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Oakes, B. D., Mattsson, L.-G., Näsman, P. & Glazunov, A. A. (2018). A Systems-Based Risk Assessment Framework for Intentional Electromagnetic Interference (IEMI) on Critical Infrastructures. Risk Analysis, 38(6), 1279-1305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Systems-Based Risk Assessment Framework for Intentional Electromagnetic Interference (IEMI) on Critical Infrastructures
2018 (English)In: Risk Analysis, ISSN 0272-4332, E-ISSN 1539-6924, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1279-1305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Modern infrastructures are becoming increasingly dependent on electronic systems, leaving them more vulnerable to electrical surges or electromagnetic interference. Electromagnetic disturbances appear in nature, e.g., lightning and solar wind; however, they may also be generated by man-made technology to maliciously damage or disturb electronic equipment. This article presents a systematic risk assessment framework for identifying possible, consequential, and plausible intentional electromagnetic interference (IEMI) attacks on an arbitrary distribution network infrastructure. In the absence of available data on IEMI occurrences, we find that a systems-based risk assessment is more useful than a probabilistic approach. We therefore modify the often applied definition of risk, i.e., a set of triplets containing scenario, probability, and consequence, to a set of quadruplets: scenario, resource requirements, plausibility, and consequence. Probability is replaced by resource requirements and plausibility, where the former is the minimum amount and type of equipment necessary to successfully carry out an attack scenario and the latter is a subjective assessment of the extent of the existence of attackers who possess the motivation, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the scenario. We apply the concept of intrusion areas and classify electromagnetic source technology according to key attributes. Worst-case scenarios are identified for different quantities of attacker resources. The most plausible and consequential of these are deemed the most important scenarios and should provide useful decision support in a countermeasures effort. Finally, an example of the proposed risk assessment framework, based on notional data, is provided on a hypothetical water distribution network.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
Critical infrastructures, intentional electromagnetic interference (IEMI), operational models, risk analysis, water distribution network
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231194 (URN)10.1111/risa.12945 (DOI)000434645900013 ()29314162 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040365367 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies AgencyThe Swedish Post and Telecom Authority (PTS)
Note

QC 20180720

Available from: 2018-07-20 Created: 2018-07-20 Last updated: 2018-07-20Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, B., Wandell, P., Dahlstrom, U., Näsman, P., Lund, L. H. & Edner, M. (2018). Comorbidities, risk factors and outcomes in patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction of more than or equal to 40% in primary care- and hospital care-based outpatient clinics. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 36(2), 207-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidities, risk factors and outcomes in patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction of more than or equal to 40% in primary care- and hospital care-based outpatient clinics
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 207-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study is to describe patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction (EF) of more than or equal to 40%, managed in both Primary- and Hospital based outpatient clinks separately with their prognosis, comorbidities and risk factors. Further to compare the heart failure medication in the two groups. Design: We used the prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry to include 9654 out-patients who had HF and EF >= 40%, 1802 patients were registered in primary care and 7852 in hospital care. Descriptive statistical tests were used to analyze base line characteristics in the two groups and multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess mortality rate in the groups separately. Setting: The prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Setting: The prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Subjects: Patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction (EF) of more than or equal to 40%. Main outcome measures: Comorbidities, risk factors and mortality. Results: Mean-age was 77.5 (primary care) and 70.3 years (hospital care) p < 0.0001, 46.7 vs. 36.3% women respectively (p < 0.0001) and EF >= 50% 26.1 vs. 13.4% (p < 0.0001). Co-morbidities were common in both groups (97.2% vs. 92.3%), the primary care group having more atrial fibrillation, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and COPD. According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis smoking, COPD and diabetes were the most important independent risk factors in the primary care group and valvular disease in the hospital care group. All-cause mortality during mean follow-up of almost 4 years was 315% in primary care and 27.8% in hospital care. One year-mortality rates were 7.8%, and 7.0% respectively. Conclusion: Any co-morbidity was noted in 97% of the HF-patients with an EF of more than or equal to 40% managed at primary care based out-patient clinics and these patients had partly other independent risk factors than those patients managed in hospital care based outpatients clinics. Our results indicate that more attention should be payed to manage COPD in the primary care group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Heart failure, preserved ejection fraction, primary care, risk factors, outcome
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228293 (URN)10.1080/02813432.2018.1459654 (DOI)000431601000013 ()29633886 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045147465 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180521

Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-05-21Bibliographically approved
Lundstrom, E., Isaksson, E., Wester, P., Laska, A.-C. & Näsman, P. (2018). Enhancing Recruitment Using Teleconference and Commitment Contract (ERUTECC): study protocol for a randomised, stepped-wedge cluster trial within the EFFECTS trial. Trials, 19, Article ID 14.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing Recruitment Using Teleconference and Commitment Contract (ERUTECC): study protocol for a randomised, stepped-wedge cluster trial within the EFFECTS trial
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2018 (English)In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 19, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Many randomised controlled trials (RCTs) fail to meet their recruitment goals in time. Trialists are advised to include study recruitment strategies within their trials. EFFECTS is a Swedish, academic-led RCT of fluoxetine for stroke recovery. The trial's primary objective is to investigate whether 20 mg fluoxetine daily compared with placebo for 6 months after an acute stroke improves the patient's functional outcome. The first patient was included on 20 October 2014 and, as of 31 August 2017, EFFECTS has included 810 of planned 1500 individuals. EFFECTS currently has 32 active centres. The primary objective of the ERUTECC (Enhancing Recruitment Using Teleconference and Commitment Contract) study is to investigate whether a structured teleconference re-visit with the study personnel at the centres, accompanied by a commitment contract, can enhance recruitment by 20% at 60 days post intervention, compared with 60 days pre-intervention, in an ongoing RCT. Methods: ERUTECC is a randomised, stepped-wedge cluster trial embedded in EFFECTS. The plan is to start ERUTECC with a running-in period of September 2017. The first intervention is due in October 2017, and the study will continue for 12 months. We are planning to intervene at all active centres in EFFECTS, except the five top recruiting centres (n=27). The rationale for not intervening at the top recruiting centres is that we believe they have reached their full potential and the intervention would be too weak for them. The hypothesis of this study is that a structured teleconference re-visit with the study personnel at the centres, accompanied by a commitment contract, can enhance recruitment by 20% 60 days post intervention, compared to 60 days pre-intervention, in an ongoing RCT. Discussion: EFFECTS is a large, pragmatic RCT of stroke in Sweden. Results from the embedded ERUTECC study could probably be generalised to high-income Western countries, and is relevant to trial management and could improve trial management in the future. It might also be useful in clinical settings outside the field of stroke.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2018
Keywords
Stroke, Randomised controlled trial, RCT, Recruitment, Randomised stepped-wedge cluster trial
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-221943 (URN)10.1186/s13063-017-2367-8 (DOI)000419608100004 ()29310679 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040447644 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180130

Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Rudberg, A.-S., Berge, E., Gustavsson, A., Näsman, P. & Lundström, E. (2018). Long-term health-related quality of life, survival and costs by different levels of functional outcome six months after stroke. European Stroke Journal, 3(2), 157-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term health-related quality of life, survival and costs by different levels of functional outcome six months after stroke
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2018 (English)In: European Stroke Journal, ISSN 2396-9873, E-ISSN 2396-9881, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Information about the impact of functional outcome after stroke is currently missing on health-related quality of life, survival and costs. This information would be valuable for health economic evaluations and for allocation of resources in stroke health care. Patients and methods: Data on 297 Swedish patients included in the Third International Stroke Trial were analysed including functional outcome at six months (measured by Oxford Handicap Scale), health-related quality of life up to 18 months (EQ-5D-3L) and survival up to 36 months. We used record linkage to collect data on costs up to 36 months, using national patient registers. Results: Patients with a better functional outcome level at six months had a significantly better health-related quality of life at 18 months (p<0.05), better long-term survival (p<0.05) and lower costs (p<0.001), for all time points up to 36 months. The difference in costs was mainly due to differences in days spent in hospital (p<0.005). Discussion: This study showed an association between functional outcome at six months and health-related quality of life up to 18 months, and costs up to 36 months. Conclusion: Functional outcome six months after stroke is an important determinant of health-related quality of life, survival and costs over 36 months. Effective interventions aimed at reducing short-term disability levels are therefore also expected to reduce the overall burden of stroke.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Stroke, quality adjusted life year, health economy, EQ-5D, functional level, survival
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228418 (URN)10.1177/2396987317753444 (DOI)000432064200008 ()
Note

