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Hetemi, E., Mere, J. O., Nuur, C. & Engwall, M. (2017). Exploring mechanisms underlying lock-in in large infrastructure projects: A management perspective. In: CENTERIS 2017 - International Conference on ENTERprise Information Systems / ProjMAN 2017 - International Conference on Project MANagement / HCist 2017 - International Conference on Health and Social Care Information Systems and Technologies, CENTERIS/ProjMAN/HCist 2017: . Paper presented at International Conference on ENTERprise Information Systems, CENTERIS 2017, International Conference on Project MANagement, ProjMAN 2017 and International Conference on Health and Social Care Information Systems and Technologies, HCist 2017,Barcelona, Spain 8 November 2017 through 10 November 2017 (pp. 681-691). Elsevier, 121.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring mechanisms underlying lock-in in large infrastructure projects: A management perspective
2017 (English)In: CENTERIS 2017 - International Conference on ENTERprise Information Systems / ProjMAN 2017 - International Conference on Project MANagement / HCist 2017 - International Conference on Health and Social Care Information Systems and Technologies, CENTERIS/ProjMAN/HCist 2017, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 121, 681-691 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research in large scale infrastructure projects have argued that the overall project performance is subject to lock-in, yet this is little understood empirically and more research is needed. Recently studies reported that lock-in can occur both at the decision-making level and at the project execution level respectively. The underlying patterns influencing project scope transformation, due to evolving expectations and/or stakeholder's perspective and the occurrence of lock-in influence in project performance. This paper explores the relationship between project scope and lock-in within large infrastructure projects in the context of cost over-run. Based on empirical data from 20 High Speed Rail (HSR) projects in Spain with multinational sets of actors, and anchored in the Management of Project (MoP) paradigm, the paper shows that a holistic perspective is essential for successful outcome. Methodologically, the paper uses data mining and a case study approach to explore mechanisms that underlie lock-in in relation with scope demarcation - tracked through contract change. It suggests that an investigation of lock-in in relationship to scope demarcation and through the lens of path dependence contributes to the understanding of cost over-run emergence. Preliminary findings highlight contract type and its content to have a great influence in cost over-run.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Series
Procedia Computer Science, ISSN 1877-0509 ; 121
Keyword
front-end decision making, large scale projects, Lock-in, management of project paradigm, path dependence, project performance, project scope
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-221210 (URN)10.1016/j.procs.2017.11.089 (DOI)2-s2.0-85040257933 (Scopus ID)
Conference
International Conference on ENTERprise Information Systems, CENTERIS 2017, International Conference on Project MANagement, ProjMAN 2017 and International Conference on Health and Social Care Information Systems and Technologies, HCist 2017,Barcelona, Spain 8 November 2017 through 10 November 2017
Note

QC 20180116

Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Nuur, C. (2017). Exporting higher education from old industrialized nations to developing countries; who benefits?. In: Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC (Ed.), INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE. Paper presented at 11th International Conference on Technology, Education and Development (INTED), MAR 06-08, 2017, Valencia, SPAIN (pp. 2080-2080). IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exporting higher education from old industrialized nations to developing countries; who benefits?
2017 (English)In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2017, 2080-2080 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT, 2017
Series
INTED Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1079
Keyword
Higher education, internationalization, exporting, benefits
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-217959 (URN)000413668602024 ()978-84-617-8491-2 (ISBN)
Conference
11th International Conference on Technology, Education and Development (INTED), MAR 06-08, 2017, Valencia, SPAIN
Note

QC 20171121

Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Sabri, Y., Micheli, G. J. .. & Nuur, C. (2017). How Do Different Supply Chain Configuration Settings Impact on Performance Trade-Offs?. International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, 26(1), 34-56.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Do Different Supply Chain Configuration Settings Impact on Performance Trade-Offs?
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, ISSN 1742-7967, E-ISSN 1742-7975, Vol. 26, no 1, 34-56 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The notion of ‘fit’ in the supply chain management literature (SCM) has evolved following the adoption of the contingency approach in an endeavour to achieve greater organisational effectiveness. In this paper, we investigate the possible approaches to achieving a state of fit between supply chain configuration settings and performance indicators, while taking into account the contextual factors related to different industry sectors and geographical dispersion levels. This study addresses the pressing issue of the performance trade-offs faced by companies to achieve a higher service level and customer satisfaction (effectiveness) on the one hand, while being cost-efficient on the other hand (efficiency).

