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Publications (10 of 116) Show all publications
Eliasson, J., Pyddoke, R. & Swardh, J.-E. (2018). Distributional effects of taxes on car fuel, use, ownership and purchases. Economics of Transportation, 15, 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distributional effects of taxes on car fuel, use, ownership and purchases
2018 (English)In: Economics of Transportation, ISSN 2212-0122, E-ISSN 2212-0130, Vol. 15, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We analyse distributional effects of four car-related tax instruments: an increase of the fuel tax, a new kilometre tax, an increased CO2-differentiated vehicle ownership tax, and a CO2-differentiated purchase tax on new cars. Distributional effects are analysed with respect to income, lifecycle category, and spatial dimensions. The analysed taxes are progressive over most of the income distribution, but barely regressive if the highest and lowest incomes are included. However, the fraction of the population who suffer substantial welfare losses relative to income is much higher in lower income groups. We also study revenue recycling schemes; when these are included, the combined effect of tax and recycling is progressive. Considering geographical differences; rural areas carry a larger burden of fuel and vehicle taxes than urban areas, and satellites/suburbs carry a larger burden than central cities. However, rural areas are affected remarkably similar regardless of where in the country they are located.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Distributional effects, Equity effects, Fuel tax, Car ownership tax
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235110 (URN)10.1016/j.ecotra.2018.03.001 (DOI)000443458400001 ()2-s2.0-85045105994 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180919

Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Ait Ali, A., Warg, J. & Eliasson, J. (2017). Measuring the Socio-economic Benefits of Train Timetables: Application to Commuter Train Services in Stockholm. In: 20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary: . Paper presented at 20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary (pp. 849-856). Elsevier, 27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring the Socio-economic Benefits of Train Timetables: Application to Commuter Train Services in Stockholm
2017 (English)In: 20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 27, p. 849-856Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

On highly used railway lines with heterogeneous traffic, timetabling is challenging. In particular, the limited existing capacity means that to guarantee an acceptable level of quality, the infrastructure manager must cancel some train services on the expense of others. In this article, we study the conflict between commercial long-distance trains and subsidized commuter trains with a socio-economic perspective (i.e. travelers and train operators). The study attempts to answer the following question: What is the socio-economic effect of modifying the timetable of a commuter service?The case study treats the commuter train services in Stockholm. Trip data was collected from the local commuter train operator. An entropy maximization-based model was implemented to estimate the dynamic network Origin-Destination (OD) matrix. This dynamic matrix, of one full working day, was then used to estimate the number of travelers per train, and further converted for use in the microscopic simulation tool RailSys. Travel and waiting time are estimated for each OD pair and with that the generalized costs for the travelers and operators. The effect of crowding in the trains is included in the estimation. The article can be considered as an initiation to a novel method to calculate effects of changes in commuter train timetables. This novel approach enables to price commercial train slots in the capacity allocation process such as in an auction. It provides a new way to estimate the local train operator´s valuation of the different parameters (i.e. waiting, travel time and interchanges). Using RailSys for the estimation of times makes it possible to include capacity aspects that normally are difficult to reveal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Series
Transportation Research Procedia, ISSN 2352-1465 ; 27
Keywords
train timetabling; socio-economic benefits; railway simulation
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics; Transport Science; Planning and Decision Analysis; Järnvägsgruppen - Kapacitet; Järnvägsgruppen - Effektiva tågsystem för persontrafik; The KTH Railway Group - Tribology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-211534 (URN)10.1016/j.trpro.2017.12.124 (DOI)2-s2.0-85039970574 (Scopus ID)
Conference
20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary
Projects
Railway capacity allocation
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, H6675
Note

QC 20170822

Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2018-02-20Bibliographically approved
Bastian, A., Börjesson, M. & Eliasson, J. (2017). Response to Wadud and Baierl: “Explaining ‘peak car’ with economic variables: An observation”. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 95, 386-389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response to Wadud and Baierl: “Explaining ‘peak car’ with economic variables: An observation”
2017 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 95, p. 386-389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-202251 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2016.11.001 (DOI)000392768600026 ()2-s2.0-85006989971 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: Bastian, A.; Department for Transport Science, KTH Royal Institute of TechnologySweden; email: anne.bastian@abe.kth.se. QC 20170306