QC 20180528

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Smaradottir, M. I., Ritsinger, V., Gyberg, V., Norhammar, A., Näsman, P. & Mellbin, L. G. (2017). Copeptin in patients with acute myocardial infarction and newly detected glucose abnormalities - A marker of increased stress susceptibility?: A report from the Glucose in Acute Myocardial Infarction cohort. Diabetes & Vascular Disease Research, 14(2), 69-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Copeptin in patients with acute myocardial infarction and newly detected glucose abnormalities - A marker of increased stress susceptibility?: A report from the Glucose in Acute Myocardial Infarction cohort
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2017 (English)In: Diabetes & Vascular Disease Research, ISSN 1479-1641, E-ISSN 1752-8984, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To characterize copeptin levels and to explore its prognostic importance in patients with acute myocardial infarction with newly detected glucose abnormalities. Methods: Copeptin was measured in 166 patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes and in 168 age- and gender-matched controls. Participants were classified as having normal glucose tolerance or abnormal glucose tolerance (impaired glucose tolerance + type 2 diabetes mellitus) by oral glucose tolerance test. Study participants were followed over a decade for major cardiovascular event (acute myocardial infarction/stroke/congestive heart failure/cardiovascular death), cardiovascular and total death. Results: Median copeptin level was higher in patients (10.5 pmol/L) than controls (5.9 pmol/L; p < 0.01). Patients with abnormal glucose tolerance had higher copeptin (12.2 pmol/L) than those with normal glucose tolerance (7.9 pmol/L; p < 0.01) but levels of copeptin did not differ in controls with abnormal glucose tolerance or normal glucose tolerance. Copeptin predicted major cardiovascular events [n = 64; hazard ratio = 1.15 (1.01-1.32; p = 0.04)], cardiovascular mortality [n = 29; hazard ratio = 1.24 (1.06-1.46; p = 0.01)] and total death [n = 51; hazard ratio = 1.21 (1.05-1.40; p = 0.01)] in unadjusted Cox regression analyses in the patient cohort. In controls, copeptin predicted major cardiovascular events [n = 26; hazard ratio = 1.17 (1.01-1.36; p = 0.03)]. Conclusion: Copeptin levels are highest among acute myocardial infarction patients with glucose disturbances and predict an adverse prognosis in unadjusted analyses. These findings imply that raised copeptin reflects stress rather than acting as a pathogenic factor for glucose abnormalities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
acute coronary syndrome, arginine vasopressin, biomarker, copeptin, Diabetes mellitus, prognosis
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207968 (URN)10.1177/1479164116664490 (DOI)000394677900002 ()28118730 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85012069966 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170531

Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Ritsinger, V., Brismar, K., Malmberg, K., Mellbin, L., Näsman, P., Rydén, L., . . . Norhammar, A. (2017). Elevated levels of adipokines predict outcome after acute myocardial infarction: A long-term follow-up of the Glucose Tolerance in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction cohort. Diabetes & Vascular Disease Research, 14(2), 77-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevated levels of adipokines predict outcome after acute myocardial infarction: A long-term follow-up of the Glucose Tolerance in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction cohort
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2017 (English)In: Diabetes & Vascular Disease Research, ISSN 1479-1641, E-ISSN 1752-8984, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Adiponectin and leptin are associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Information on the prognostic value after an acute myocardial infarction is still conflicting. Methods: Patients (n = 180) without known diabetes and with admission glucose of <11 mmol/L admitted for an acute myocardial infarction in 1998-2000 were followed for mortality and cardiovascular events (first of cardiovascular mortality/acute myocardial infarction/stroke/heart failure) until the end of 2011 (median: 11.6 years). Plasma adiponectin and leptin were related to outcome in Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses. Results: Median age was 64 years and 69% were male. Total mortality was 34% (n = 61) and 44% (n = 80) experienced a cardiovascular event. Adiponectin at discharge predicted cardiovascular events (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval; 1.45; 1.02-2.07, p = 0.038), total mortality (2.53; 1.64-3.91, p < 0.001) and cancer mortality (3.64; 1.51-8.74, p = 0.004). After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, previous myocardial infarction and heart failure, adiponectin predicted total mortality (1.79; 1.07-3.00, p = 0.027) but not cardiovascular events. High levels of leptin were associated with cardiovascular events during the first 7 years, after which the association was attenuated. Leptin did not predict total mortality. Conclusion: In patients with acute myocardial infarction but without previously known diabetes, high levels of adiponectin at discharge predicted total mortality. The present results support the hypothesis that high rather than low levels of adiponectin predict mortality after acute myocardial infarction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Acute myocardial infarction, adipokines, diabetes, prognosis
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207983 (URN)10.1177/1479164116678156 (DOI)000394677900003 ()28185529 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85012104646 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationThe Kamprad Family FoundationSwedish Diabetes AssociationThe Karolinska Institutet's Research FoundationNovo Nordisk
Note

QC 20170531

Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Ivert, T., Dalen, M., Ander, C., Stalesen, R., Näsman, P., Lordkipanidze, M. & Hjemdahl, P. (2017). Platelet function one and three months after coronary bypass surgery in relation to once or twice daily dosing of acetylsalicylic acid. Thrombosis Research, 149, 64-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Platelet function one and three months after coronary bypass surgery in relation to once or twice daily dosing of acetylsalicylic acid
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2017 (English)In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 149, p. 64-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Current guidelines recommend acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to reduce thrombotic vein graft occlusion. The optimal dosage of ASA is not known. Materials and methods: Forty-two patients undergoing elective CABG were randomized to receive either ASA 75 mg or 160 mg once daily (OD) or 75 mg twice daily (BID) after the operation. Platelet function testing was performed before, and one and three months after the operation. Results: White blood cell counts increased during the initial postoperative days whereas platelet countswere initially slightly reduced after the operation but increased after one month without any major changes of mean platelet volumes. Serum thromboxane B-2 was more effectively suppressed at one and three months after the operation with ASA 75 mg BID or 160 mg OD than with 75 mg OD (p < 0.001). ASA 75 mg BID and 160 mg OD were equally effective. Adenosine diphosphate stimulated platelet aggregation in whole blood (Multiplate (R)) was increased one and three months after the operation, and this was counteracted by ASA 75 mg BID but not by 75 or 160 mg OD. Arachidonic acid-induced aggregation was more effectively inhibited by 75 mg BID or 160 mg OD compared to 75 mg OD at three months. Conclusions: Less effective inhibition of platelet activation was obtained with ASA 75 mg OD than with ASA 160mg OD or 75mg BID up to three months after CABG. Especially the latter dose is of interest for further studies of efficacy and clinical outcomes after CABG.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Aspirin, Coronary artery bypass grafting, Individualized therapy, Platelet function, Thromboxane
National Category
Hematology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200755 (URN)10.1016/j.thromres.2016.11.018 (DOI)000391287300011 ()2-s2.0-84998656244 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170209

