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Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Sánchez, C. G., Figueiredo, R. A., Figueiredo, F. A., Sánchez, E. M., Arauzo, J., Callejo, A. G. & Zanzi Vigouroux, R. (2015). Liquid products characterization from pyrolysis and gasification: How can it be classified?. In: Innovative Solutions in Fluid-Particle Systems and Renewable Energy Management: (pp. 167-198). IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liquid products characterization from pyrolysis and gasification: How can it be classified?
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2015 (English)In: Innovative Solutions in Fluid-Particle Systems and Renewable Energy Management, IGI Global , 2015, p. 167-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter there is described a tentative of obtain and characterize pyrolysis liquids from cashew nut shell, using a suggested classification of tars. The large amount of tar definitions and measurement methods, as well as the wide spectrum of organic compounds, makes it almost impossible to capture "tars" with a clear definition. And so, in order to facilitate the study of the evolution of liquid fraction composition, the compounds have been grouped according to their chemical nature, but differently from other works, it was extended the range of compounds in order to evaluate the influence of the reactor parameters in liquid fraction compositions. It is described, as well, the pyrolysis and gasification of cashew nut shell, that has been studied in a laboratory scale reactor. It was quantified and classified the production of liquids (tar) and evaluated the final temperature influence (800, 900 and 1000 °C) and the use of N2 in pyrolysis case, and a mixture of N2 and steam or air in the gasification case. Finally, it is described the identification and quantification of tar compositions, by CG-MS and CG-FID analyzes. Around 50 different compounds have been detected in the liquid fraction obtained, most of them being present at very low concentrations and it is observed that in the pyrolysis and gasification processes, phenol and benzene were the major chemical groups, and this fact agree with others works, presented here in a bibliographic revision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IGI Global, 2015
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-187147 (URN)10.4018/978-1-4666-8711-0.ch006 (DOI)2-s2.0-84957976304 (Scopus ID)9781466687127 (ISBN)9781466687110 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20160517

Available from: 2016-05-17 Created: 2016-05-17 Last updated: 2016-05-17Bibliographically approved
Marquez-Montesino, F., Correa-Mendez, F., Glauco-Sanchez, C., Zanzi-Vigouroux, R., Guadalupe Rutiaga-Quinones, J. & Aguiar-Trujillo, L. (2015). Pyrolytic Degradation Studies of Acacia mangium wood. BioResources, 10(1), 1825-1844
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pyrolytic Degradation Studies of Acacia mangium wood
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2015 (English)In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1825-1844Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pyrolytic degradation of Acacia mangium wood was studied. The chemical composition of biomass, immediate and elemental analyses and calorific value for biomass and char, were determined. The standard and the derivative curve thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG) were obtained. Devolatilization maximum of values between 250 +/- 20 degrees C and 380 +/- 20 degrees C were observed, with completion after 2 h, which confirms the selection of 2 hours for pyrolysis. Kinetic study was performed at different heating rates for a conversion rate from 20% to 80%. Average values of activation energy for temperature in degrees K of 228.57 kJ/mol for Biomass 1 and 199.36 kJ/mol for Biomass 2 were obtained by the isoconversion method of FWO. The lower value of activation energy for Biomass 2 was related to the possible catalytic activity of ash. The values of correlation coefficient from 0.9418 to 0.9946 for Biomass 1 and from 0.8706 to 0.9918 for Biomass 2, indicate the reliability of the first-order reaction model. The caloric values obtained were: Biomass 1 (16962 kJ/kg), Biomass 2 (16974 kJ/kg), chars from Biomass 1 (between 23731 y 26 942 kJ/kg) and gas from Biomass 1 and Biomass 2 (3858.7 and 4859.4 kJ/m(3), respectively).

Keywords
Analysis, Biomass, Kinetic, Pyrolysis, Thermogravimetry
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-166359 (URN)10.15376/biores.10.1.1825-1844 (DOI)000351941000144 ()2-s2.0-84923674211 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150508