Available from: 2017-03-06 Created: 2017-03-06 Last updated: 2017-09-18Bibliographically approved
Cats, O., West, J. & Eliasson, J. (2016). A dynamic stochastic model for evaluating congestion and crowding effects in transit systems. Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, 89, 43-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A dynamic stochastic model for evaluating congestion and crowding effects in transit systems
2016 (English)In: Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, ISSN 0191-2615, E-ISSN 1879-2367, Vol. 89, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the most common motivations for public transport investments is to reduce congestion and increase capacity. Public transport congestion leads to crowding discomfort, denied boardings and lower service reliability. However, transit assignment models and appraisal methodologies usually do not account for the dynamics of public transport congestion and crowding and thus potentially underestimate the related benefits. This study develops a method to capture the benefits of increased capacity by using a dynamic and stochastic transit assignment model. Using an agent-based public transport simulation model, we dynamically model the evolution of network reliability and on-board crowding. The model is embedded in a comprehensive framework for project appraisal.A case study of a metro extension that partially replaces an overloaded bus network in Stockholm demonstrates that congestion effects may account for a substantial share of the expected benefits. A cost-benefit analysis based on a conventional static model will miss more than a third of the benefits. This suggests that failure to represent dynamic congestion effects may substantially underestimate the benefits of projects, especially if they are primarily intended to increase capacity rather than to reduce travel times.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Agent-based simulation, Capacity, Cost-benefit analysis, Dynamic congestion, Transit assignment, Cost benefit analysis, Cost effectiveness, Mass transportation, Stochastic systems, Travel time, Agent based simulation, Crowding effects, Network reliability, Public transport, Service reliability, Transit systems, Stochastic models
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-186912 (URN)10.1016/j.trb.2016.04.001 (DOI)000379281900003 ()2-s2.0-84963517880 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160516

Available from: 2016-05-16 Created: 2016-05-16 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Asplund, D. & Eliasson, J. (2016). Does uncertainty make cost-benefit analyses pointless?. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 92, 195-205
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does uncertainty make cost-benefit analyses pointless?
2016 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 92, p. 195-205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is widely used in public decision making on infrastructure investments. However, the demand forecasts, cost estimates, benefit valuations and effect assessments that are conducted as part of CBAs are all subject to various degrees of uncertainty. The question is to what extent CBAs, given such uncertainties, are still useful as a way to prioritize between infrastructure investments, or put differently, how robust the policy conclusions of CBA are with respect to uncertainties. Using simulations based on real data on national infrastructure plans in Sweden and Norway, we study how investment selection and total realized benefits change when decisions are based on CBA assessments subject to several different types of uncertainty. Our results indicate that realized benefits and investment selection are surprisingly insensitive to all studied types of uncertainty, even for high levels of uncertainty. The two types of uncertainty that affect results the most are uncertainties about investment cost and transport demand. Provided that decisions are based on CBA outcomes, reducing uncertainty is still worthwhile, however, because of the huge sums at stake. Even moderate reductions of uncertainties about unit values, investment costs, future demand and project effects may increase the realized benefits infrastructure investment plans by tens or hundreds of million euros. We conclude that, despite the many types of uncertainties, CBA is able to fairly consistently separate the wheat from the chaff and hence contribute to substantially improved infrastructure decisions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Cost-benefit analysis, Infrastructure investments, Uncertainty, Robustness
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-194469 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2016.08.002 (DOI)000384381700014 ()2-s2.0-84989866931 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20161031

Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-28 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Börjesson, M., Eliasson, J. & Kågesson, P. (2016). Ett gigantiskt projekt med oklart syfte: DN Debatt [Review]. Dagens nyheter (2016-01-04)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ett gigantiskt projekt med oklart syfte: DN Debatt
2016 (Swedish)In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2016-01-04Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AB Dagens nyheter, 2016
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-183018 (URN)
Note

