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Wolffsohn, J. S., Kollbaum, P. S., Berntsen, D. A., Atchison, D. A., Benavente, A., Bradley, A., . . . Naidoo, K. (2019). IMI - Clinical Myopia Control Trials and Instrumentation Report. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 60(3), M132-M160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>IMI - Clinical Myopia Control Trials and Instrumentation Report
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2019 (English)In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 60, no 3, p. M132-M160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The evidence-basis based on existing myopia control trials along with the supporting academic literature were reviewed; this informed recommendations on the outcomes suggested from clinical trials aimed at slowing myopia progression to show the effectiveness of treatments and the impact on patients. These outcomes were classified as primary (refractive error and/or axial length), secondary (patient reported outcomes and treatment compliance), and exploratory (peripheral refraction, accommodative changes, ocular alignment, pupil size, outdoor activity/lighting levels, anterior and posterior segment imaging, and tissue biomechanics). The currently available instrumentation, which the literature has shown to best achieve the primary and secondary outcomes, was reviewed and critiqued. Issues relating to study design and patient selection were also identified. These findings and consensus from the International Myopia Institute members led to final recommendations to inform future instrumentation development and to guide clinical trial protocols.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2019
Keywords
myopia control, myopia progression, clinical trial guidelines, instrumentation, recommendations
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246277 (URN)10.1167/iovs.18-25955 (DOI)000460128100007 ()30817830 (PubMedID)
Note

QC 20190325

Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
Romashchenko, D., Rosen, R. & Lundström, L. (2019). Peripheral refraction and higher order aberrations. Clinical and experimental optometry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peripheral refraction and higher order aberrations
2019 (English)In: Clinical and experimental optometry, ISSN 0816-4622, E-ISSN 1444-0938Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Peripheral image quality influences several aspects of human vision. Apart from off-axis visual functions, the manipulation of peripheral optical errors is widely used in myopia control interventions. This, together with recent technological advancements enabling the measurement of peripheral errors, has inspired many studies concerning off-axis optical aberrations. However, direct comparison between these studies is often not straightforward. To enable between-study comparisons and to summarise the current state of knowledge, this review presents population data analysed using a consistent approach from 16 studies on peripheral ocular optical quality (in total over 2,400 eyes). The presented data include refractive errors and higher order monochromatic aberrations expressed as Zernike co-efficients (reported in a subset of the studies) over the horizontal visual field. Additionally, modulation transfer functions, describing the monochromatic image quality, are calculated using individual wavefront data from three studies. The analysed data show that optical errors increase with increasing eccentricity as expected from theoretical modelling. Compared to emmetropes, myopes tend to have more hypermetropic relative peripheral refraction over the horizontal field and worse image quality in the near-periphery of the nasal visual field. The modulation transfer functions depend considerably on pupil shape (for angles larger than 30 degrees) and to some extent, the number of Zernike terms included. Moreover, modulation transfer functions calculated from the average Zernike co-efficients of a cohort are artificially inflated compared to the average of individual modulation transfer functions from the same cohort. The data collated in this review are important for the design of ocular corrections and the development and assessment of optical eye models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
myopia, ocular modulation transfer function, peripheral higher order aberrations, peripheral refraction, retinal image quality
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-256250 (URN)10.1111/cxo.12943 (DOI)000478833400001 ()31382321 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070724740 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191022

Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2019-11-05Bibliographically approved
Venkataraman, A. P., Papadogiannis, P., Romashchenko, D., Winter, S., Unsbo, P. & Lundström, L. (2019). Peripheral resolution and contrast sensitivity: effects of monochromatic and chromatic aberrations. Optical Society of America. Journal A: Optics, Image Science, and Vision, 36(4), B52-B57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peripheral resolution and contrast sensitivity: effects of monochromatic and chromatic aberrations
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2019 (English)In: Optical Society of America. Journal A: Optics, Image Science, and Vision, ISSN 1084-7529, E-ISSN 1520-8532, Vol. 36, no 4, p. B52-B57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Correction and manipulation of peripheral refractive errors are indispensable for people with central vision loss and in optical interventions for myopia control. This study investigates further enhancements of peripheral vision by compensating for monochromatic higher-order aberrations (with an adaptive optics system) and chromatic aberrations (with a narrowband green filter, 550 nm) in the 20 degrees nasal visual field. Both high-contrast detection cutoff and contrast sensitivity improved with optical correction. This improvement was most evident for gratings oriented perpendicular to the meridian due to asymmetric optical errors. When the natural monochromatic higher-order aberrations are large, resolution of 10% contrast oblique gratings can also be improved with correction of these errors. Though peripheral vision is mainly limited by refractive errors and neural factors, higher-order aberration correction beyond conventional refractive errors can still improve peripheral vision under certain circumstances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Optical Society of America, 2019
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-249861 (URN)10.1364/JOSAA.36.000B52 (DOI)000462844800008 ()
Note

