 411-421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subglottal Pressure Oscillations Accompanying Phonation
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 411-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Acoustic and aerodynamic properties of the voice source and vocal tract have been extensively analyzed during the last half century. Corresponding investigations of the subglottal system are rare but can be assumed to be relevant to voice production. In the present exploratory study, subglottal pressure was recorded in a male adult subject by means of tracheal puncture. Also recorded were the oral airflow and audio signals. Effects of vowel, phonation type, and vocal register shifts on the subglottal pressure waveform were examined. The moment of maximum flow declination rate was synchronous with the main positive peak of the subglottal pressure waveform. The three lowest subglottal resonance frequencies, determined by inverse filtering and long-term average spectra of the subglottal pressure during speech, were found to be about 500, 1220, and 2000 Hz, irrespective of supraglottal variations and phonation type. However, the subglottal pressure waveform was affected by the supraglottal formants, whereas the radiated vowel spectra did not show clear influence by the subglottal resonances. The fundamental frequency immediately preceding and immediately following a register break in pitch glides did not show systematic relationships with formants or with the lowest subglottal resonance.

Keywords
Subglottal resonance, Register break, Voice source, Filter, source interaction
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-125570 (URN)10.1016/j.jvoice.2013.03.006 (DOI)000321435900003 ()2-s2.0-84879745534 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20130812

Available from: 2013-08-12 Created: 2013-08-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4129-9793

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