QC 20160226

Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-24 Last updated: 2016-12-02Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, J. (2016). Is congestion pricing fair?: Consumer and citizen perspectives on equity effects. Transport Policy, 52, 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is congestion pricing fair?: Consumer and citizen perspectives on equity effects
2016 (English)In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 52, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses and analyses whether congestion charges can be considered to be “fair” in different senses of the word. Two different perspectives are distinguished: the consumer perspective and the citizen perspective. The consumer perspective is the traditional one in equity analyses, and includes changes in travel costs, travel times and so on. Using data from four European cities, I show that high-income groups pay more than low-income groups, but low-income groups pay a larger share of their income. I argue that which of these distributional measures is most appropriate depends on the purpose(s) of the charging system. The citizen perspective is about individuals’ views of social issues such as equity, procedural fairness and environmental issues. I argue that an individual can be viewed as a “winner” from a citizen perspective if a reform (such as congestion pricing) is aligned with her views of what is socially desirable. Using the same data set, I analyse to what extent different income groups “win” or “lose” from a citizen perspective – i.e., to what extent congestion pricing is aligned with the societal preferences of high- and low-income groups. It turns out that these differences are small, but overall, middle-income groups “win” the most in this sense.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Congestion charges, Congestion pricing, Consumer vs. citizen, Distributional effects, Equity effects, Fairness
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-195209 (URN)10.1016/j.tranpol.2016.06.009 (DOI)000386645000001 ()2-s2.0-84978286013 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20161118

Available from: 2016-11-18 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Souche-Le Corvec, S., Raux, C., Eliasson, J., Hamilton, C., Brundell-Freij, K., Kiiskila, K. & Tervonen, J. (2016). Predicting the results of a referendum on urban road pricing in France: "the cry of Cassandra"?. European Transport Research Review, 8(2), Article ID 15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting the results of a referendum on urban road pricing in France: "the cry of Cassandra"?
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2016 (English)In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 8, no 2, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction Abundant literature now exists on the acceptability of the new pricing measure represented by urban tolls. However, this literature contains few examples providing a "political" analysis of their introduction. Here, our aim is to study how the political behavior of individuals, identified on the basis of general attitudes regarding the principles of regulation and pricing, influences, or does not influence, attitudes with respect to urban tolls. Method We study the ex-ante determinants of a vote on urban tolls. We use the results of a survey performed in France in the framework of the European Project ExpAcc (Explanatory Factors of Road User Charging Acceptability). We process the data using a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) then perform ordered logit estimation. Result Regarding the specific question to the referendum, we show that it would be rejected by electors. We also show that there is a significant link between general attitudes to regulation by legislation, tax or pricing policies in transport on the one hand, and the vote in the referendum on tolls on the other. We confirm that individual self-interest matters a lot in political behaviour but that other types of motives also matter strongly Conclusion As a consequence, a real-life political analysis cannot be limited to classical "economic" variables, even if they matter too obviously. Lastly, our results should be placed in relation with those concerning the more global issue of the acceptability of a new pricing measure through, for example, that of the compensation to be implemented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2016
Keywords
Urban toll, Attitudes, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Ordered logit
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-189674 (URN)10.1007/s12544-016-0201-0 (DOI)000377800000004 ()2-s2.0-84971246350 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160715

Available from: 2016-07-15 Created: 2016-07-11 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Börjesson, M., Eliasson, J. & Kågeson, P. (2016). Tågens höghastighetsbanor en dålig affär för samhället: DN debatt [Review]. Dagens nyheter (2016-01-01)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tågens höghastighetsbanor en dålig affär för samhället: DN debatt
2016 (Swedish)In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2016-01-01Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AB Dagens nyheter, 2016
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-183012 (URN)
Note

QC 20160226

Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-24 Last updated: 2016-12-02Bibliographically approved
Börjesson, M., Eliasson, J. & Johnsson Hamilton, C. (2016). Why experience changes attitudes to congestion pricing: The case of Gothenburg. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 85, 1-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why experience changes attitudes to congestion pricing: The case of Gothenburg
2016 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 85, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many cities have seen public support for congestion charges increase substantially after charges have been introduced. Several alternative explanations of this phenomenon have been suggested, but so far little evidence has been available to assess the relative importance of these explanations. We study attitudes to congestion pricing in Gothenburg before and after congestion charges were introduced in January 2013. Attitudes to the charges did indeed become more positive after the introduction, just as in previous cities. Using a two-wave postal survey, we separate contributions to the attitude change from a number of sources: benefits and costs being different than anticipated, use of hypothecated revenues, reframing processes, and changes in related attitudes such as attitudes to environment, equity, taxation and pricing measures in general. We conclude that the dominant reason for the attitude change is status quo bias, rather than any substantial changes in beliefs or related attitudes, although some of these factors also contribute. Contrary to a common belief, nothing of the attitude change is due to benefits being larger than anticipated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Acceptability, Attitudes, Congestion pricing, Gothenburg
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180905 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2015.12.002 (DOI)000372942100001 ()2-s2.0-84953874723 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160129

Available from: 2016-01-29 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1789-9238

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