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Publications (10 of 64) Show all publications
Tympakianaki, A., Koutsopoulos, H. N., Jenelius, E. & Cebecauer, M. (2018). Impact analysis of transport network disruptions using multimodal data: A case study for tunnel closures in Stockholm. Case Studies on Transport Policy, 6(2), 179-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact analysis of transport network disruptions using multimodal data: A case study for tunnel closures in Stockholm
2018 (English)In: Case Studies on Transport Policy, ISSN 2213-624X, E-ISSN 2213-6258, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 179-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper explores the utilization of heterogeneous data sources to analyze the multimodal impacts of transport network disruptions. A systematic data-driven approach is proposed for the analysis of impacts with respect to two aspects: (a) spatiotemporal network changes, and (b) multimodal effects. The feasibility and benefits of combining various data sources are demonstrated through a case study for a tunnel in Stockholm, Sweden which is often prone to closures. Several questions are addressed including the identification of impacted areas, and the evaluation of impacts on network performance, demand patterns and performance of the public transport system. The results indicate significant impact of tunnel closures on the network traffic conditions due to the redistribution of vehicles on alternative paths. Effects are also found on the performance of public transport. Analysis of the demand reveals redistribution of traffic during the tunnel closures, consistent with the observed impacts on network performance. Evidence for redistribution of travelers to public transport is observed as a potential effect of the closures. Better understanding of multimodal impacts of a disruption can assist authorities in their decision-making process to apply adequate traffic management policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2018
Keywords
Transport system disruptions, Data-driven analysis
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231201 (URN)10.1016/j.cstp.2018.05.003 (DOI)000434260300001 ()2-s2.0-85047071116 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180629

Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Fu, J., Jenelius, E. & Koutsopoulos, H. N. (2017). Identification of workstations in earthwork operations from vehicle GPS data. Automation in Construction, 83, 237-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of workstations in earthwork operations from vehicle GPS data
2017 (English)In: Automation in Construction, ISSN 0926-5805, E-ISSN 1872-7891, Vol. 83, p. 237-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper proposes a methodology for the identification of workstations in earthwork operations based on GPS traces from construction vehicles. The model incorporates relevant information extracted from the GPS data to infer locations of different workstations as probability distributions over the environment. Monitoring of workstation locations may support map inference for generating and continuously updating the layout and road network topology of the construction environment. A case study is conducted at a complex earthwork site in Sweden. The workstation identification methodology is used to infer the locations of loading stations based on vehicle speeds and interactions between vehicles, and the locations of dumping stations based on vehicle turning patterns. The results show that the proposed method is able to identify workstations in the earthwork environment efficiently and in sufficient detail.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017
Keywords
Earthwork operations, Global Positioning System (GPS), Location detection, Probabilistic model, Kernel density estimation
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-215781 (URN)10.1016/j.autcon.2017.08.023 (DOI)000411533400020 ()2-s2.0-85027503397 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171023

Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2017-10-23Bibliographically approved
Fu, J. & Jenelius, E. (2017). Transport efficiency of off-peak urban goods deliveries: A Stockholm pilot study. In: : . Paper presented at the 96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB). Transportation Research Board
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transport efficiency of off-peak urban goods deliveries: A Stockholm pilot study
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Transportation Research Board, 2017
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200587 (URN)
Conference
the 96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB)
Note

QC 20170130

Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-01-30 Last updated: 2017-03-22Bibliographically approved
Rahmani, M., Koutsopoulos, H. N. & Jenelius, E. (2017). Travel time estimation from sparse floating car data with consistent path inference: A fixed point approach. Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, 85, 628-643
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Travel time estimation from sparse floating car data with consistent path inference: A fixed point approach
2017 (English)In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, ISSN 0968-090X, E-ISSN 1879-2359, Vol. 85, p. 628-643Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Estimation of urban network link travel times from sparse floating car data (FCD) usually needs pre-processing, mainly map-matching and path inference for finding the most likely vehicle paths that are consistent with reported locations. Path inference requires a priori assumptions about link travel times; using unrealistic initial link travel times can bias the travel time estimation and subsequent identification of shortest paths. Thus, the combination of path inference and travel time estimation is a joint problem. This paper investigates the sensitivity of estimated travel times, and proposes a fixed point formulation of the simultaneous path inference and travel time estimation problem. The methodology is applied in a case study to estimate travel times from taxi FCD in Stockholm, Sweden. The results show that standard fixed point iterations converge quickly to a solution where input and output travel times are consistent. The solution is robust under different initial travel times assumptions and data sizes. Validation against actual path travel time measurements from the Google API and an instrumented vehicle deployed for this purpose shows that the fixed point algorithm improves shortest path finding. The results highlight the importance of the joint solution of the path inference and travel time estimation problem, in particular for accurate path finding and route optimization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Fixed point problem, Floating car data, Path inference, Travel time estimation
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-218115 (URN)10.1016/j.trc.2017.10.012 (DOI)000423006600033 ()2-s2.0-85033608912 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration
Note

