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Pettersson, TorbjörnORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5444-7276
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Publications (10 of 132) Show all publications
Svagan, A. J., Vilaplana, F., Pettersson, T., Anusuyadevi, P. R., Henriksson, G. & Hedenqvist, M. S. (2024). Centrifuge fractionation during purification of cellulose nanocrystals after acid hydrolysis and consequences on their chiral self-assembly. Carbohydrate Polymers, 328, Article ID 121723.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Centrifuge fractionation during purification of cellulose nanocrystals after acid hydrolysis and consequences on their chiral self-assembly
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2024 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 328, article id 121723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The inherent colloidal dispersity (due to length, aspect ratio, surface charge heterogeneity) of CNCs, when produced using the typical traditional sulfuric acid hydrolysis route, presents a great challenge when interpreting colloidal properties and linking the CNC film nanostructure to the helicoidal self-assembly mechanism during drying. Indeed, further improvement of this CNC preparation route is required to yield films with better control over the CNC pitch and optical properties. Here we present a modified CNC-preparation protocol, by fractionating and harvesting CNCs with different average surface charges, rod lengths, aspect ratios, already during the centrifugation steps after hydrolysis. This enables faster CNC fractionation, because it is performed in a high ionic strength aqueous medium. By comparing dry films from the three CNC fractions, discrepancies in the CNC self-assembly and structural colors were clearly observed. Conclusively, we demonstrate a fast protocol to harvest different populations of CNCs, that enable tailored refinement of structural colors in CNC films.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Cellulose nanocrystals, Fractionation, Structural colors, Sulfuric acid hydrolysis
National Category
Polymer Technologies Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-342832 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2023.121723 (DOI)2-s2.0-85182892792 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240201

Available from: 2024-01-31 Created: 2024-01-31 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Li, H., Asta, N., Wang, Z., Pettersson, T. & Wågberg, L. (2024). Reevaluation of the adhesion between cellulose materials using macro spherical beads and flat model surfaces. Carbohydrate Polymers, 332, 121894-121894, Article ID 121894.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reevaluation of the adhesion between cellulose materials using macro spherical beads and flat model surfaces
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2024 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 332, p. 121894-121894, article id 121894Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactions between dry cellulose were studied using model systems, cellulose beads, and cellulose films, usingcustom-built contact adhesion testing equipment. Depending on the configuration of the substrates in contact,Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film, cellulose films spin-coated either on PDMS or glass, the interaction showsthree distinct processes. Firstly, molecular interlocking is formed between cellulose and cellulose when there is asoft PDMS thin film backing the cellulose film. Secondly, without backing, no initial attraction force between thesurfaces is observed. Thirdly, a significant force increase, ΔF, is observed during the retraction process for cel­lulose on glass, and there is a maximum in ΔF when the retraction rate is increased. This is due to the kinetics of acontacting process occurring in the interaction zone between the surfaces caused by an interdigitation of a finefibrillar structure at the nano-scale, whereas, for the spin-coated cellulose surfaces on the PDMS backing, there isa more direct adhesive failure. The results have generated understanding of the interaction between cellulose-rich materials, which helps design new, advanced cellulose-based materials. The results also show thecomplexity of the interaction between these surfaces and that earlier mechanisms, based on macroscopic materialtesting, are simply not adequate for molecular tailoring.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2024
Keywords
Interaction, Cellulose thin film, Cellulose bead, Contact adhesion testing
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-344920 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2024.121894 (DOI)001183175200001 ()38431407 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184997085 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20240408

