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Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Boman, M. (2019). Artificial Intelligence in Cities of the Future: Viable Cities Report 2019:1. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artificial Intelligence in Cities of the Future: Viable Cities Report 2019:1
2019 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2019. p. 20
Series
Viable Cities Report 2019: 1, Foresight Technical Report
Keywords
Viable Cities, artificial intelligence, cities, future
National Category
Environmental Sciences Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-244994 (URN)978-91-7899-002-3 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20190305

Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Boman, M. & Heger, T. (2019). Circles of Impression: External Foresight in Global Enterprises. In: D. A. Schreiber and Z. L. Berge (Ed.), Futures Thinking and Organizational Policy: (pp. 179-199). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circles of Impression: External Foresight in Global Enterprises
2019 (English)In: Futures Thinking and Organizational Policy / [ed] D. A. Schreiber and Z. L. Berge, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 179-199Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260771 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-94923-9_9 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-09-30
Boman, M., ben Abdesslem, F., Forsell, E., Gillblad, D., Görnerup, O., Isacsson, N., . . . Kaldo, V. (2019). Learning machines in Internet-delivered psychological treatment. Progress in artificial intelligence
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning machines in Internet-delivered psychological treatment
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Progress in artificial intelligenceArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260808 (URN)10.1007/s13748-019-00192-0 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-09-30
Harz, D. & Boman, M. (2019). The scalability of trustless trust. In: 22nd International Conference on Financial Cryptography and Data Security, FC 2018: . Paper presented at 22nd International Conference on Financial Cryptography and Data Security, FC 2018; Nieuwpoort; Netherlands; 26 February 2018 through 2 March 2018 (pp. 279-293). Springer, 10958
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The scalability of trustless trust
2019 (English)In: 22nd International Conference on Financial Cryptography and Data Security, FC 2018, Springer, 2019, Vol. 10958, p. 279-293Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Permission-less blockchains can realise trustless trust, albeit at the cost of limiting the complexity of computation tasks. To explain the implications for scalability, we have implemented a trust model for smart contracts, described as agents in an open multi-agent system. Agent intentions are not necessarily known and autonomous agents have to be able to make decisions under risk. The ramifications of these general conditions for scalability are analysed for Ethereum and then generalised to other current and future platforms. Finally, mechanisms from the trust model are applied to a verifiable computation algorithm and implemented in the Ethereum blockchain. We show in experiments that the algorithm needs at most six semi-honest verifiers to detect false submission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), ISSN 0302-9743 ; 10958
Keywords
Agent, Blockchain, Distributed ledger, Ethereum, Multi-agent system, Scalability, Smart contract, Trustless trust
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-251905 (URN)10.1007/978-3-662-58820-8_19 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063467913 (Scopus ID)9783662588192 (ISBN)
Conference
22nd International Conference on Financial Cryptography and Data Security, FC 2018; Nieuwpoort; Netherlands; 26 February 2018 through 2 March 2018
Note

QC 20190527r

Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Boman, M., Sahlgren, M., Görnerup, O. & Gillblad, D. (2018). Learning Machines. In: Learning, Inference and Control of Multi-Agent Systems: . Paper presented at AAAI Spring Symposium Series (pp. 610-613).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning Machines
2018 (English)In: Learning, Inference and Control of Multi-Agent Systems, 2018, p. 610-613Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260804 (URN)
Conference
AAAI Spring Symposium Series
Note

QC 20191104

Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-11-04Bibliographically approved
Borlenghi, S., Boman, M. & Delin, A. (2018). Modeling reservoir computing with the discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation. Physical review. E, 98(5), Article ID 052101.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling reservoir computing with the discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation
2018 (English)In: Physical review. E, ISSN 2470-0045, E-ISSN 2470-0053, Vol. 98, no 5, article id 052101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We formulate, using the discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation (DNLS), a general approach to encode and process information based on reservoir computing. Reservoir computing is a promising avenue for realizing neuromorphic computing devices. In such computing systems, training is performed only at the output level by adjusting the output from the reservoir with respect to a target signal. In our formulation, the reservoir can be an arbitrary physical system, driven out of thermal equilibrium by an external driving. The DNLS is a general oscillator model with broad application in physics, and we argue that our approach is completely general and does not depend on the physical realization of the reservoir. The driving, which encodes the object to be recognized, acts as a thermodynamic force, one for each node in the reservoir. Currents associated with these thermodynamic forces in turn encode the output signal from the reservoir. As an example, we consider numerically the problem of supervised learning for pattern recognition, using as a reservoir a network of nonlinear oscillators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER PHYSICAL SOC, 2018
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239083 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevE.98.052101 (DOI)000448929900001 ()2-s2.0-85056391374 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, STEM P40147-1Swedish Research Council, VR 2016-05980Swedish Research Council, VR 2016-01961Swedish Research Council, VR 2015-04608
Note

QC 20181121

Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Gullström, C. & Boman, M. (2015). Analogue Friday 1: Thumbs Up! and Analogue Friday 2: InstaYum!: Impact event and film production.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analogue Friday 1: Thumbs Up! and Analogue Friday 2: InstaYum!: Impact event and film production
2015 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

As part of a public dissemination impact activity within the Mediating Presence project of EIT ICT Labs in 2013, partners were invited to a series of Mediated Seminars, seeking to identify valuable trends relating to the future of the media industry in general, and to smart spaces in a particular. The participants reviewed and discussed all the recent publications available via the EIT ICT Labs Web site (www.eitictlabs.eu/publications), as well as a wide range of publicly available reports and white papers. As a result of this process, the idea was put forward to produce four films that would trigger reflection within the research community about the technical development relating to "smart spaces". This represents a new and experimental form of outreach and dissemination for the activity.