QC 20171124

Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-02-09Bibliographically approved
Jenelius, E., Kristoffersson, I. & Fransson, M. (2017). Validation of Traffic Simulation Models Based on the Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram. In: 20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary: . Paper presented at 20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary (pp. 561-568). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of Traffic Simulation Models Based on the Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram
2017 (English)In: 20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary, Elsevier, 2017, p. 561-568Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Urban traffic simulation models could benefit significantly from new validation methods with potential to reduce the time-consuming calibration and validation work needed before application of the model to evaluate city infrastructure or policy implementations. Current practice is to validate simulation models locally through comparison with point flow measurements and travel times on some important routes. However, for many applications, the level of congestion in an entire area is important. During the last decade, several studies have found empirical evidence of a relation between flow and density on city district level, the existence of a so-called macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD). This paper shows how the MFD can be used to validate results from a traffic simulation model for a city district. Furthermore, the paper shows empirical results for Stockholm, Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Empirical Analysis, Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram, Model Validation, Traffic Simulation Model
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-222080 (URN)10.1016/j.trpro.2017.12.073 (DOI)2-s2.0-85039958859 (Scopus ID)
Conference
20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary
Note

QC 20180131

Available from: 2018-01-31 Created: 2018-01-31 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved
Jenelius, E., Kristoffersson, I. & Fransson, M. (2017). Validation of Traffic Simulation Models Based onthe Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram. In: : . Paper presented at 20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary. Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of Traffic Simulation Models Based onthe Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Urban traffic simulation models could benefit significantly from new validation methods with potential to reduce the time-consuming calibration and validation work needed before application of the model to evaluate city infrastructure or policy implementations. Current practice is to validate simulation models locally through comparison with point flow measurements and travel times on some important routes. However, for many applications, the level of congestion in an entire area is important. During the last decade, several studies have found empirical evidence of a relation between flow and density on city district level, the existence of a so-called macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD). This paper shows how the MFD can be used to validate results from a traffic simulation model for a city district. Furthermore, the paper shows empirical results for Stockholm, Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Traffic Simulation Model; Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram; Model Validation; Empirical Analysis
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Transport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214535 (URN)
Conference
20th EURO Working Group on Transportation Meeting, EWGT 2017, 4-6 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary
Projects
Dynamiska trängselindex och adaptiva trängselavgifter
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, TRV 2015/5784
Note

QC 20170920

Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2017-09-20Bibliographically approved
Laskaris, G., Cats, O., Jenelius, E. & Viti, F. (2016). A real-time holding decision rule accounting for passenger travel cost. In: 2016 IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC): . Paper presented at 2016 IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC) (pp. 2410-2415). IEEE conference proceedings
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A real-time holding decision rule accounting for passenger travel cost
2016 (English)In: 2016 IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC), IEEE conference proceedings, 2016, p. 2410-2415Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Holding has been extensively investigated as a strategy to mitigate the inherently stochastic nature of public transport operations. Holding focuses on either regulating vehicle headways using a rule-based approach or minimizing passenger travel cost by employing optimization models. This paper introduces a holding decision rule that explicitly addresses passenger travel cost. The decision to hold relies on the passenger demand distribution along the line. The passenger cost holding rule is tested using simulation for a high frequency bus line in Stockholm, Sweden and is compared with a no-control scheme and the currently used headway-based strategy. The results indicate that the new decision rule results in relatively minor reductions of passenger cost compared to the currently adopted strategy, and that it allocates the greatest share of holding time at the beginning of the route.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE conference proceedings, 2016
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200550 (URN)10.1109/ITSC.2016.7795944 (DOI)000392215500377 ()2-s2.0-85010076113 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2016 IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC)
Note

