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BETA
Vilaplana, FranciscoORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3572-7798
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 61) Show all publications
de Jesus, L. I., Smiderle, F. R., Ruthes, A. C., Vilaplana, F., Dal'Lin, F. T., Maria-Ferreira, D., . . . Iacomini, M. (2018). Chemical characterization and wound healing property of a beta-D-glucan from edible mushroom Piptoporus betulinus. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, 117, 1361-1366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical characterization and wound healing property of a beta-D-glucan from edible mushroom Piptoporus betulinus
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 117, p. 1361-1366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A water-soluble beta-D-glucan was obtained from fruiting bodies of Piptoporus betulinus, by hot aqueous extraction followed by freeze-thawing procedure and dialysis. Its molar mass distribution and conformational behavior in solution was assessed by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle laser light scattering, showing a polysaccharide with an average molecular weight of 2.5 x 10(5) Da with a random coil conformation for molecular weights below 1 x 10(6) Da. Typical signals of beta-(1 -> 3)-linkages were observed in NMR spectrum (delta 102.7/4.76; 102.8/4.74; 102.9/4.52; and delta 85.1/3.78; 85.0/3.77) and also signals of O-6 substitution at delta 69.2/4.22 and 69.2/3.87. The analysis of partially O-methylated alditol acetates corroborates the NMR results, indicating the presence of a beta-D-glucan with a main chain (1 -> 3)-linked, substituted at O-6 by single-units of glucose. The beta-D-glucan showed no toxicity on human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2) up to 1000 mu g mL(-1) and promoted cell migration on in vitro scratch assay, demonstrating a potential wound healing capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
beta-D-glucan, Random coil, Wound healing
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-234561 (URN)10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2017.12.107 (DOI)000442057700154 ()29274425 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042161770 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180919

Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Martinez-Abad, A., Giummarella, N., Lawoko, M. & Vilaplana, F. (2018). Differences in extractability under subcritical water reveal interconnected hemicellulose and lignin recalcitrance in birch hardwoods. Green Chemistry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in extractability under subcritical water reveal interconnected hemicellulose and lignin recalcitrance in birch hardwoods
2018 (English)In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hardwoods constitute an essential renewable resource for the production of platform chemicals and bio-based materials. A method for the sequential extraction of hemicelluloses and lignin from hardwoods is proposed using subcritical water in buffered conditions without prior delignification. This allows the cascade isolation of mannan, xylan and lignin-carbohydrate complexes based on their extractability and recalcitrance in birch lignocellulose. The time evolution of the extraction was monitored in terms of composition, oligomeric mass profiling and sequencing of the hemicelluloses, and molecular structure of the lignin and lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) by heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance (2D HSQC NMR). The minor mannan and pectin populations are easily extractable at short times (<5 min), whereas the major glucuronoxylan (GX) becomes enriched at moderate extraction times. Longer extraction times results in major hydrolysis exhibiting GX fractions with tighter glucuronation spacing and lignin enrichment. The pattern of acetylation and glucuronation in GX is correlated with extractability and with connectivity with lignin through LCCs. This interconnected molecular heterogeneity of hemicelluloses and lignin has important implications for their supramolecular assembly and therefore determines the recalcitrance of hardwood lignocellulosic biomass.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Wood Science
Research subject
Fibre and Polymer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-226948 (URN)10.1039/C8GC00385H (DOI)000434313100016 ()2-s2.0-85048032938 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20180509

