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Broström, Anders, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0820-2769
Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Broström, A. (2019). Academic breeding grounds: Home department conditions and early career performance of academic researchers. Research Policy, 48(7), 1647-1665
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Academic breeding grounds: Home department conditions and early career performance of academic researchers
2019 (English)In: Research Policy, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 1647-1665Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates how research group characteristics relate to the early career success of PhD candidates who are trained in the group. In particular, I study how the citation impact of early-career PhDs is related to the staff composition and funding of the group. Using data on a cohort of Swedish doctoral graduates in science, engineering, mathematics and medicine, two sets of findings are obtained. First, students who were trained in groups with a lower number of PhD students perform better in terms of academic productivity. From the perspective of research policy, this finding suggests a decreasing return to funding additional PhD student positions allocated to professors who are already maintaining larger research groups. Second, PhD students trained in groups with funding for PhD research that is conditioned by funder influence over the topic of thesis research are more likely to stay in academia. Controlling for career destination, however, PhDs from such groups have lower than average scientific productivity and citation impact. These results suggest that finders of PhD studies face a trade-off between the two different funding objectives of "getting what they want" in terms of research content and fostering successful scholars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2019
Keywords
Economic and social effects, Finance, Information analysis, Productivity, Students, Academic careers, PhD studies, Research funding, Research groups, Research performance, Engineering research
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252024 (URN)10.1016/j.respol.2019.03.009 (DOI)000470952000004 ()2-s2.0-85064198806 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190625

Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Astebro, T., Braguinsky, S., Braunerhjelm, P. & Broström, A. (2019). Academic Entrepreneurship: The Bayh-Dole Act versus the Professor's Privilege. Industrial & labor relations review, 72(5), 1094-1122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Academic Entrepreneurship: The Bayh-Dole Act versus the Professor's Privilege
2019 (English)In: Industrial & labor relations review, ISSN 0019-7939, E-ISSN 2162-271X, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 1094-1122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Is the Bayh-Dole intellectual property regime associated with more and better academic entrepreneurship than the Professor's Privilege regime? The authors examine data on US PhDs in the natural sciences, engineering, and medical fields who became entrepreneurs in 1993-2006 and compare this to similar data from Sweden. They find that, in both countries, those with an academic background have lower rates of entry into entrepreneurship than do those with a non-academic background. The relative rate of academics starting entrepreneurial firms is slightly lower in the United States than in Sweden. Moreover, the mean economic gains from becoming an entrepreneur are negative, both for PhDs originating in academia and for non-academic settings in both countries. Analysis indicates that selection into entrepreneurship occurs from the lower part of the ability distribution among academics. The results suggest that policies supporting entrepreneurial decisions by younger, tenure-track academics may be more effective than are general incentives to increase academic entrepreneurship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2019
Keywords
academic entrepreneurship, innovation, royalty sharing, Bayh-Dole, Professor's Privilege
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-261003 (URN)10.1177/0019793918819809 (DOI)000484519900003 ()2-s2.0-85060033772 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191003

Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved
Broström, A., Ekman Rising, M., Geschwind, L., Lindgren, M. & Packendorff, J. (2019). Instrumentalisation of academic work: Creeping, myopic and individualising processes and their consequences. In: : . Paper presented at Annual programme conference on Long term provision of knowledge. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instrumentalisation of academic work: Creeping, myopic and individualising processes and their consequences
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2019
National Category
Business Administration Economics
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252689 (URN)
Conference
Annual programme conference on Long term provision of knowledge
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Note

QCR 20190819

Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Broström, A., Feldmann, A. & Kaulio, M. A. (2019). Structured relations between higher education institutions and external organisations: opportunity or bureaucratisation?. Higher Education, 78(4), 575-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structured relations between higher education institutions and external organisations: opportunity or bureaucratisation?
2019 (English)In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 575-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the introduction of centrally coordinated initiatives aimed at formalising universities' relationships to external organisations. Such initiatives are referred to as structured relations. Based on a review of nine Swedish Universities, we identify three types of structured relation initiatives (network events, collaboration platforms, partnership agreements). In common for all structured relations identified are that they offer new opportunities to manage external expectations on universities, in particular as regards their ability to demonstrate their commitment to outreach activities. The formalisation of outreach activities challenges the academic tradition of giving individual professors discretionary mandates to enter and manage external relationships. Drawing on a collective action perspective, we analyse the tensions that are generated when universities introduce new elements of support and central coordination of outreach activities. The introduction of structured relations potentially contributes to changing the nature of the university as an organisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2019
Keywords
Entrepreneurial university, University-industry, Managerialism, Outreach, Technology transfer, Academic engagement
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-261964 (URN)10.1007/s10734-019-0359-1 (DOI)000487120900001 ()2-s2.0-85060988675 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191014

Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
Broström, A. & McKelvey, M. (2018). Engaging Experts: Science-Policy Interactions and the Introduction of Congestion Charging in Stockholm. Minerva, 56(2), 183-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engaging Experts: Science-Policy Interactions and the Introduction of Congestion Charging in Stockholm
2018 (English)In: Minerva, ISSN 0026-4695, E-ISSN 1573-1871, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 183-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyzes the conditions for mobilizing the science base for development of public policy. It does so by focusing upon the science-policy interface, specifically the processes of direct interaction between scientists and scientifically trained experts, on the one hand, and agents of policymaking organizations, on the other. The article defines two dimensions - cognitive distance and expert autonomy - which are argued to influence knowledge exchange, in such a way as to shape the outcome. A case study on the implementation of congestion charges in Stockholm, Sweden, illustrates how the proposed framework pinpoints three central issues for understanding these processes: (1) Differentiating the roles of, e.g., a science-based consultancy firm and an academic environment in policy formation; (2) Examining the fit between the organizational form of the science-policy interface and the intended goals; and (3) Increasing our understanding of when policymaker agents themselves need to develop scientific competence in order to interact effectively with scientific experts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Organizational learning, Science-based policy, Evidence-based policy, Interaction, Cognitive distance, Congestion charges
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228422 (URN)10.1007/s11024-017-9331-3 (DOI)000431960500003 ()2-s2.0-85026555291 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180529

Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2018-05-29Bibliographically approved
Lougui, M. & Broström, A. (2018). The Labor Market Value of Experience from Temporary Self-employment. In: : . Paper presented at DRUID18, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 11-13, 2018. Copenhagen Business School Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Labor Market Value of Experience from Temporary Self-employment
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the evaluation of experience from self-employment on the Swedish labormarket. Specically, we analyze the wage remuneration of individuals moving from a spell inself-employment to regular employment as compared to a control group of individuals withoutsuch experience. To tackle the challenge of estimating the average eect of treatment, we seekto reduce unobserved heterogeneity across groups by only considering individuals moving intoself-employment after being displaced in the context of employer exit, and setting up the controlgroup to consist of individuals moving from the same exiting rms into new employment. Tofurther ensure similarity on key observables with the treated group, we select the control groupthrough coarsened exact matching. Our results demonstrate that the average treatment eect ispositive. In further exploration, we nd evidence suggesting that this eect is at least partiallydriven by self-employment experiences being positively evaluated for jobs requiring general andmanagerial skills rather than industry-specic expertise.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen Business School Press, 2018
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-238618 (URN)
Conference
DRUID18, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 11-13, 2018
Note

QC 20181213

Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Mohammadi, A., Broström, A. & Franzoni, C. (2017). Workforce Composition and Innovation: How Diversity in Employees' Ethnic and Educational Backgrounds Facilitates Firm-Level Innovativeness. The Journal of product innovation management, 34(4), 406-426
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workforce Composition and Innovation: How Diversity in Employees' Ethnic and Educational Backgrounds Facilitates Firm-Level Innovativeness
2017 (English)In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 406-426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article studies how workforce composition is related to a firm's success in introducing radical innovations. Previous studies have argued that teams composed of individuals with diverse backgrounds are able to perform more information processing and make deeper use of the information, which is important to accomplish complex tasks. We suggest that this argument can be extended to the level of the aggregate workforce of high-technology firms. In particular, we argue that ethnic and higher education diversity within the workforce is associated with superior performance in radical innovation. Using a sample of 3,888 Swedish firms, this article demonstrates that having greater workforce diversity in terms of both ethnic background and educational disciplinary background is positively correlated to the share of a firm's turnover generated by radical innovation. Having more external collaborations does, however, seem to reduce the importance of educational background diversity. The impact of ethnic diversity is not affected by external collaboration. These findings hold after using alternative measures of dependent and independent variables, alternative sample sizes, and alternative estimation techniques. The research findings presented in this article would seem to have immediate and important practical implications. They would suggest that companies may pursue recruitment policies inspired by greater ethnic and disciplinary diversity as a way to boost the innovativeness of the organization. From a managerial perspective, it may be concluded that workforce disciplinary diversity could be potentially replaced by more external links, while ethnic diversity could not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-210465 (URN)10.1111/jpim.12388 (DOI)000402673100002 ()2-s2.0-85019050940 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170706

Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2018-03-17Bibliographically approved
Geschwind, L. & Broström, A. (2015). Managing the teaching-research nexus: ideals and practice in research-oriented universities. Higher Education Research and Development, 34(1), 60-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing the teaching-research nexus: ideals and practice in research-oriented universities
2015 (English)In: Higher Education Research and Development, ISSN 0729-4360, E-ISSN 1469-8366, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 60-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper demonstrates that while ideals of close linkages between research and teaching are widely embraced in research-oriented universities, a practice of division of labour between teaching-oriented and research-oriented staff persists. In an investigation of how the research–teaching nexus is managed at three Swedish universities, we identify a perceived misalignment between institutional incentives for individual academic staff and the needs of teaching. Under pressure from such tensions, managers are forced to deploy pragmatic strategies for the staffing of undergraduate education tasks. This includes allowing research needs and agendas to take priority over teaching needs. While managers seek to secure the participation of senior researchers in education, they often actively prefer to delegate the bulk of teaching activities to less research-active staff. Such strategies seem to reinforce existing patterns of division of labour among academic staff.

Keywords
academic career, academic work, higher education policy, leadership, teaching–research nexus
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-161735 (URN)10.1080/07294360.2014.934332 (DOI)000349534600005 ()2-s2.0-84902444929 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150319

Available from: 2015-03-15 Created: 2015-03-15 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Broström, A., Lougui, M. & Johansson, F. (2015). Mergers and acquisitions in the coming-to-age phase of the Swedish ICT services industry. In: E. Giertz, A. Rickne & P. Rouvinen (Ed.), Small and beautiful: The ICT success of Finland and Sweden (pp. 147-155). VINNOVA
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mergers and acquisitions in the coming-to-age phase of the Swedish ICT services industry
2015 (English)In: Small and beautiful: The ICT success of Finland and Sweden / [ed] E. Giertz, A. Rickne & P. Rouvinen, VINNOVA , 2015, p. 147-155Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Industrial consolidation through mergers and acquisitions has been important for development of the IT sector. M&As constituted a force of creative destruction parallel to the mechanism of exit through bankruptcy. Drawing on new empiricalevidence, we argue that M&As also provided new impulses and opportunities for entrepreneurship and stimulated between-firm job mobility of key persons in the sector. We conclude that the intensive M&A-activity of the period contributed to renewal and growth of the ICT software and services industry at large, but did not lead to the creation of new Swedish-based multinationals in the sector.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
VINNOVA, 2015
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-178417 (URN)9789187537332 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20151215

Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2015-12-15Bibliographically approved
Broström, A. & McKelvey, M. (2015). Universities and Public Research Institutes as Collaboration Partners. In: Karlsson, C., Gråsjö, U., Wixe, S. (Ed.), Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy: Knowledge, Technology and Internationalization (pp. 44-64). Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Universities and Public Research Institutes as Collaboration Partners
2015 (English)In: Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy: Knowledge, Technology and Internationalization / [ed] Karlsson, C., Gråsjö, U., Wixe, S., Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 44-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We examine how firms assess the value of R & D partnerships with two types of public research organizations: public research institutes (PRIs) and universities. Survey data on Swedish engineering and manufacturing firms suggest that contacts with universities provide firms with impulses to innovation and offer opportunities to learn to a higher extent that contacts with PRIs. Guided by a view of institutes as more oriented towards applied R & D than universities, we also test whether managers perceive institute contacts as contributing more strongly to short-term R & D projects than universities. This hypothesis cannot, however, be verified. Our results suggest that, in terms of perceived effects of R & D managers, PRIs and universities are more similar as collaboration partners than would be expected, given the differing institutional set-ups. Implications for current discussions about the role of PRIs in national research and innovation systems are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-178415 (URN)10.4337/9781783477326.00009 (DOI)2-s2.0-85039067047 (Scopus ID)978 1 78347 731 9 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20151215

Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0820-2769

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