The paper contributes to the SCM literature and practice through synthesising a conceptual framework that scrutinises the relationships between six individual configuration settings and nine effectiveness/efficiency indicators. The study’s findings explain the motivations behind different configuration decisions, which help in obtaining the most appropriate fit between supply chain configuration and performance. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2017
Keyword
supply chain configuration, supply chain design, supply chain fit, contingency approach, efficiency, effectiveness, performance management, performance trade-offs
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Industrial Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-176103 (URN)10.1504/IJLSM.2017.10000702 (DOI)2-s2.0-85002959263 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Funded by the European Commission, Erasmus Mundus Action 1 - EMJD Programme European Doctorate in Industrial Management (EDIM)
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Note

QC 20151102. QC 20160112

Available from: 2015-11-01 Created: 2015-11-01 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Gustavsson, L., Nuur, C. & Söderlind, J. (2016). An impact analysis of regional industry–university interactions:the case of industrial PhD schools. Industry and Higher Education, 30(1), 41-51.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An impact analysis of regional industry–university interactions:the case of industrial PhD schools
2016 (English)In: Industry and Higher Education, ISSN 0950-4222, Vol. 30, no 1, 41-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The authors discuss Triple Helix collaborations in the context of regional competitiveness. Through an exploratory case study, they identify and analyse the impact of the establishment of industrial PhD schools for participating industry and universities. The study was conducted in Sweden in 2014 and focuses on three industry–university initiatives involving a total of 57 doctoral students, 9 universities and 39 companies. The results indicate that PhD schools based on the dynamics of the Triple Helix can be of great benefit for both industry and regional universities. In addition, the paper identifies critical success factors for industry–university collaborations involving joint PhD education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-178116 (URN)10.5367/ihe.2016.0291 (DOI)2-s2.0-85033778032 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2013.0194
Note

QC 20171128

Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Karakaya, E., Nuur, C. & Hidalgo, A. (2016). Business model challenge: Lessons from a local solar company. Renewable energy, 85, 1026-1035.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Business model challenge: Lessons from a local solar company
2016 (English)In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 85, 1026-1035 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Solar photovoltaic systems are considered vital renewable energy sources for mitigating climate change and reducing dependency on fossil fuels. However, in some countries, the diffusion rate of photovoltaic systems is decreasing. A case in point is Germany, the country with the highest installed capacity of photovoltaic systems. Given the new conditions in the German market, the diffusion rate continuously declined in both 2012 and 2013. Whether the diffusion rate will again take off is not known. While the recent literature has pointed out that local solar companies have a vital driving role in diffusion, not many studies have yet discussed the business models and challenges such local companies may have. Through an extensive case study, this paper explores the business model of a local solar company in a town of 43,000 habitants in Southern Germany. The case of this company tells about an important business model challenge. Overcoming such challenges may not only let the company survive but also drive the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in the region. The results include implications for both industrial actors and policymakers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keyword
Diffusion, Innovation, Solar photovoltaics, Business model, Renewable energy, Product life cycle
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-171866 (URN)10.1016/j.renene.2015.07.069 (DOI)000363344800101 ()2-s2.0-84938351504 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150810

Available from: 2015-08-08 Created: 2015-08-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Levihn, F. & Nuur, C. (2016). Co-benefits of primary energy conservation, reduced emissions and costs through biomass and waste incineration chp in district heating. International Journal of Energy Production and Management, 1(1), 87-98.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-benefits of primary energy conservation, reduced emissions and costs through biomass and waste incineration chp in district heating
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Energy Production and Management, ISSN 2056-3272, E-ISSN 2056-3280, Vol. 1, no 1, 87-98 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy utility companies face trade-offs in navigating through today’s environmental challenges. On the one hand, they face intense political, social and environmental pressures to move toward adopting energy systems that incorporate the use of renewable energy resources. By making this transition, they would contribute to carbon reduction and mitigate climate change. On the other hand, they need to coordinate their resources and become efficient when investing in new plants or upgrading existing production systems. This paper seeks to address the gains that utility companies can make when replacing older fossil-fuel-based plants with efficient combined heat and power (CHP) plants. We discuss the system effects from the changes in production of other units when new plants are constructed. Using one of the largest energy utility companies in Sweden, Fortum, as empirical point of departure, we analyzed the company’s transition from using coal and hydrocarbons to an increased use of renewables and waste incineration CHP. Our analysis was based on comprehensive production data on CO2, SOx and NOx emissions. Our findings suggest that primary energy consumption drops when older, less efficient fossil plants are substituted for new efficient CHP plants; this drop includes the effect on remaining production. The benefits in terms of primary energy savings might even be greater than what is achieved in meeting the goal of climate change abatement through reduced CO2 emissions; NOx and SOx emissions are decreased with new biomass CHPs. Waste incineration CHP increases NOx and SOx emissions, when there is less fossil fuel to replace after the use of biomass is extended. In both cases, economic efficiency increase as costs are reduced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WIT Press, 2016
Keyword
climate change abatement, district heating, environmental impact, primary energy conservation
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-169647 (URN)10.2495/EQ-V1-N1-87-98 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 35894-1
Note