Available from: 2024-04-03 Created: 2024-04-03 Last updated: 2024-04-08
Abbasi Aval, N., Lahchaichi, E., Tudoran, O., Fayazbakhsh, F., Heuchel, R., Löhr, M., . . . Russom, A. (2023). Assessing the Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Cellulose Nanofibrils and Polyelectrolytes in Pancreatic Tumor Spheroid Formation. Biomedicines, 11(11)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Cellulose Nanofibrils and Polyelectrolytes in Pancreatic Tumor Spheroid Formation
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2023 (English)In: Biomedicines, E-ISSN 2227-9059, Vol. 11, no 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids are regarded as promising models for utilization as preclinical assessments of chemo-sensitivity. However, the creation of these tumor spheroids presents challenges, given that not all tumor cell lines are able to form consistent and regular spheroids. In this context, we have developed a novel layer-by-layer coating of cellulose nanofibril–polyelectrolyte bilayers for the generation of spheroids. This technique builds bilayers of cellulose nanofibrils and polyelectrolytes and is used here to coat two distinct 96-well plate types: nontreated/non-sterilized and Nunclon Delta. In this work, we optimized the protocol aimed at generating and characterizing spheroids on difficult-to-grow pancreatic tumor cell lines. Here, diverse parameters were explored, encompassing the bilayer count (five and ten) and multiple cell-seeding concentrations (10, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 cells per well), using four pancreatic tumor cell lines—KPCT, PANC-1, MiaPaCa-2, and CFPAC-I. The evaluation includes the quantification (number of spheroids, size, and morphology) and proliferation of the produced spheroids, as well as an assessment of their viability. Notably, our findings reveal a significant influence from both the number of bilayers and the plate type used on the successful formation of spheroids. The novel and simple layer-by-layer-based coating method has the potential to offer the large-scale production of spheroids across a spectrum of tumor cell lines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2023
Keywords
pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, three-dimensional tumor model, layer-by-layer, cellulose nanofibrils
National Category
Biomaterials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-339943 (URN)10.3390/biomedicines11113061 (DOI)001107899000001 ()2-s2.0-85178372456 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20231215

Available from: 2023-11-22 Created: 2023-11-22 Last updated: 2023-12-29Bibliographically approved
Abbasi Aval, N., Lahchaichi, E., Fayazbakhsh, F., Tudoran, O., Russom, A. & Pettersson, T. (2023). Evaluating the Impact of Positively Charged Polyelectrolyte Molecular Weightand Bilayer Number on Tumor Spheroid Formation in the Interaction with Negatively Charged Cellulose Nanofibrils in layer by layer assembly.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the Impact of Positively Charged Polyelectrolyte Molecular Weightand Bilayer Number on Tumor Spheroid Formation in the Interaction with Negatively Charged Cellulose Nanofibrils in layer by layer assembly
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2023 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Biomaterials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-339926 (URN)
Note

QC 20231127

Available from: 2023-11-22 Created: 2023-11-22 Last updated: 2023-11-29Bibliographically approved
Marcioni, M., Zhao, M., Maddalena, L., Pettersson, T., Avolio, R., Castaldo, R., . . . Carosio, F. (2023). Layer-by-Layer-Coated Cellulose Fibers Enable the Production of Porous, Flame-Retardant, and Lightweight Materials. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 15(30), 36811-36821
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Layer-by-Layer-Coated Cellulose Fibers Enable the Production of Porous, Flame-Retardant, and Lightweight Materials
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2023 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 15, no 30, p. 36811-36821Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New sustainable materialsproduced by green processing routes arerequired in order to meet the concepts of circular economy. The replacementof insulating materials comprising flammable synthetic polymers bybio-based materials represents a potential opportunity to achievethis task. In this paper, low-density and flame-retardant (FR) porousfiber networks are prepared by assembling Layer-by-Layer (LbL)-functionalizedcellulose fibers by means of freeze-drying. The LbL coating, encompassingchitosan and sodium hexametaphosphate, enables the formation of aself-sustained porous structure by enhancing fiber-fiber interactionsduring the freeze-drying process. Fiber networks prepared from 3 Bi-Layer(BL)-coated fibers contain 80% wt of cellulose and can easily self-extinguishthe flame during flammability tests in vertical configuration whiledisplaying extremely low combustion rates in forced combustion tests.Smoke release is 1 order of magnitude lower than that of commerciallyavailable polyurethane foams. Such high FR efficiency is ascribedto the homogeneity of the deposited assembly, which produces a protectiveexoskeleton at the air/cellulose interface. The results reported inthis paper represent an excellent opportunity for the developmentof fire-safe materials, encompassing natural components where sustainabilityand performance are maximized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2023
Keywords
cellulose, porous materials, layer-by-layer, flame-retardancy, lightweight materials
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-333805 (URN)10.1021/acsami.3c06652 (DOI)001032189600001 ()37467121 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166442328 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230810

Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2023-08-10Bibliographically approved
Lopez-Guajardo, A., Zafar, A., Al Hennawi, K., Rossi, V., Alrwaili, A., Medcalf, J. D., . . . Gad, A. K. B. (2023). Regulation of cellular contractile force, shape and migration of fibroblasts by oncogenes and Histone deacetylase 6. Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, 10, Article ID 1197814.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulation of cellular contractile force, shape and migration of fibroblasts by oncogenes and Histone deacetylase 6
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, E-ISSN 2296-889X, Vol. 10, article id 1197814Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The capacity of cells to adhere to, exert forces upon and migrate through their surrounding environment governs tissue regeneration and cancer metastasis. The role of the physical contractile forces that cells exert in this process, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We, therefore, aimed to clarify if the extracellular forces that cells exert on their environment and/or the intracellular forces that deform the cell nucleus, and the link between these forces, are defective in transformed and invasive fibroblasts, and to indicate the underlying molecular mechanism of control. Confocal, Epifluorescence and Traction force microscopy, followed by computational analysis, showed an increased maximum contractile force that cells apply on their environment and a decreased intracellular force on the cell nucleus in the invasive fibroblasts, as compared to normal control cells. Loss of HDAC6 activity by tubacin-treatment and siRNA-mediated HDAC6 knockdown also reversed the reduced size and more circular shape and defective migration of the transformed and invasive cells to normal. However, only tubacin-mediated, and not siRNA knockdown reversed the increased force of the invasive cells on their surrounding environment to normal, with no effects on nuclear forces. We observed that the forces on the environment and the nucleus were weakly positively correlated, with the exception of HDAC6 siRNA-treated cells, in which the correlation was weakly negative. The transformed and invasive fibroblasts showed an increased number and smaller cell-matrix adhesions than control, and neither tubacin-treatment, nor HDAC6 knockdown reversed this phenotype to normal, but instead increased it further. This highlights the possibility that the control of contractile force requires separate functions of HDAC6, than the control of cell adhesions, spreading and shape. These data are consistent with the possibility that defective force-transduction from the extracellular environment to the nucleus contributes to metastasis, via a mechanism that depends upon HDAC6. To our knowledge, our findings present the first correlation between the cellular forces that deforms the surrounding environment and the nucleus in fibroblasts, and it expands our understanding of how cells generate contractile forces that contribute to cell invasion and metastasis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media SA, 2023
Keywords
Traction force microscopy, cellular contractile forces, intracellular forces on nucleus, fibroblasts, cell adhesion, Histone deacetylase 6, oncogenes, metastasis
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-334755 (URN)10.3389/fmolb.2023.1197814 (DOI)001044471300001 ()37564130 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85167455683 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230824