Available from: 2018-04-29 Created: 2018-04-29 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Jamshidian, H., Shojaosadati, S. A., Mousavi, S. M., Soudi, M. R. & Vilaplana, F. (2017). Implications of recovery procedures on structural and rheological properties of schizophyllan produced from date syrup. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, 105, 36-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implications of recovery procedures on structural and rheological properties of schizophyllan produced from date syrup
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 105, p. 36-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the effects of different recovery procedures on high molar mass schizophyl-Ian produced by Schizophyllum commune using low value agricultural residues. Recovered extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) were compared in terms of purity, sugar composition, degree of branching, molecular weight, and rheological properties. Performing different recovery methods, such as re-dissolving in water and re-precipitation with ethanol on produced EPS, provided schizophyllan with purity similar to the commercial grade. Besides, Freeze-thawing cycles allowed the fractionation of schizophyllan based on branching degree and solubility. The EPSs with higher purity and lower degree of branching (less conformational flexibility) showed higher viscosity. This study evidences the possibility of producing EPSs with excellent rheological properties using low value agricultural side products. Furthermore, our results demonstrate the importance of recovery methods for tailoring the purity, molecular structure and macroscopic properties of the produced polysaccharides for specific applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Schizophyllan, Exopolysaccharide (EPS), Recovery procedure, Rheological properties, Molecular structures
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220267 (URN)10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2017.06.110 (DOI)000414882900005 ()28668611 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85023600986 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180110

Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Morais de Carvalho, D., Abad, A. M., Evtuguin, D. V., Colodette, J. L., Lindström, M., Vilaplana, F. & Sevastyanova, O. (2017). Isolation and characterization of acetylated glucuronoarabinoxylan from sugarcane bagasse and straw. Carbohydrate Polymers, 156, 223-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isolation and characterization of acetylated glucuronoarabinoxylan from sugarcane bagasse and straw
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2017 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 156, p. 223-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sugarcane bagasse and straw are generated in large volumes as by-products of agro-industrial production. They are an emerging valuable resource for the generation of hemicellulose-based materials and products, since they contain significant quantities of xylans (often twice as much as in hardwoods). Heteroxylans (yields of ca 20% based on xylose content in sugarcane bagasse and straw) were successfully isolated and purified using mild delignification followed by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extraction. Delignification with peracetic acid (PAA) was more efficient than traditional sodium chlorite (NaClO2) delignification for xylan extraction from both biomasses, resulting in higher extraction yields and purity. We have shown that the heteroxylans isolated from sugarcane bagasse and straw are acetylated glucuronoarabinoxylans (GAX), with distinct molecular structures. Bagasse GAX had a slightly lower glycosyl substitution molar ratio of Araf to Xylp to (0.5:10) and (4-O-Me)GlpA to Xylp (0.1:10) than GAX from straw (0.8:10 and 0.1:10 respectively), but a higher degree of acetylation (0.33 and 0.10, respectively). A higher frequency of acetyl groups substitution at position α-(1 → 3) (Xyl-3Ac) than at position α-(1 → 2) (Xyl-2Ac) was confirmed for both bagasse and straw GAX, with a minor ratio of diacetylation (Xyl-2,3Ac). The size and molecular weight distributions for the acetylated GAX extracted from the sugarcane bagasse and straw were analyzed using multiple-detection size-exclusion chromatography (SEC-DRI-MALLS). Light scattering data provided absolute molar mass values for acetylated GAX with higher average values than did standard calibration. Moreover, the data highlighted differences in the molar mass distributions between the two isolation methods for both types of sugarcane GAX, which can be correlated with the different Araf and acetyl substitution patterns. We have developed an empirical model for the molecular structure of acetylated GAX extracted from sugarcane bagasse and straw with PAA/DMSO through the integration of results obtained from glycosidic linkage analysis, 1H NMR spectroscopy and acetyl quantification. This knowledge of the structure of xylans in sugarcane bagasse and straw will provide a better understanding of the isolation-structure-properties relationship of these biopolymers and, ultimately, create new possibilities for the use of sugarcane xylan in high-value applications, such as biochemicals and bio-based materials. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords
1H NMR spectroscopy, Acetylated xylan, Arabinoxylan, Linkage analysis, Sugarcane bagasse, Sugarcane straw, Acetylation, Biopolymers, Characterization, Delignification, Dimethyl sulfoxide, Extraction, Light scattering, Molecular structure, Molecular weight distribution, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Organic solvents, Polysaccharides, Size exclusion chromatography, Arabinoxylans, H NMR spectroscopy, Sugar-cane bagasse, Bagasse
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-195116 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.09.022 (DOI)2-s2.0-84987851359 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Details: 621-2014-5295, VR, Swedish Research Council. QC 20161107