QC 20170130

Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-01-30 Last updated: 2017-02-27Bibliographically approved
Cats, O. & Jenelius, E. (2016). Beyond a complete failure: The impact of partial capacity degradation on public transport network vulnerability. Transportmetrica B: Transport Dynamics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond a complete failure: The impact of partial capacity degradation on public transport network vulnerability
2016 (English)In: Transportmetrica B: Transport Dynamics, ISSN 2168-0566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disruptions in public transport networks (PTNs) often lead to partial capacity reductions rather than complete closures. This study aims to move beyond the vulnerability analysis of complete failures by investigating the impacts of a range of capacity reductions on PTN performance. The relation between network performance and the degradation of line or link capacities is investigated by establishing a vulnerability curve and related metrics. The analysis framework is applied to a full-scan analysis of planned temporary line-level capacity reductions and an analysis of unplanned link-level capacity reductions on the most central segments in the multi-modal rapid PTN of Stockholm, Sweden. The impacts of capacity reductions are assessed using a non-equilibrium dynamic public transport operations and assignment model. The nonlinear properties of on-board crowding, denied boarding, network effects and route choice result in non-trivial, generally convex, relations which carry implications on disruption planning and real-time management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Network vulnerability, disruption, capacity, public transport
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200542 (URN)10.1080/21680566.2016.1267596 (DOI)000425810200002 ()2-s2.0-85006124214 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170130

Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-01-30 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Fu, J., Jenelius, E. & Haris, K. (2016). Driving time and path generation for heavy construction sites from GPS traces. In: IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems, Proceedings, ITSC: . Paper presented at 19th IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems, ITSC 2016; Windsor Oceanico HotelRio de Janeiro; Brazil; 1 November 2016 - 4 November 2016 (pp. 1141-1146). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Driving time and path generation for heavy construction sites from GPS traces
2016 (English)In: IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems, Proceedings, ITSC, IEEE, 2016, p. 1141-1146Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper presents a methodology for using GPS probe data to automatically extract the driving time between workstations and build a detailed representation of the paths between workstations in a construction environment. The inferred driving time distribution is aimed as input to construction simulation models to assess fleet performance, while the path information can be utilized to examine the performance of individual vehicles. A case study, using GPS data collected from a construction site, is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach. The GPS data are processed without any prior knowledge about the underlying work environment. The results show that the proposed approach is capable of accurately inferring the driving time distribution and the paths between workstations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2016
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200584 (URN)10.1109/ITSC.2016.7795700 (DOI)000392215500179 ()2-s2.0-85010061504 (Scopus ID)9781509018895 (ISBN)
Conference
19th IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems, ITSC 2016; Windsor Oceanico HotelRio de Janeiro; Brazil; 1 November 2016 - 4 November 2016
Note

QC 20170130

Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-01-30 Last updated: 2017-03-22Bibliographically approved
Fu, J., Jenelius, E. & Koutsopoulos, H. (2016). Identification of workstations in earthwork operations from vehicle GPS data. In: : . Paper presented at Transportation Research Board 95th Annual Meeting. Transportation Research Board
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of workstations in earthwork operations from vehicle GPS data
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increasing availability and the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) devices open great opportunities for various transportation applications. The authors propose a generative probabilistic model for extraction of locations of workstations in earthwork operations using raw GPS traces from construction vehicles. The probabilistic model incorporates the GPS measurements with relevant information extracted from the GPS data to compute locations of different workstations as probability distribution over the environment. The location of workstations will be used as a part of a map inference method for generating and continuously updating the layout and road network topology of the construction environment. A detailed case study was conducted with construction equipment at a complex site. The authors first demonstrate the probabilistic model to extract the locations of loading stations using vehicle speed and interactions among vehicles, and then to discover dumping stations with help of vehicle moving patterns. The results from the experiment show that the proposed method is able to discover important places and workstations for earthwork environment efficiently and in sufficient details.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Transportation Research Board, 2016
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200576 (URN)
Conference
Transportation Research Board 95th Annual Meeting
Note

QC 20170201

Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-01-30 Last updated: 2017-03-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4106-3126

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