Available from: 2023-08-24 Created: 2023-08-24 Last updated: 2023-08-24Bibliographically approved
Asta, N., Reid, M. S., Pettersson, T. & Wågberg, L. (2023). The Use of Model Cellulose Materials for Studying Molecular Interactions at Cellulose Interfaces. ACS Macro Letters, 12(11), 1530-1535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Use of Model Cellulose Materials for Studying Molecular Interactions at Cellulose Interfaces
2023 (English)In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 1530-1535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite extensive research on biobased and fiber-basedmaterials, fundamental questions regarding the molecular processesgoverning fiber−fiber interactions remain unanswered. In this study, weintroduce a method to examine and clarify molecular interactions withinfiber−fiber joints using precisely characterized model materials, i.e.,regenerated cellulose gel beads with nanometer-smooth surfaces. Byphysically modifying these materials and drying them together to createmodel joints, we can investigate the mechanisms responsible for joiningcellulose surfaces and how this affects adhesion in both dry and wet statesthrough precise separation measurements. The findings reveal a subtlebalance in the joint formation, influencing the development ofnanometer-sized structures at the contact zone and likely inducingbuilt-in stresses in the interphase. This research illustrates how model materials can be tailored to control interactions betweencellulose-rich surfaces, laying the groundwork for future high-resolution studies aimed at creating stiff, ductile, and/or tough jointsbetween cellulose surfaces and to allow for the design of high-performance biobased materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2023
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-344919 (URN)10.1021/acsmacrolett.3c00578 (DOI)001096724800001 ()37910654 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178324088 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationStora Enso
Note

QC 20240404

Available from: 2024-04-03 Created: 2024-04-03 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
Zhao, M., Robertsén, L., Wågberg, L. & Pettersson, T. (2022). Adsorption of paper strength additives to hardwood fibres with different surface charges and their effect on paper strength. Cellulose, 29(4), 2617-2632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adsorption of paper strength additives to hardwood fibres with different surface charges and their effect on paper strength
2022 (English)In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 2617-2632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Light-weight paper products that contain less fibres, but with a maintained bulk and improved strength properties, are highly desirable due to the low cost of raw materials and improved logistics of packaged goods. In this respect, the adsorption capacity of dry strength additives onto fibres, which is affected by the surface charge of said fibres, is very important for the development of these mechanically robust paper products. The influence of the surface charge on the adsorption of strength additives was investigated for, dissolving grade fibres, kraft fibres and kraft fibres modified with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) with different surface charge densities, but the same fibre dimensions. The strength additives investigated were cationic starch (CS), anionic polyacrylamide (APAM) and polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs), containing CS and APAM. A linear relationship was found between the surface charge of the fibres and the saturated adsorbed amount of CS. However, when either APAM or PECs adsorbed as secondary layers onto the CS, no correlation between cellulose charge and the saturation adsorption could be observed. The adsorption of APAM was dramatically affected by the pre-adsorbed amount of CS, whereas PECs were less influenced. Moreover, the additives improved the tensile strength (60%) and strain at break (> 100%) of handsheets formed with the kraft fibres and adsorbed APAM. It was also found that CS/APAM increased the sheet density while CS/PECs lowered it. In conclusion, the gained fundamental understanding of these adsorption of additives is of significant importance to facilitate the industrial development of sustainable low-cost high-end packaging products. Graphical abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
Keywords
Anionic polyacrylamide, Birch fibres, Cationic starch, Paper dry strength, Polyelectrolytes complexes, Surface charge, Additives, Cellulose, Costs, Fibers, Paper, Polyelectrolytes, Starch, Tensile strength, Birch fiber, Cationic starches, Dry strengths, Kraft fibers, Low-costs, Paper strengths, Polyelectrolyte complexes, Strength additives, Adsorption
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-320552 (URN)10.1007/s10570-022-04447-3 (DOI)000752239900001 ()2-s2.0-85124309994 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20221027