QC 20151208

Available from: 2015-06-19 Created: 2015-06-19 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Mertanen, O., Gustavsson, L., Nuur, C. & Laestadius, S. (2016). Remnants from the past or industries for the future? The case of Swedish iron ore mining. In: 18th EBES conference: . Paper presented at 18th EBES conference. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remnants from the past or industries for the future? The case of Swedish iron ore mining
2016 (English)In: 18th EBES conference, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180280 (URN)
Conference
18th EBES conference
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2013.0194
Note

QC 20160120

Available from: 2016-01-09 Created: 2016-01-09 Last updated: 2016-01-20Bibliographically approved
Sabri, Y., Micheli, G. J. .. & Nuur, C. (2015). Exploring supply chain configuration in the context of innovation practices: cases from Italy and Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at 22nd EurOMA Conference. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring supply chain configuration in the context of innovation practices: cases from Italy and Sweden
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Extant literature often links innovation practices with supply chain (SC) research in introducing new product. However, the relation between SC configuration settings and innovation implementation is still not widely researched. This paper analyses how innovation implementation affects the decisions behind SC configuration. Moreover, we look into how this relation is manifested with respect to performance. An explorative investigation is carried out in two companies, implementing innovation, which have global and local supply chain configuration with different product characteristics and processes. The paper draws conclusions on the relations between innovation implementation, supply chain configuration and performance improvements (or failures).

Keyword
Supply Chain Configuration, Innovation practices, Performance
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-176431 (URN)
Conference
22nd EurOMA Conference
Note

QC 20160127

Available from: 2015-11-03 Created: 2015-11-03 Last updated: 2016-01-27Bibliographically approved
Karakaya, E., Hidalgo, A. & Nuur, C. (2015). Motivators for adoption of photovoltaic systems at grid parity: A case study from Southern Germany. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 43, 1090-1098.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivators for adoption of photovoltaic systems at grid parity: A case study from Southern Germany
2015 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 43, 1090-1098 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In some countries, photovoltaic (PV) technology is at a stage of development at which it can compete with conventional electricity sources in terms of electricity generation costs, i.e., grid parity. A case in point is Germany, where the PV market has reached a mature stage, the policy support has scaled down and the diffusion rate of PV systems has declined. This development raises a fundamental question: what are the motives to adopt PV systems at grid parity? The point of departure for the relevant literature has been on the impact of policy support, adopters and, recently, local solar companies. However, less attention has been paid to the motivators for adoption at grid parity. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the diffusion of PV systems, explaining the impact of policy measures, adopters and system suppliers. Anchored in an extensive and exploratory case study in Germany, we provide a context-specific explanation to the motivations to adopt PV systems at grid parity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keyword
Deployment, Grid parity, Innovation, Micro generation, Policy, Solar
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-157789 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2014.11.077 (DOI)000348880600085 ()2-s2.0-84919667492 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150310

Available from: 2014-12-16 Created: 2014-12-16 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Levihn, F. & Nuur, C. (2014). Biomass and waste incineration CHP: co-benefits of primary energy savings, reduced emissions and costs. Wit Transactions on Ecology and The Environment, 190, 127-138.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomass and waste incineration CHP: co-benefits of primary energy savings, reduced emissions and costs
2014 (English)In: Wit Transactions on Ecology and The Environment, ISSN 1746-448X, E-ISSN 1743-3541, Vol. 190, 127-138 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy utility companies face trade-offs in navigating through today’s environmental challenges. On the one hand they face intense political, social and environmental pressures to move towards adopting energy systems that incorporate the use of renewable energy resources. By making this transition they would contribute to carbon reduction and mitigate climate change. On the other hand, they need to coordinate their resources and become efficient when investing in new plants or upgrading existing production systems. This paper seeks to address the gains that utility companies can make when replacing older fossil fuel base- plants with efficient combined heat and power (CHP) plants. We discuss the system effects from the changes in production of other units when new plants are constructed. Using one of the largest energy utility companies in Sweden, Fortum, as empirical point of departure, we analyzed the company’s transition from using coal and hydrocarbons to an increased use of renewables and waste incineration CHP. Our analysis was based on comprehensive production data on CO2, SOx and NOx emissions. Our findings suggest that primary energy consumption drops when older, less efficient fossil plants are substituted for new efficient CHP plants; this drop includes the effect on remaining production. The benefits in terms of primary energy savings might even be greater than what is achieved in meeting the goal of climate change abatement through reduced CO2 emissions; NOx and SOx emissions are decreased with new biomass CHPs. Waste incineration CHP increase NOx and SOx emissions, when there is less fossil fuel to replace after the use of biomass is extended. In both cases, economic efficiency increase as costs are reduced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WIT Press, 2014
National Category
Energy Engineering Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-142656 (URN)10.2495/EQ140141 (DOI)2-s2.0-84897854238 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 35894-1
Note

QC 20140317

Available from: 2014-03-11 Created: 2014-03-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5912-441X

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