The workshop was successfully concluded, with preliminary drafts for scripts, intended for the creation of four short films, handed over to four different film producers by responsible activity researchers in four different cities (Delft, Helsinki, Luleå, and Stockholm). Tentative versions of three films were screened according to plan at the Espoo SSP Results Day event in December, from which valuable feedback was received, allowing for the first three films to be slightly revised and completed at the end of December. In parallel, the fourth film was realised in two parts and completed at the end of December: Analogue Friday 1 and 2.

National Category
Communication Systems Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-165826 (URN)
Projects
EIT ICT Labs SSP 2014 Mediating Presence: SmartCollaborationSpaces; A1404
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Note

QC 20150511

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2015-05-11Bibliographically approved
Boman, M. & Gullström, C. (2015). Mediated Futures: Technical Foresight report. European Institute of Innovation and Technology, EIT ICT Labs. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediated Futures: Technical Foresight report. European Institute of Innovation and Technology, EIT ICT Labs
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report outlines trends, challenges, and opportunities relating to the future of

Smart Spaces and ICT-mediated human communication, as observed from within

one of the EIT ICT Labs focus areas: Mediating Presence, during 2012-2013. The

study should be seen as an initial and open-ended exploration that seeks to

contribute a productive point of departure for more ambitious work, which will be

undertaken across the Smart Spaces Action Line and using the Innovation Radar

platform in future years. In particular, the business potential of mediating presence is

the focus of a forthcoming 2014 Foresight Technical Report.

As a foresight, Mediated Futures identifies and exposes future themes with high

innovation potential relating to presence technologies, using a time frame roughly six

months to five years ahead. Its purpose is to create a common outlook on the future

of ICT and to establish a shared vocabulary and fruitful methodologies for future

strategy thinking across the EIT ICT Labs nodes and partner organisations.

A series of workshops and other collaborative activities have been organised within

the Mediating Presence activity over the last 15 months. The pivotal output is a

series of one-pagers, short fictional texts, three of which can be encountered on the

following pages. Tentative and possibly provocative, these are slogan-based

descriptions of future scenarios that serve to trigger new perspectives. A total of six

clusters of topics were covered by one-pagers:

 Data doubles

 New magic

 Luddites

 Socialites

 Future of WorkA working future

 Spaces and things

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2015
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-165794 (URN)
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Note

QC 20150430

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2015-04-30Bibliographically approved
Heger, T. & Boman, M. (2015). Networked foresight: The case of EIT ICT Labs. Technological forecasting & social change, 101, 147-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Networked foresight: The case of EIT ICT Labs
2015 (English)In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 101, p. 147-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this article is to explore the value of networked foresight: foresight conducted in innovation networks for the benefit of the network and its partners with active contributions from the partners. Strategic management, specifically the dynamic capabilities approach and vast literature on corporate and strategic foresight argue that deficiencies like one-dimensionality, narrow-sightedness and myopia of closed corporate processes are remedied by incorporating external sources. A broad knowledge base promises to especially benefit foresight in multiple ways. Thus, created an analytical framework that integrates the dynamic capabilities approach with existing results on potential value contributions of foresight, enriched with existing findings in networked foresight and organizational design in the light increasing importance of inter-organizational networks. We conducted a series of interviews and a survey among foresight practitioners in a network to explore the perceived value proposition of networked foresight for the network partners and the network itself. The analysis is based on data drawn from the EIT ICT Labs network of large industry corporations, small-and-medium sized companies, and academic and research institutes. Our study shows that network partners use the results primarily for sensing activities, i.e. data collection and to a lesser extend activity initiation. More sensitive and fundamental organizational aspects such as strategy and decision-making or path-dependency are less affected. Especially SMEs may benefit substantially from network approaches to foresight whereas MNEs are more confident in their existing corporate foresight processes and results. The value for the network itself is substantial and goes beyond value creation potential for companies as discussed in literature. The development of a shared vision—relatable to organizational learning and reconfiguration capabilities—was identified as particularly valuable for the network.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Corporate foresight, Networked foresight, Innovation networks, Collaboration for innovation, Open innovation, Dynamic capabilities
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-159148 (URN)10.1016/j.techfore.2014.02.002 (DOI)000367108500012 ()2-s2.0-84949099852 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160121

Available from: 2015-01-22 Created: 2015-01-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Boman, M. & Sanches, P. (2015). Sensemaking in Intelligent Data Analytics. Künstliche Intelligenz
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensemaking in Intelligent Data Analytics
2015 (English)In: Künstliche Intelligenz, ISSN 0933-1875, E-ISSN 1610-1987Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

A systemic model for making sense of health data is presented, in which networked foresight complements intelligent data analytics. Data here serves the goal of a future systems medicine approach by explaining the past and the current, while foresight can serve by explaining the future. Anecdotal evidence from a case study is presented, in which the complex decisions faced by the traditional stakeholder of results—the policymaker—are replaced by the often mundane problems faced by an individual trying to make sense of sensor input and output when self-tracking wellness. The conclusion is that the employment of our systemic model for successful sensemaking integrates not only data with networked foresight, but also unpacks such problems and the user practices associated with their solutions.

Keywords
Artificial intelligence Massive data Health data Intelligent data analytics Syndromic surveillance Sensemaking
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158906 (URN)10.1007/s13218-015-0349-0 (DOI)
Note

QP 2015

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7949-1815

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