Available from: 2016-11-07 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2017-06-28Bibliographically approved
Martinez-Abad, A., Berglund, J., Toriz, G., Gatenholm, P., Henriksson, G., Lindström, M., . . . Vilaplana, F. (2017). Regular Motifs in Xylan Modulate Molecular Flexibility and Interactions with Cellulose Surfaces. Plant Physiology, 175(4), 1579-1592
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regular Motifs in Xylan Modulate Molecular Flexibility and Interactions with Cellulose Surfaces
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2017 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 175, no 4, p. 1579-1592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Xylan is tightly associated with cellulose and lignin in secondary plant cell walls, contributing to its rigidity and structural integrity in vascular plants. However, the molecular features and the nanoscale forces that control the interactions among cellulose microfibrils, hemicelluloses, and lignin are still not well understood. Here, we combine comprehensive mass spectrometric glycan sequencing and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the substitution pattern in softwood xylans and to investigate the effect of distinct intramolecular motifs on xylan conformation and on the interaction with cellulose surfaces in Norway spruce (Picea abies). We confirm the presence of motifs with evenly spaced glycosyl decorations on the xylan backbone, together with minor motifs with consecutive glucuronation. These domains are differently enriched in xylan fractions extracted by alkali and subcritical water, which indicates their preferential positioning in the secondary plant cell wall ultrastructure. The flexibility of the 3-fold screw conformation of xylan in solution is enhanced by the presence of arabinofuranosyl decorations. Additionally, molecular dynamic simulations suggest that the glycosyl substitutions in xylan are not only sterically tolerated by the cellulose surfaces but that they increase the affinity for cellulose and favor the stabilization of the 2-fold screw conformation. This effect is more significant for the hydrophobic surface compared with the hydrophilic ones, which demonstrates the importance of nonpolar driving forces on the structural integrity of secondary plant cell walls. These novel molecular insights contribute to an improved understanding of the supramolecular architecture of plant secondary cell walls and have fundamental implications for overcoming lignocellulose recalcitrance and for the design of advanced wood-based materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Plant Biologists, 2017
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220477 (URN)10.1104/pp.17.01184 (DOI)000417083900007 ()2-s2.0-85037747688 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171222

Available from: 2017-12-22 Created: 2017-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-22Bibliographically approved
Ruthes, A. C., Martinez-Abad, A., Tan, H.-T., Bulone, V. & Vilaplana, F. (2017). Sequential fractionation of feruloylated hemicelluloses and oligosaccharides from wheat bran using subcritical water and xylanolytic enzymes. Green Chemistry, 19(8), 1919-1931
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sequential fractionation of feruloylated hemicelluloses and oligosaccharides from wheat bran using subcritical water and xylanolytic enzymes
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2017 (English)In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 1919-1931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wheat bran is a major by-product of cereal production that still has limited use for advanced nutritional and material applications. A sequential process using subcritical water, membrane filtration and selective enzymatic treatments has been designed for the combined fractionation of functional high molar mass hemicelluloses (over 10(5) g mol(-1)) and oligosaccharides from wheat bran. This process not only offers increased total solid yield compared with conventional protocols based on alkaline extraction, but it also preserves the inherent functionalities of the phenolic groups that substitute the carbohydrate structures of the extracted hemicelluloses. Feruloylated arabinoxylans (F-AX) with high molar mass and significant radical scavenging activity can be isolated from the subcritical water extract. Structurally different oligosaccharides, including mixed-linkage beta-D-glucan oligosaccharides (BGOs) and arabinoxylo-oligosaccharides (AXOs) can be recovered from the eluent after membrane filtration. The crosslinked residue after subcritical water extraction was further treated with xylanolytic enzymes to release valuable feruloylated arabinoxylo-oligosaccharides (FAXOs). The oligo-and polysaccharide fractions isolated from this sequential process show great potential for use as prebiotic or platform chemicals, and as polymeric matrices for carbohydrate-based materials with radical scavenging properties, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2017
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-208245 (URN)10.1039/c6gc03473j (DOI)000399579500012 ()2-s2.0-85020188147 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2016-119
Note

