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Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Braunerhjelm, P., Thulin, P. & Holmquist, C. (2019). Entreprenörskap i Sverige 2018 – nationell GEM rapport 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entreprenörskap i Sverige 2018 – nationell GEM rapport 2019
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 67
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260524 (URN)
Note

QC 20191015

Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Braunerhjelm, P., Eklund, J. & Thulin, P. (2019). Taxes, the tax adminstrative burden and the entrepreneurial life cycle. Small Business Economics, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taxes, the tax adminstrative burden and the entrepreneurial life cycle
2019 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a modified version of the entrepreneurial choice model, where it is shown that the expected utility of becoming an entrepreneur is decreasing in both the levels of taxes and the tax administrative burden. We extend previous empirical findings by examining how these variables influence entrepreneurs at different stages in the entrepreneurial life cycle. Our findings imply that the effect of the tax administrative burden varies over the entrepreneurial life cycle from strongly negative to insignificant. The most pronounced negative effects appear in the early stages of entrepreneurship. We conclude that a 10% reduction in the tax administrative burden increases the propensity for new business establishments by 4%. Our findings support the idea that tax simplification is one way to encourage entrepreneurship, without any reduction in tax revenues.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260516 (URN)
Note

QC 20191015

Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-10-15Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L., Andersson, M. & Thulin, P. (2018). Human capital sorting: The "when" and "who" of the sorting of educated workers to urban regions. Journal of regional science, 58(3), 581-610
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human capital sorting: The "when" and "who" of the sorting of educated workers to urban regions
2018 (English)In: Journal of regional science, ISSN 0022-4146, E-ISSN 1467-9787, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 581-610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The sorting of high-ability workers is often advanced as one source of spatial disparities in economic outcomes. There are still few papers that analyze when human capital sorting occurs and whom it involves. Using data on 16 cohorts of university graduates in Sweden, we demonstrate significant sorting to urban regions on high school grades and education levels of parents, i.e., two attributes typically associated with latent abilities that are valued in the labor market. A large part of this sorting has already occurred in deciding where to study, because the top universities in Sweden are predominantly located in urban regions. The largest part of directed sorting on ability indicators occurs in the decision of where to study. Even after controlling for sorting prior to labor market entry, the best and brightest are still more likely to start working in urban regions. However, this effect appears to be driven by Sweden's main metropolitan region, Stockholm. We find no influence of our ability indicators on the probability of starting to work in urban regions after graduation when Stockholm is excluded. Studies of human capital sorting need to account for selection processes to and from universities, because neglecting mobility prior to labor market entry is likely to lead to an underestimation of the extent of the sorting to urban regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
ability, geography of talent, human capital, labor mobility, migration, spatial selection, spatial sorting, university graduates
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231208 (URN)10.1111/jors.12366 (DOI)000434277600004 ()2-s2.0-85048331478 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-80Swedish Research Council, 349200680Vinnova, 2010-07370
Note

QC 20180629

Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Braunerhjelm, P., Ding, D. & Thulin, P. (2015). Does Labour Mobility Foster Innovation?: Evidence from Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at 15th International Conference of the International Joseph A. Schumpeter Society (ISS).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Labour Mobility Foster Innovation?: Evidence from Sweden
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

By utilising a Swedish unique, matched employer-employee dataset that has been pooled with firm-level patent application data, we provide new evidence that knowledge workers’ mobility has a positive and strongly significant impact on firm innovation output, as measured by firm patent applications. The effect is particularly strong for knowledge workers that have previously worked in a patenting firm (the learning-by-hiring effect), but firms losing a knowledge worker are also shown to benefit (the diaspora effect), albeit more weakly. Finally, the effect is more pronounced when the joining worker originates in another region.

Keywords
Labour mobility; knowledge diffusion; innovation; social networks
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-183998 (URN)
Conference
15th International Conference of the International Joseph A. Schumpeter Society (ISS)
Note

QC 20160329

Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2016-04-01Bibliographically approved
Braunerhjelm, P., Ding, D. & Thulin, P. (2015). Labour as a knowledge carrier: how increased mobilityinfluences entrepreneurship. Journal of Technology Transfer, 41(6), 1308-1326
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Labour as a knowledge carrier: how increased mobilityinfluences entrepreneurship
2015 (English)In: Journal of Technology Transfer, ISSN 0892-9912, E-ISSN 1573-7047, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1308-1326Article in journal (Refereed) [Artistic work] Published
Abstract [en]

According to the knowledge-based spillover theory of entrepreneurship (KSTE), entrepreneurship is positively associated with the knowledge endowment level. An increase in knowledge expands the opportunity set, which is then exploited by heterogeneous entrepreneurs. The objective of this paper is to empirically test the validity of the KSTE by employing a detailed database comprising more than 19 million observations for the period 2001–2008 at the level of individuals, firms and regions in Sweden. Knowledge is claimed to be partly embodied in labour, implying that an increase in labour mobility can be expected to influence knowledge endowment at the regional level. Our dependent variable is an individual who has remained in a region throughout the time period considered. Controlling for a number of other variables, inter-regional labour inflows and intra-regional mobility levels are shown to exert a strong positive effect on entrepreneurship. This contrasts with inter-regional outflows, which negatively affect entrepreneurial entry. Another noteworthy result is that the probability of exploiting an increased knowledge stock through entrepreneurship increases by 15 % points if the individual has previous experience in starting a firm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2015
Keywords
Entrepreneurship Knowledge-based spillover theory of entrepreneurship Knowledge diffusion Labour mobility
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-183995 (URN)10.1007/s10961-015-9452-5 (DOI)000387231700004 ()2-s2.0-84945538861 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160329

Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2020-03-10Bibliographically approved
Braunerhjelm, P., Ding, D. & Thulin, P. (2014). Labor market flexibility, growth and innovation: the case of Sweden. In: Pontus Braunerhjelm och Johan Eklund (Ed.), En fungerande arbetsmarknad: nyckel till innovation och kunskapsdriven tillväxt. Entreprenörskapsforum
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Labor market flexibility, growth and innovation: the case of Sweden
2014 (English)In: En fungerande arbetsmarknad: nyckel till innovation och kunskapsdriven tillväxt / [ed] Pontus Braunerhjelm och Johan Eklund, Entreprenörskapsforum , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Entreprenörskapsforum, 2014
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-185868 (URN)9789189301696 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20160510

Available from: 2016-04-28 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2016-05-10Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L., Andersson, M. & Thulin, P. (2014). Market Thickness and the Early Labour Market Career of University Graduates: An Urban Advantage?. Spatial Economic Analysis, 9(4), 396-419
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Market Thickness and the Early Labour Market Career of University Graduates: An Urban Advantage?
2014 (English)In: Spatial Economic Analysis, ISSN 1742-1772, E-ISSN 1742-1780, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 396-419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We analyse the influence of market thickness for skills on initial wages and the early job market career of university graduates. Using Swedish micro-level panel data on a cohort of graduates, we show that two out of three graduates move to large cities upon graduation. Large cities increase employment probabilities and yield higher rewards to human capital, even after controlling for employment selection. The premium on initial wages for graduates in urban regions is in the interval of 5-6%, and we estimate a wage-growth premium of about 2-4%. Thicker markets for skills appear as a key reason for the concentration of graduates to larger cities.

Keywords
matching, mobility, agglomeration economies, job switching, university graduates, market thickness, urban wage premium, Human capital
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-157623 (URN)10.1080/17421772.2014.961534 (DOI)000344776700004 ()2-s2.0-84911891439 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20141211

[epaisseur du marche initial de l'emploi pour les diplomes universitaires - un avantage en ville?]

Available from: 2014-12-11 Created: 2014-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. & Thulin, P. (2013). Does spatial employment density spur inter-firm job switching?. The annals of regional science, 51(1), 245-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does spatial employment density spur inter-firm job switching?
2013 (English)In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 245-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inter-firm job switching of workers is a much cited but seldom measured source of the productivity advantages of spatial employment density. It has been advanced as a conduit for localized knowledge flows as well as labor market matching efficiency. Using a matched employer-employee dataset for Sweden, we estimate the influence spatial employment density has on the probability of inter-firm job switching of private sector workers. Our estimates suggest that a doubling of employment density per square kilometer increases the probability that a random worker switches employer by 0.2 % points. The same effect is substantially higher for more skilled workers. While the effect of a doubling of density is limited, the actual differences in density across the regions in our data amount to a factor over 40, rendering differences in density an important explanation for regional variations in rates of inter-firm job switching.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
Agglomeration Economies, Labor Mobility, Knowledge, Productivity, Cities, Regions, Accessibility, Localization, Spillovers, Growth
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-124711 (URN)10.1007/s00168-012-0544-y (DOI)000320780800012 ()2-s2.0-84873871260 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20130729

Available from: 2013-07-29 Created: 2013-07-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Moretti, E. & Thulin, P. (2013). Local multipliers and human capital in the United States and Sweden. Industrial and Corporate Change, 22(1), 339-362
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local multipliers and human capital in the United States and Sweden
2013 (English)In: Industrial and Corporate Change, ISSN 0960-6491, E-ISSN 1464-3650, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 339-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We show that every time a local economy generates a new job by attracting a new business in the traded sector, a significant number of additional jobs are created in the non-traded sector. This multiplier effect is particularly large for jobs with high levels of human capital and for high-technology industries. These findings are important for local development policies, as they suggest that to increase local employment levels, municipalities should target high-technology employers with high levels of human capital.

National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-118598 (URN)10.1093/icc/dts051 (DOI)000314117600012 ()2-s2.0-84873854349 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20130222

Available from: 2013-02-22 Created: 2013-02-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M., Braunerhjelm, P. & Thulin, P. (2012). Creative Destruction and Productivity: Entrepreneurship by Type, Sector and Sequence. Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, 1(2), 125-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creative Destruction and Productivity: Entrepreneurship by Type, Sector and Sequence
2012 (English)In: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, ISSN 2045-2101, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 125-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – Schumpeter claimed the entrepreneur to be instrumental for creative destruction and industrial dynamics. Entrepreneurial entry serves to transform and revitalize industries, thereby enhancing their competitiveness. The purpose of this paper is to investigate if entry of new firms influences productivity amongst incumbent firms, and the extent to which altered productivity can be attributed sector and time specific effects.

Design/methodology/approach – Implementing a unique dataset the paper estimates a firm-level production function in which the productivity of incumbent firms is modeled as a function of firm attributes and regional entrepreneurship activity.

Findings – The analysis finds support for positive productivity effects of entrepreneurship on incumbent firms, albeit the effect varies over time, what the authors refer to as a “delayed entry effect”. An immediate negative influence on productivity is followed by a positive effect several years after the initial entry. Moreover, the productivity of incumbent firms in services sectors appears to be more responsive to regional entrepreneurship, as compared to the productivity of manufacturing firms.

Originality/value – The paper employs a firm-level production function approach allowing for time lags of the effect of entrepreneurship. The unique data implemented allow the authors to identify genuinely new ventures as compared to those associated with reorganizations of existing businesses, thereby overcoming much of data deficiencies in previous studies. In addition, data are distributed on Swedish functional labor market regions.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-107452 (URN)10.1108/20452101211261417 (DOI)2-s2.0-84891441592 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20121213

Available from: 2012-12-11 Created: 2012-12-11 Last updated: 2020-03-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8377-1633

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