Available from: 2015-05-08 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2020-03-05Bibliographically approved
Coronado, C. R., Tuna, C. E., Zanzi, R., Vane, L. F. & Silveira, J. L. (2014). Development of a thermoeconomic methodology for optimizing biodiesel production. Part II: Manufacture exergetic cost and biodiesel production cost incorporating carbon credits, a Brazilian case study. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 29, 565-572
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a thermoeconomic methodology for optimizing biodiesel production. Part II: Manufacture exergetic cost and biodiesel production cost incorporating carbon credits, a Brazilian case study
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2014 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 29, p. 565-572Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to carry on a thermoeconomic analysis at a biodiesel production plant considering the irreversibilities in each step (part I: biodiesel plant under study and functional thermoeconomic diagram [1]), making it possible to calculate the thermoeconomic cost in US$/kWh and US$/1 of the biodiesel production, and the main byproduct generated, glycerin, incorporating the credits for the CO2 that is not emitted into the atmosphere (carbon credits). Assuming a sale price for both the biodiesel and the byproduct (glycerin), the annual revenue of the total investment in a plant with a capacity of 8000 t/year of biodiesel operating at 8000 h/year was calculated. The variables that directly or indirectly influence the final thermoeconomic cost include total annual biodiesel production, hours of operation, manufacturing exergy cost, molar ratio in the transesterification reaction, reaction temperature and pressure in the process. Depending on the increase or decrease in sale prices for both biodiesel and glycerin, the payback is going to significantly increase or decrease. It is evident that, in exergy terms, the sale of glycerin is of vital importance in order to reduce the biodiesel price, getting a shorter payback period for the plant under study.

Keywords
Thermoeconomic analysis, Biodiesel, Exergetic costs, Glycerin, Scenarios
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-141319 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2013.08.064 (DOI)000329892100046 ()2-s2.0-84884840307 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20140214

Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Silveira, J. L., Martinelli, V. J., Vane, L. F., Freire Junior, J. C., Zanzi Vigouroux, R. A., Tuna, C. E., . . . Silva Paulino, R. F. (2014). Incorporation of hydrogen production process in a sugar cane industry: Steam reforming of ethanol. Applied Thermal Engineering, 71(1), 94-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incorporation of hydrogen production process in a sugar cane industry: Steam reforming of ethanol
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2014 (English)In: Applied Thermal Engineering, ISSN 1359-4311, E-ISSN 1873-5606, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 94-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work presents a technical, ecological and economic analysis of hydrogen production incorporation through ethanol steam reforming at a traditional sugarcane industry (sugar, ethanol). This proposal is reached through a reduction in the amount of fuel (bagasse) that is normally utilized to generate electricity without affecting the sugar and ethanol production processes, however. This surplus bagasse is utilized to produce steam for hydrogen production. In order to achieve this, it is calculated the available bagasse and maximum hydrogen amount and their inputs (hydrated and anhydrous ethanol). Based on the aforementioned, the investment needs are estimated, where the operation and maintenance cost, the operation period, the interest rate, and the annuity are considered. The incorporation of this new process is assessed through a comparison of this innovative plant with the traditional ones.

Keywords
Cogeneration system, Hydrogen production, Sugar cane bagasse, Sugar cane industry
National Category
Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158327 (URN)10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2014.06.032 (DOI)000345490600012 ()2-s2.0-84904168871 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150126

Available from: 2015-01-26 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Mendiburu, A. Z., Carvalho, J. A. ., Zanzi, R., Coronado, C. R. & Silveira, J. L. (2014). Thermochemical equilibrium modeling of a biomass downdraft gasifier: Constrained and unconstrained non-stoichiometric models. Energy, 71, 624-637
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermochemical equilibrium modeling of a biomass downdraft gasifier: Constrained and unconstrained non-stoichiometric models
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2014 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 71, p. 624-637Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this work is to develop a non-stoichiometric equilibrium model to study parameter effects in the gasification process of a feedstock in downdraft gasifiers. The non-stoichiometric equilibrium model is also known as the Gibbs free energy minimization method. Four models were developed and tested. First a pure non-stoichiometric equilibrium model called M1 was developed; then the methane content was constrained by correlating experimental data and generating the model M2. A kinetic constraint that determines the apparent gasification rate was considered for model M3 and finally the two aforementioned constraints were implemented together in model M4. Models M2 and M4 showed to be the more accurate among the four developed models with mean RMS (root mean square error) values of 1.25 each. Also the gasification of Brazilian Pinus elliottii in a downdraft gasifier with air as gasification agent was studied. The input parameters considered were: (a) equivalence ratio (0.28-035); (b) moisture content (5-20%); (c) gasification time (30-120 min) and carbon conversion efficiency (80-100%).