QC 20170627

Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27 Last updated: 2017-06-27Bibliographically approved
Samalova, M., Melida, H., Vilaplana, F., Bulone, V., Soanes, D. M., Talbot, N. J. & Gurr, S. J. (2017). The beta-1,3-glucanosyltransferases (Gels) affect the structure of the rice blast fungal cell wall during appressorium-mediated plant infection. Cellular Microbiology, 19(3), Article ID UNSP e12659.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The beta-1,3-glucanosyltransferases (Gels) affect the structure of the rice blast fungal cell wall during appressorium-mediated plant infection
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2017 (English)In: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 19, no 3, article id UNSP e12659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fungal wall is pivotal for cell shape and function, and in interfacial protection during host infection and environmental challenge. Here, we provide the first description of the carbohydrate composition and structure of the cell wall of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. We focus on the family of glucan elongation proteins (Gels) and characterize five putative beta-1,3-glucan glucanosyltransferases that each carry the Glycoside Hydrolase 72 signature. We generated targeted deletion mutants of all Gel isoforms, that is, the GH72(+), which carry a putative carbohydrate-binding module, and the GH72(-)Gels, without this motif. We reveal that M. oryzae GH72(+) GELs are expressed in spores and during both infective and vegetative growth, but each individual Gel enzymes are dispensable for pathogenicity. Further, we demonstrated that Delta gel1 Delta gel3 Delta gel4 null mutant has a modified cell wall in which 1,3-glucans have a higher degree of polymerization and are less branched than the wild-type strain. The mutant showed significant differences in global patterns of gene expression, a hyper-branching phenotype and no sporulation, and thus was unable to cause rice blast lesions (except via wounded tissues). We conclude that Gel proteins play significant roles in structural modification of the fungal cell wall during appressorium-mediated plant infection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2017
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-205503 (URN)10.1111/cmi.12659 (DOI)000397853300001 ()2-s2.0-85006341376 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170510

Available from: 2017-05-10 Created: 2017-05-10 Last updated: 2017-06-27Bibliographically approved
McKee, L. S., Sunner, H., Anasontzis, G. E., Toriz, G., Gatenholm, P., Bulone, V., . . . Olsson, L. (2016). A GH115 alpha-glucuronidase from Schizophyllum commune contributes to the synergistic enzymatic deconstruction of softwood glucuronoarabinoxylan. Biotechnology for Biofuels, 9, Article ID 2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A GH115 alpha-glucuronidase from Schizophyllum commune contributes to the synergistic enzymatic deconstruction of softwood glucuronoarabinoxylan
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2016 (English)In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 9, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lignocellulosic biomass from softwood represents a valuable resource for the production of biofuels and bio-based materials as alternatives to traditional pulp and paper products. Hemicelluloses constitute an extremely heterogeneous fraction of the plant cell wall, as their molecular structures involve multiple monosaccharide components, glycosidic linkages, and decoration patterns. The complete enzymatic hydrolysis of wood hemicelluloses into monosaccharides is therefore a complex biochemical process that requires the activities of multiple degradative enzymes with complementary activities tailored to the structural features of a particular substrate. Glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX) is a major hemicellulose component in softwood, and its structural complexity requires more enzyme specificities to achieve complete hydrolysis compared to glucuronoxylans from hardwood and arabinoxylans from grasses. Results: We report the characterisation of a recombinant alpha-glucuronidase (Agu115) from Schizophyllum commune capable of removing (4-O-methyl)-glucuronic acid ((Me) GlcA) residues from polymeric and oligomeric xylan. The enzyme is required for the complete deconstruction of spruce glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX) and acts synergistically with other xylan-degrading enzymes, specifically a xylanase (Xyn10C), an alpha-l-arabinofuranosidase (AbfA), and a beta-xylosidase (XynB). Each enzyme in this mixture showed varying degrees of potentiation by the other activities, likely due to increased physical access to their respective target monosaccharides. The exo-acting Agu115 and AbfA were unable to remove all of their respective target side chain decorations from GAX, but their specific activity was significantly boosted by the addition of the endo-Xyn10C xylanase. We demonstrate that the proposed enzymatic cocktail (Agu115 with AbfA, Xyn10C and XynB) achieved almost complete conversion of GAX to arabinofuranose (Araf), xylopyranose (Xylp), and MeGlcA monosaccharides. Addition of Agu115 to the enzymatic cocktail contributes specifically to 25 % of the conversion. However, traces of residual oligosaccharides resistant to this combination of enzymes were still present after deconstruction, due to steric hindrances to enzyme access to the substrate. Conclusions: Our GH115 alpha-glucuronidase is capable of finely tailoring the molecular structure of softwood GAX, and contributes to the almost complete saccharification of GAX in synergy with other exo- and endo-xylan-acting enzymes. This has great relevance for the cost-efficient production of biofuels from softwood lignocellulose.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Lignocellulosic biomass, Glucuronoarabinoxylan, Glycoside hydrolases (GH), alpha-Glucuronidase, Agu115
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-181362 (URN)10.1186/s13068-015-0417-6 (DOI)000367513300002 ()26734072 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84954121323 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 621-2014-5295Chalmers Energy initiative
Note

