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Publications (10 of 92) Show all publications
Jaldemark, J., Hrastinski, S., Olofsson, A. D. & Öberg, L.-M. (2018). Editorial introduction: Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies. British Journal of Educational Technology, 49(2), 201-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial introduction: Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 201-206Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-223247 (URN)10.1111/bjet.12596 (DOI)000424333000001 ()2-s2.0-85034225816 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180219

Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved
Hill, C., Creswell, C., Vigerland, S., Nauta, M. H., March, S., Donovan, C., . . . Kendall, P. C. (2018). Navigating the development and dissemination of internet cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for anxiety disorders in children and young people: A consensus statement with recommendations from the #iCBTLorentz Workshop Group. Internet Interventions, 12, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Navigating the development and dissemination of internet cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for anxiety disorders in children and young people: A consensus statement with recommendations from the #iCBTLorentz Workshop Group
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2018 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 12, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Initial internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) programs for anxiety disorders in children and young people (CYP) have been developed and evaluated, however these have not yet been widely adopted in routine practice. The lack of guidance and formalized approaches to the development and dissemination of iCBT has arguably contributed to the difficulty in developing iCBT that is scalable and sustainable beyond academic evaluation and that can ultimately be adopted by healthcare providers. This paper presents a consensus statement and recommendations from a workshop of international experts in CYP anxiety and iCBT (#iCBTLorentz Workshop Group) on the development, evaluation, engagement and dissemination of iCBT for anxiety in CYP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Adolescents, Anxiety, Children, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Development, Dissemination, Online treatments
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-224236 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2018.02.002 (DOI)2-s2.0-85042619047 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180315

Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Stenbom, S., Cleveland-Innes, M. & Hrastinski, S. (2016). Emotional presence in a relationship of inquiry: The case of one-to-one online math coaching. Online Learning, 20(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional presence in a relationship of inquiry: The case of one-to-one online math coaching
2016 (English)In: Online Learning, ISSN 1092-8235, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Emotions have been confirmed to be a critical component of the process of learning. In the online Community of Inquiry theoretical framework, and the recently suggested online Relationship of Inquiry framework, emotions are considered a subsection of social presence. In this study, the concept of emotional presence is examined. This examination occurs within the Relationship of Inquiry framework, developed to analyze one-to-one online coaching. A survey of online coaches and a transcript coding procedure from the online coaching service Math Coach provide the data for the study. The results indicate that a Relationship of Inquiry framework consisting of cognitive, social, teaching, and emotional presence enhances the exploration of one-to-one online coaching settings. The interpretation of these results identifies emotional presence as an essential and distinct part of one-to-one online math coaching.

Keywords
Online coaching, Relationship of Inquiry, Community of Inquiry, Emotion, Emotional presence
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-166648 (URN)000374407500004 ()2-s2.0-84962073300 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160418

Available from: 2015-05-13 Created: 2015-05-13 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved
Stenbom, S. (2016). Online Coaching as Teacher Training: Using a Relationship of Inquiry Framework. In: Ostashewski, N.; Cleveland-Innes, M.; Howell, J. (Ed.), Optimizing K-12 Education through Online and Blended Learning: . Hershey, PA: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online Coaching as Teacher Training: Using a Relationship of Inquiry Framework
2016 (English)In: Optimizing K-12 Education through Online and Blended Learning / [ed] Ostashewski, N.; Cleveland-Innes, M.; Howell, J., Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Using the Internet for educational purposes is now commonly accepted. More challenging is the realizationof this potential, particularly in the K-12 education environment. According to the growing literatureon this topic, using Internet technology during K-12 teacher training will provide more knowledge andskills for teachers wishing to use Internet technology in their own classrooms. In an adaption of theonline Community of Inquiry, a revised framework for one-to-one online teaching was developed. In theRelationship of Inquiry framework, the elements of cognitive, teaching, social, and emotional presenceoutline the educational experience of one student receiving learning support from one teacher. Theframework was tested with pre-service teachers using the Math Coach program which offers help withmathematics just-in-time via instant messaging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016
Series
Advances in Early Childhood and K-12 Education (AECKE), ISSN 2329-5929
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-190093 (URN)2-s2.0-85014243226 (Scopus ID)9781522505075 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20160808

Available from: 2016-08-08 Created: 2016-08-08 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved
Leino Lindell, T., Hrastinski, S. & Skogh, I.-B. (2015). Exploring students’ Multimodal mobile use as support for school assignments. In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition; Washington Convention CenterSeattle; United States. , 122(122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring students’ Multimodal mobile use as support for school assignments
2015 (English)In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2015, Vol. 122, no 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for SocietyConference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper engages with how students use multimodality on mobile devices as support for school assignments. The broader aim of this pilot study is to explore understanding of teachers’ and students’ expressed experiences of students’ multimodal mobile use. Focus group interviews and multimodal analysis have allowed investigation of the following research questions: - What experiences do teachers and students express from students’ multimodal mobile use related to school assignments? - Which advantages and disadvantages have teachers and students expressed concerning students’ multimodal mobile use as support for school assignments? The results show that students and teachers have many different experiences of students’ multimodal mobile use related to school assignments. However, the use is limited in several ways. To a large extent teachers and students have expressed that multimodal mobile resources can be used advantageously by students to support school assignments for several purposes. Among disadvantages identified mobile device multimodality in some respects can be disruptive. The result also indicates that different multimodal mobile media have specific possibilities for supporting students’ learning as it is related to school assignments.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-174736 (URN)2-s2.0-84941996019 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition; Washington Convention CenterSeattle; United States
Note