Keywords
Gasification, Modeling, Non-stoichiometric, Constrained
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-148350 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2014.05.010 (DOI)000338388000056 ()2-s2.0-84902537673 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20140805

Available from: 2014-08-05 Created: 2014-08-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Coronado, C. R., Tuna, C. E., Zanzi, R., Vane, L. F. & Silveira, J. L. (2013). Development of a thermoeconomic methodology for the optimization of biodiesel production-Part I: Biodiesel plant and thermoeconomic functional diagram. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 23, 138-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a thermoeconomic methodology for the optimization of biodiesel production-Part I: Biodiesel plant and thermoeconomic functional diagram
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2013 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 23, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work developed a methodology that uses the thermoeconomic functional diagram applied for allocating the cost of products produced by a biodiesel plant. The first part of this work discusses some definitions of exergy and thermoeconomy, with a detailed description of the biodiesel plant studied, identification of the system functions through Physical Diagram, calculation of the irreversibilities of the plant, construction of the Thermoeconomic Functional Diagram and determination of the expressions for the plant's exergetic functions. In order to calculate the exergetic increments and the physical exergy of certain flows in each step, the Chemical Engineering Simulation Software "HYSYS 3.2" was used. The equipments that have the highest irreversibilities in the plant were identified after the exergy calculation. It was also found that the lowest irreversibility in the system refers to the process with a molar ratio of 6:1 and a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C in the transesterification process. In the second part of this. work (Part II), it was calculated the thermoeconomic cost of producing biodiesel and related products, including the costs of carbon credits for the CO2 that is not released into the atmosphere, when a percentage of biodiesel is added to the petroleum diesel used by Brazil's internal diesel fleet (case study).

National Category
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-124573 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2013.02.015 (DOI)000319789600011 ()2-s2.0-84875477671 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20130712

Available from: 2013-07-12 Created: 2013-07-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Herrera, I., Ruyck, J. D., Ocaña, V., Zanzi, R., Núñez, V. & Thewys, T. (2013). Environmental impact assessment of decentralized generation of heat and power in Santa Clara city, Cuba. In: Proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2013: . Paper presented at 26th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2013, 16 July 2013 through 19 July 2013, Guilin, China. China International Conference Center for Science and Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental impact assessment of decentralized generation of heat and power in Santa Clara city, Cuba
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2013, China International Conference Center for Science and Technology , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the last two centuries, population and resources consumption, including energy, have experienced a great expansion, which has led to a rapid increase in the scale of the anthropogenic impact on the environment. Some of the most visible anthropogenic impacts are those related to the use of fossil energy, since it provides about 87% of the worldwide energy demand. Fossil fuels combustion causes large emissions of atmospheric pollutants, which have been demonstrated to cause damages to a wide range of receptors, including human health, natural ecosystems, and the built environment. In Cuba fossil fuels represent roughly 89% of the total energy used, from this amount, about 4 229 thousands toe (46% of the fossil fuels consumption) are used for power generation and 2 273 thousands toe (25% of the fossil fuels consumption) are used for heat generation. An important fraction (about 25%) of the fuel devoted to generate electricity is consumed in Decentralized Power Stations (DPS), some of them located in highly populated areas, and a similar situation occurs with some heat generation facilities. These circumstances are probably the reason why air quality in several cities has become a visible problem, due to pollutant gas emissions. In this way the impacts related to these facilities require a detailed analysis; especially human health impacts due to the incremental exposure to polluting gases. This paper presents an environmental impact analysis in Santa Clara City. The study include four DPS, with a total installed power of 84 MW, and ten heat generation facilities, with a total installed capacity of 16.3 MW. With this purpose an Integrated Assessment of Energy Supply (IAES), based on the state of the art in engineering, dispersion models, air quality and epidemiology was carried out. This includes a perturbations analysis to reduce the negative impacts with low investment actions. The baseline and two other scenario scenarios were studied. It was demonstrated that northwest DPS cause the highest local impact in terms of years of life lost due to incremental air pollutants concentrations. The most affected areas were identified in the northwest and southwest of the city. It was determined a potential impacts on health reduction about 13%, and to reduce greenhouse gases emissions from heat generation facilities about 10%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
China International Conference Center for Science and Technology, 2013
Keywords
Air pollution, Heat and power, Mitigation actions
National Category
Environmental Sciences Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-151084 (URN)2-s2.0-84903650104 (Scopus ID)
Conference
26th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2013, 16 July 2013 through 19 July 2013, Guilin, China
Note