QC 20160205

Available from: 2016-02-05 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Moriana, R., Vilaplana, F. & Ek, M. (2016). Cellulose Nanocrystals from Forest Residues as Reinforcing Agents for Composites: A Study from Macro- to Nano-Dimensions. Carbohydrate Polymers, 139, 139-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cellulose Nanocrystals from Forest Residues as Reinforcing Agents for Composites: A Study from Macro- to Nano-Dimensions
2016 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 139, p. 139-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates for the first time the feasibility of extracting cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) from softwood forestry logging residues (woody chips, branches and pine needles), with an obtained gravimetric yield of over 13%. Compared with the other residues, woody chips rendered a higher yield of bleached cellulosic fibers with higher hemicellulose, pectin and lignin content, longer diameter, and lower crystallinity and thermal stability. The isolation of CNCs from these bleached cellulosic fibers was verified by the removal of most of their amorphous components, the increase in the crystallinity index, and the nano-dimensions of the individual crystals. The differences in the physico-chemical properties of the fibers extracted from the three logging residues resulted in CNCs with specific physico-chemical properties. The potential of using the resulting CNCs as reinforcements in nanocomposites was discussed in terms of aspect ratio, crystallinity and thermal stability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Cellulose nanocrystals, Forest residues, Physico-chemical properties, Reinforcing agents in composites, Thermal properties
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180900 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2015.12.020 (DOI)000368097200018 ()2-s2.0-84952342690 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160202

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Jamshidian, H., Shojaosadati, S. A., Vilaplana, F., Mousavi, S. M. & Soudi, M. R. (2016). Characterization and optimization of schizophyllan production from date syrup. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, 92, 484-493
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization and optimization of schizophyllan production from date syrup
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 92, p. 484-493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study demonstrates the efficient utilization of low-cost agricultural substrates, particularly date syrup, by Schizophyllum commune ATCC 38548 for schizophyllan production. Initially, one factor-at-a-time method was used to find the best carbon and nitrogen sources for schizophyllan production. Subsequently, response surface methodology was employed to optimize the level of culture medium components to maximize substrate conversion yield and schizophyllan production in submerged culture. Maximum product yield (0.12 g schizophyllan/g date syrup) and schizophyllan production (8.5 g/l) were obtained at concentrations of date syrup and corn steep liquor, inoculum size and agitation rate at 7.02 %w/v, 0.10 %w/v, 7.68 %v/v and 181 rpm, respectively. Sugar composition analysis, FTIR, NMR and molar mass determination revealed the purity and molecular properties of recovered schizophyllan produced from date syrup as glycosidic linkage analysis showed three main schizophyllan characteristic peaks arising from the 3-linked, 3,6-linked and terminal glucose residues. Finally, process economic analysis suggested that use of date syrup and corn steep liquor as nutrients would result in approximately 6-fold reduction in cost of raw materials for schizophyllan production as compared to conventional carbon and nitrogen sources such as sucrose and malt extract.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Low-cost agricultural substrates, Schizophyllan, Schizophyllum commune
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-195226 (URN)10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2016.07.059 (DOI)000386402900058 ()2-s2.0-84978953980 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20161117

Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3572-7798

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