Available from: 2022-10-27 Created: 2022-10-27 Last updated: 2022-12-20Bibliographically approved
Zhao, M., Robertsén, L., Wågberg, L. & Pettersson, T. (2022). Effect of saturation adsorption of paper strength additives on the performance of paper. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 37(4), 624-635
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of saturation adsorption of paper strength additives on the performance of paper
2022 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 624-635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of paper dry strength additives is oneof the methods for producing packaging boards with alower grammage while maintaining mechanical properties.In the present work, papers were formed using dissolvinggrade kraft fibres, kraft fibres and carboxymethylatedcellulose (CMC) modified kraft fibres (C-kraft fibres),with either cationic starch (CS), anionic polyacrylamide(APAM) or anionic polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs). Fibresand sheets were characterized to evaluate how the saturationadsorption of the different strength additives influencesthe properties of the treated fibres and the finalhandsheets. The tensile index of papers made from C-kraftfibres was the highest due to the highest adsorption capacityof strength additives. Moreover, the strength additivesincreased the tensile index by 33–84 %, while z-directional tensile strength was increased dramatically by 46–139 %.Bending stiffness was improved by 2.6–25 %, and the combination of CS and APAM or PECs resulted in a significantimprovement in bending stiffness compared to the addition of CS alone. Importantly, the strength improvement did not sacrifice the density significantly. In summary, theknowledge gained from the current study expands the understanding of strength additives and their relationship with fibres of different surface charge and the overall paper properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2022
Keywords
bending stiffness; birch fibres; dry strength additives; dry strength of paper; surface charge.
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Research subject
Fibre and Polymer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-322552 (URN)10.1515/npprj-2022-0080 (DOI)000879890700001 ()2-s2.0-85142334676 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20221227

Available from: 2022-12-19 Created: 2022-12-19 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Jiang, K., Wen, X., Pettersson, T. & Crouzier, T. (2022). Engineering Surfaces with Immune Modulating Properties of Mucin Hydrogels. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 14(35), 39727-39735
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engineering Surfaces with Immune Modulating Properties of Mucin Hydrogels
2022 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 14, no 35, p. 39727-39735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hydrogels of cross-linked mucin glycoproteins (Muc-gel) have shown strong immune-modulating properties toward macrophages in vitro, which are translated in vivo by the dampening of the foreign body response to implantation in mice. Beyond mucin hydrogels, other biomaterials such as sensors, electrodes, and other long-term implants would also benefit from such immune-modulating properties. In this work, we aimed to transfer the bioactivity observed for three-dimensional Muc-gels to the surface of two model materials by immobilizing mucin into thin films (Muc-film) using covalent layer-by-layer assembly. We tested how the surface immobilization of mucins affects macrophage responses compared to Muc-gels. We showed that Muc-films on soft polyacrylamide gels mimic Muc-gel in their modulation of macrophage responses with activated gene expression of inflammatory cytokines on day 1 and then dampening them on day 3. Also, the markers of polarized macrophages, M1 and M2, were expressed at the same level for macrophages on Muc-film-coated soft polyacrylamide gels and Muc-gel. In contrast, Muc-film-coated hard polystyrene led to a different macrophage response compared to Muc-gel, having no activated expression of inflammatory cytokines and a different M1 marker expression. This suggested that the substrate mechanical properties and mucin molecular configuration determined by substrate-mucin interactions affect mucin immune-modulating properties. We conclude that mucin immune-modulating properties can be transferred to materials by mucin surface immobilization but will be dependent on the substrate chemical and mechanical properties. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2022
Keywords
biomaterials, immune-modulating, macrophage polarization, mucin coating, Crosslinking, Gels, Hydrogels, Macrophages, Thin films, Engineering surfaces, In-vitro, Inflammatory cytokines, Polyacrylamide gels, Property, Surface immobilization, Thin-films, Gene expression, biological marker, biomaterial, cytokine, glycoprotein, mucin, mucin 1, animal, chemistry, hydrogel, macrophage, metabolism, mouse, Animals, Biocompatible Materials, Biomarkers, Cytokines, Glycoproteins, Mice, Mucin-1, Mucins
National Category
Biomaterials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-327045 (URN)10.1021/acsami.1c19250 (DOI)000848450400001 ()36000701 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85137391655 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230523

Available from: 2023-05-23 Created: 2023-05-23 Last updated: 2023-05-23Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5444-7276

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