QC 20140915

Available from: 2014-09-15 Created: 2014-09-15 Last updated: 2014-09-15Bibliographically approved
Endalew, A. K., Kiros, Y. & Zanzi, R. (2011). Heterogeneous catalysis for biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas oil (JCO). Energy, 36(5), 2693-2700
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heterogeneous catalysis for biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas oil (JCO)
2011 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 2693-2700Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work focuses on the development of heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production from high free fatty acid (FFA) containing Jatropha curcas oil (KO). Solid base and acid catalysts were prepared and tested for transesterification in a batch reactor under mild reaction conditions. Mixtures of solid base and acid catalysts were also tested for single-step simultaneous esterification and transesterification. More soap formation was found to be the main problem for calcium oxide (CaO) and lithium doped calcium oxide (Li-CaO) catalysts during the reaction of jatropha oil and methanol than for the rapeseed oil (RSO). CaO with Li doping showed increased conversion to biodiesel than bare CaO as a catalyst. La(2)O(3)/ZnO, La(2)O(3)/Al(2)O(3) and La(0.1)Ca(0.9)MnO(3) catalysts were also tested and among them La(2)O(3)-ZnO showed higher activity. Mixture of solid base catalysts (CaO and Li-CaO)and solid acid catalyst (Fe(2)(SO(4))(3)) were found to give complete conversion to biodiesel in a single-step simultaneous esterification and transesterification process. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Jatropha curcas oil (JCO), Heterogeneous catalysts, Biodiesel, Transesterification, Simultaneous esterification
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-39060 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2011.02.010 (DOI)000291411400041 ()2-s2.0-79955648152 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-07 Created: 2011-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Endalew, A. K., Kiros, Y. & Zanzi, R. (2011). Inorganic heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production from vegetable oils. Biomass and Bioenergy, 35(9), 3787-3809
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inorganic heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production from vegetable oils
2011 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 3787-3809Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biofuels are renewable solutions to replace the ever dwindling energy reserves and environmentally pollutant fossil liquid fuels when they are produced from low cost sustainable feedstocks. Biodiesel is mainly produced from vegetable oils or animal fats by the method of transesterification reaction using catalysts. Homogeneous catalysts are conventionally used for biodiesel production. Unfortunately, homogeneous catalysts are associated with problems which might increase the cost of production due to separation steps and emission of waste water. Inorganic heterogeneous catalysts are potentially low cost and can solve many of the problems encountered in homogeneous catalysts. Many solid acid and base inorganic catalysts have been studied for the transesterification of various vegetables oils. The work of many researchers on the development of active, tolerant to water and free fatty acids (FFA), as well as stable inorganic catalysts for biodiesel production from vegetable oils are reviewed and discussed.

Keywords
Biodiesel, Edible and non-edible oils, Inorganic heterogeneous catalysts, Free fatty acids, Transesterification
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-42366 (URN)10.1016/j.biombioe.2011.06.011 (DOI)000294939100005 ()2-s2.0-79961128514 (Scopus ID)
Note
QC 20111010Available from: 2011-10-10 Created: 2011-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Zanzi Vigouroux, R., Birbas, D. & Márquez Montesino, F. (2011). Preparation of Activated Carbon: Forest residues activated with Phosphoric Acid and ZincSulfate. In: VII EDICIÓN DE LA CONFERENCIA CIENTÍFICA INTERNACIONAL MEDIOAMBIENTE SIGLO XXI, MAS XXI 2011. Paper presented at VII EDICIÓN DE LA CONFERENCIA CIENTÍFICA INTERNACIONAL MEDIOAMBIENTE SIGLO XXI, MAS XXI 2011, Santa Clara, Cuba, Noviembre 2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparation of Activated Carbon: Forest residues activated with Phosphoric Acid and ZincSulfate
2011 (English)In: VII EDICIÓN DE LA CONFERENCIA CIENTÍFICA INTERNACIONAL MEDIOAMBIENTE SIGLO XXI, MAS XXI 2011, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation. The selected biomass used as precursor is sawdust from both Cuban and Swedish Pine tree. Phosphoric acid and Zinc Sulphate are the chemical reagents. The objective is to study the influence of acid concentration, impregnation ratio and activation temperature on adsorption performance of the obtained activated carbon.

The experiments with phosphoric acid activation show that treatment with 40% acid concentration at 400 °C produce an activated carbon with good properties for ammonia adsorption and good iodine number. If a 30% phosphoric acid is used for activation, an activation temperature of 500 °C is recommended. With an impregnation ratio of 1, good adsorption was obtained in the activated carbon produced from Swedish pine while using Cuban pine a higher adsorption was obtained with an impregnation ratio of 2.

The experiments with Zinc Sulphate activation show that activation conditions of 20% zinc sulphate concentration, 400 °C and impregnation ratio: 1 are enough to produce an activated carbon with good properties for ammonia adsorption. The adsorption of carbon tetrachloride was lower. Activated carbons produced with 10 % zinc sulphate concentration, 0.5 impregnation ratio and 400 °C activation temperature (the mildest studied conditions) show already good iodine number and BET surface area.    

National Category
Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-73355 (URN)
Conference
VII EDICIÓN DE LA CONFERENCIA CIENTÍFICA INTERNACIONAL MEDIOAMBIENTE SIGLO XXI, MAS XXI 2011, Santa Clara, Cuba, Noviembre 2011
Note
QC 20120206Available from: 2012-02-06 Created: 2012-02-02 Last updated: 2012-02-06Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1664-0278

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