Available from: 2017-02-09 Created: 2017-02-09 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Graham, C., Lewis, S., Forbes, J., Mead, G., Hackett, M. L., Hankey, G. J., . . . Dennis, M. (2017). The FOCUS, AFFINITY and EFFECTS trials studying the effect(s) of fluoxetine in patients with a recent stroke: Statistical and health economic analysis plan for the trials and for the individual patient data meta-analysis. Trials, 18(1), Article ID 627.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The FOCUS, AFFINITY and EFFECTS trials studying the effect(s) of fluoxetine in patients with a recent stroke: Statistical and health economic analysis plan for the trials and for the individual patient data meta-analysis
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2017 (English)In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 627Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Small trials have suggested that fluoxetine may improve neurological recovery from stroke. FOCUS, AFFINITY and EFFECTS are a family of investigator-led, multicentre, parallel group, randomised, placebo-controlled trials which aim to determine whether the routine administration of fluoxetine (20 mg daily) for six months after an acute stroke improves patients' functional outcome. Methods/Design: The core protocol for the three trials has been published (Mead et al., Trials 20:369, 2015). The trials include patients aged 18 years and older with a clinical diagnosis of stroke and persisting focal neurological deficits at randomisation 2-15 days after stroke onset. Patients are randomised centrally via each trials' web-based randomisation system using a common minimisation algorithm. Patients are allocated fluoxetine 20 mg once daily or matching placebo capsules for six months. The primary outcome measure is the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at six months. Secondary outcomes include: living circumstances; the Stroke Impact Scale; EuroQol (EQ5D-5 L); the vitality subscale of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF36); diagnosis of depression; adherence to medication; serious adverse events including death and recurrent stroke; and resource use at six and 12 months and the mRS at 12 months. Discussion: Minor variations have been tailored to the national setting in the UK (FOCUS), Australia, New Zealand and Vietnam (AFFINITY) and Sweden (EFFECTS). Each trial is run and funded independently and will report its own results. A prospectively planned individual patient data meta-analysis of all three trials will provide the most precise estimate of the overall effect and establish whether any effects differ between trials or subgroups. This statistical analysis plan describes the core analyses for all three trials and that for the individual patient data meta-analysis. Recruitment and follow-up in the FOCUS trial is expected to be completed by the end of 2018. AFFINITY and EFFECTS are likely to complete follow-up in 2020.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd., 2017
Keywords
Antidepressants, Depression, Fluoxetine, Haemorrhagic stroke, Ischaemic stroke, Recovery, SSRI, acute coronary syndrome, algorithm, Article, automutilation, brain hemorrhage, brain ischemia, cerebrovascular accident, clinical protocol, cognition, death, drug effect, falling, fracture, functional status, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, health economics, health status, human, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, medication compliance, meta analysis, mood, neurologic disease, outcome assessment, quality of life, Rankin scale, recurrent disease, seizure, Short Form 36, side effect, suicide attempt, survival, treatment duration, treatment outcome, upper gastrointestinal bleeding
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-227107 (URN)10.1186/s13063-017-2385-6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85039552548 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

QC 20180515

Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ritsinger, V., Brismar, K., Malmberg, K., Mellbin, L., Näsman, P., Ryden, L., . . . Norhammar, A. (2016). Elevated levels of adipokines predict outcome after acute myocardial infarction. Long-term follow-up of the GAMI cohort. Paper presented at Congress of the European-Society-of-Cardiology (ESC), AUG 27-31, 2016, Rome, ITALY. EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, 37, 459-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevated levels of adipokines predict outcome after acute myocardial infarction. Long-term follow-up of the GAMI cohort
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2016 (English)In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, ISSN 0195-668X, Vol. 37, p. 459-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-199997 (URN)000383869502195 ()
Conference
Congress of the European-Society-of-Cardiology (ESC), AUG 27-31, 2016, Rome, ITALY
Note

QC 20170206

Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2017-02-06Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Dahlström, U., Edner, M., Näsman, P., Ryden, L. & Norhammar, A. (2016). Glycosylated haemoglobin predicts mortality in patients with heart failure and unknown diabetes: insights from the Swedish heart failure registry (SwedeHF). Paper presented at Congress of the European-Society-of-Cardiology (ESC), AUG 27-31, 2016, Rome, ITALY. EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, 37, 733-733
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glycosylated haemoglobin predicts mortality in patients with heart failure and unknown diabetes: insights from the Swedish heart failure registry (SwedeHF)
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2016 (English)In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, ISSN 0195-668X, Vol. 37, p. 733-733Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-199998 (URN)000383869503439 ()
Conference
Congress of the European-Society-of-Cardiology (ESC), AUG 27-31, 2016, Rome, ITALY
Note

QC 20170206

Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2017-02-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7606-8771

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