QC 20190424

Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Lewis, P., Venkataraman, A. P. & Lundström, L. (2018). Contrast Sensitivity in Eyes with Central Scotoma: Effect of Stimulus Drift. Optometry and Vision Science, 95(4), 354-361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrast Sensitivity in Eyes with Central Scotoma: Effect of Stimulus Drift
2018 (English)In: Optometry and Vision Science, ISSN 1040-5488, E-ISSN 1538-9235, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 354-361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

SIGNIFICANCE: In the field of visual rehabilitation of patients with central visual field loss (CFL), knowledge on how peripheral visual function can be improved is essential. This study presents measurements of peripheral dynamic contrast sensitivity (with optical correction) for off-axis viewing angles in subjects with CFL. PURPOSE: Subjects with CFL rely on a peripheral preferred retinal locus (PRL) for many visual tasks. It is therefore important to ascertain that contrast sensitivity (CS) is maximized in the PRL. This study evaluates the effect of stimulus motion, in combination with optical correction, on CS in subjects with CFL. METHODS: The off-axis refractive errors in the PRL of five young CFL subjects were measured with a COAS open-view Hartmann-Shack aberrometer. Low-contrast (25% and 10%) and high-contrast resolution acuity for stationary gratings was assessed with and without optical correction. High-contrast resolution was also measured for gratings drifting at 7.5 Hz (within a fixed Gaussian window). Furthermore, resolution CS was evaluated for both stationary and moving gratings with optical correction for a total of two to three spatial frequencies per subject. RESULTS: High-contrast resolution acuity was relatively insensitive to stimulus drift motion of 7.5 Hz, whereas CS for gratings of 0.5 cycles per degree improved with drift for all subjects. Furthermore, both high- and low-contrast static resolution improved with optical correction. CONCLUSIONS: Just as for healthy eyes, stimulus motion of 7.5 Hz enhances CS for gratings of low spatial frequency also in the PRL of eyes with CFL. Concurrently, high-contrast resolution is unaffected by the 7.5-Hz drift but improves with off-axis optical correction. This highlights the importance of providing optimal refractive correction for subjects with CFL and that stimulus motion can be used to further enhance CS at low spatial frequencies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2018
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228286 (URN)10.1097/OPX.0000000000001195 (DOI)000431181500011 ()29561506 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044854646 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180521

Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-05-21Bibliographically approved
Papadogiannis, P., Romashchenko, D., Unsbo, P. & Lundström, L. (2018). Influence of optical defocus on peripheral vision with and without aberrations. Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the Association-for-Research-in-Vision-and-Ophthalmology (ARVO), APR 29-MAY 03, 2018, Honolulu, HI. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 59(9)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of optical defocus on peripheral vision with and without aberrations
2018 (English)In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 59, no 9Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, 2018
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235899 (URN)000442932806370 ()
Conference
Annual Meeting of the Association-for-Research-in-Vision-and-Ophthalmology (ARVO), APR 29-MAY 03, 2018, Honolulu, HI
Note

QC 20181022

Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved
Lundström, L. & Rosén, R. (2017). Peripheral aberrations. In: Handbook of Visual Optics, Volume One: Fundamentals and Eye Optics: (pp. 313-335). CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peripheral aberrations
2017 (English)In: Handbook of Visual Optics, Volume One: Fundamentals and Eye Optics, CRC Press , 2017, p. 313-335Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The schematic of Figure 21.1 is highly simplified, assuming spherical and aligned surfaces. Nevertheless, it demonstrates two important facts regarding the optical errors of the human eye: that the blur increases with the off-axis angle to the object and that it depends on the size of the pupil. For instance, spherical aberration has a cubic dependence on pupil size and coma has a quadratic dependence, whereas TCA is independent. To exemplify, Figure 21.2 shows the variation in monochromatic image quality over the visual field measured for one subject. The following paragraphs will briefly explain the origin of the four largest peripheral aberrations, namely, astigmatism, field curvature, coma, and TCA. © 2017 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CRC Press, 2017
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236848 (URN)10.1201/9781315373034 (DOI)2-s2.0-85053986746 (Scopus ID)9781482237863 (ISBN)9781482237856 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20181220

Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Van der Mooren, M., Rosen, R., Franssen, L., Lundström, L. & Piers, P. A. (2017). Prediction of contrast sensitivity in the presence of glare. Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the Association-for-Research-in-Vision-and-Ophthalmology (ARVO), MAY 07-11, 2017, Baltimore, MD. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 58(8)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediction of contrast sensitivity in the presence of glare
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2017 (English)In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 58, no 8Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2017
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-242585 (URN)000432176302355 ()
Conference
Annual Meeting of the Association-for-Research-in-Vision-and-Ophthalmology (ARVO), MAY 07-11, 2017, Baltimore, MD
Note

QC 20190227

Available from: 2019-02-27 Created: 2019-02-27 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Marcos, S., Werner, J. S., Burns, S. A., Merigan, W. H., Artal, P., Atchison, D. A., . . . Sincich, L. C. (2017). Vision science and adaptive optics, the state of the field. Vision Research, 132, 3-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vision science and adaptive optics, the state of the field
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2017 (English)In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 132, p. 3-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adaptive optics is a relatively new field, yet it is spreading rapidly and allows new questions to be asked about how the visual system is organized. The editors of this feature issue have posed a series of question to scientists involved in using adaptive optics in vision science. The questions are focused on three main areas. In the first we investigate the use of adaptive optics for psychophysical measurements of visual system function and for improving the optics of the eye. In the second, we look at the applications and impact of adaptive optics on retinal imaging and its promise for basic and applied research. In the third, we explore how adaptive optics is being used to improve our understanding of the neurophysiology of the visual system.

Keywords
Adaptive optics, Retina, Retinal physiology, Vision science
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207977 (URN)10.1016/j.visres.2017.01.006 (DOI)000396968400002 ()28212982 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014797226 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4094
Note

QC 20170607

Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Venkataraman, A. P., Winter, S., Rosén, R. & Lundström, L. (2016). Choice of grating orientation for evaluation of peripheral vision. Optometry and Vision Science, 93(6), 567-574
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choice of grating orientation for evaluation of peripheral vision
2016 (English)In: Optometry and Vision Science, ISSN 1040-5488, E-ISSN 1538-9235, Vol. 93, no 6, p. 567-574Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Peripheral resolution acuity depends on the orientation of the stimuli. However, it is uncertain if such a meridional effect also exists for peripheral detection tasks because they are affected by optical errors. Knowledge of the quantitative differences in acuity for different grating orientations is crucial for choosing the appropriate stimuli for evaluations of peripheral resolution and detection tasks. We assessed resolution and detection thresholds for different grating orientations in the peripheral visual field.

Methods: Resolution and detection thresholds were evaluated for gratings of four different orientations in eight different visual field meridians in the 20-deg visual field in white light. Detection measurements in monochromatic light (543 nm; bandwidth, 10 nm) were also performed to evaluate the effects of chromatic aberration on the meridional effect. A combination of trial lenses and adaptive optics system was used to correct the monochromatic lower- and higher-order aberrations.

Results: For both resolution and detection tasks, gratings parallel to the visual field meridian had better threshold compared with the perpendicular gratings, whereas the two oblique gratings had similar thresholds. The parallel and perpendicular grating acuity differences for resolution and detection tasks were 0.16 logMAR and 0.11 logMAD, respectively. Elimination of chromatic errors did not affect the meridional preference in detection acuity.

Conclusions: Similar to peripheral resolution, detection also shows a meridional effect that appears to have a neural origin. The threshold difference seen for parallel and perpendicular gratings suggests the use of two oblique gratings as stimuli in alternative forced-choice procedures for peripheral vision evaluation to reduce measurement variation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keywords
grating orientation, peripheral vision, resolution, detection, meridional effect, psychophysics, forced-choice procedure
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-186323 (URN)10.1097/OPX.0000000000000832 (DOI)000377852500003 ()26889822 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4094
Note

QC 20160511

Available from: 2016-05-10 Created: 2016-05-10 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Lundström, L., Venkataraman, A. P., Lewis, P. R. & Unsbo, P. (2016). Spatiotemporal contrast sensitivity in the 10 degrees visual field. Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the Association-for-Research-in-Vision-and-Ophthalmology (ARVO), MAY 01-05, 2016, Seattle, WA. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 57(12)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatiotemporal contrast sensitivity in the 10 degrees visual field
2016 (English)In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2016
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-204140 (URN)000394210603361 ()
Conference
Annual Meeting of the Association-for-Research-in-Vision-and-Ophthalmology (ARVO), MAY 01-05, 2016, Seattle, WA
Note

QC 20170328

Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4894-7944

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