QC 20151013

Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2017-02-08Bibliographically approved
Cleveland-Innes, M., Stenbom, S. & Hrastinski, S. (2015). Faculty change in engineering education: Case study of a blended course about blended and online learning. In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition; Washington Convention CenterSeattle; United States. (122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faculty change in engineering education: Case study of a blended course about blended and online learning
2015 (English)In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2015, no 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for SocietyConference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports results from a case study of teaching development in engineering education at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, in answer to the research question "what impact, if any, does participation in a blended course about teaching in blended face-to-face and online formats have on faculty views about teaching in engineering education?" Early results indicate that 1) faculty can assess the value of online and blended learning through this experience, 2) faculty engaged actively in online and face-to-face discussions of pedagogy, 3) disciplinary differences in the application of online and blended learning are a concern to STEM faculty, and 4) the evaluation and implementation, if any, of online and blended learning in engineering education has to include discussions beyond the use of applicable technologies.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-174740 (URN)2-s2.0-84941993599 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition; Washington Convention CenterSeattle; United States
Note

QC 20151012

Available from: 2015-10-12 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2015-10-12Bibliographically approved
Cleveland-Innes, M., Hrastinski, S., Bälter, O. & Wiseman, C. (2015). Pedagogical development, E-learning and teaching in higher education. In: International Handbook of E-learning Volume 1: Theoretical Perspectives and Research (pp. 93-114). Taylor and Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedagogical development, E-learning and teaching in higher education
2015 (English)In: International Handbook of E-learning Volume 1: Theoretical Perspectives and Research, Taylor and Francis , 2015, p. 93-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis, 2015
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-187437 (URN)2-s2.0-84960203926 (Scopus ID)9781317643654 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20160523

Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2017-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hrastinski, S. & Monstad, T. (2014). Exploring the relationship between the use of an interactive video website and organizational learning. New Media and Society, 16(4), 594-614
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the relationship between the use of an interactive video website and organizational learning
2014 (English)In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 594-614Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we explore the impact of the use of an interactive video website, comprising videos promoting a company's core values, on organizational learning. More specifically, we studied how the use of a video website affected the awareness of a company's core values and whether or not this would also influence the behaviour of the employees. Two web surveys were designed for the study. The first survey was conducted prior to introducing the video website. The second survey was a follow-up survey in order to assess cognitive and behavioural effects. As a complement, we also conducted focus groups. We identified a slightly negative effect on cognition and behaviour. A number of factors that might explain the negative effect were identified. Employees that perceived themselves as active participants were more likely to prefer video, were more satisfied and perceived greater positive effect on cognition and behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
Behavioural development, cognitive development, internal communication, organizational learning, video website, web 2.0, work-place learning
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-147033 (URN)10.1177/1461444813487961 (DOI)000336262900004 ()2-s2.0-84901045712 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20140624

Available from: 2014-06-24 Created: 2014-06-23 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Hrastinski, S., Edman, A., Andersson, F., Kawnine, T. & Soames, C. (2014). Informal math coaching by instant messaging: Two case studies of how university students coach K-12 students. Interactive Learning Environments, 22(1), 84-96
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Informal math coaching by instant messaging: Two case studies of how university students coach K-12 students
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2014 (English)In: Interactive Learning Environments, ISSN 1049-4820, E-ISSN 1744-5191, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 84-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to describe and explore how instant messaging (IM) can be used to support informal math coaching. We have studied two projects where university students use IM to coach K-12 students in mathematics. The coaches were interviewed with a focus on how informal coaching works by examining coaching challenges, how coaching can be organized, whether coaching should be anonymous or personal, which tools can be used and how informal math coaching supports learning. Research shows that generating and answering questions are important in the process of understanding and learning, which means that both the students and the coaches can learn math through this type of project. The coaches perceive informal math coaching as complementing online math forums. For students to learn effectively, the coaches need to be able to interpret the students' competence level in order to coach on a level that is within their development zone. It seems particularly challenging to coach at the right level when using IM and, therefore, it is important to establish a personal relationship with the students.

Keywords
instant messaging, mathematics, informal learning, online learning
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-53720 (URN)10.1080/10494820.2011.641682 (DOI)000329898700007 ()2-s2.0-84893011423 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20140213

Available from: 2011-12-29 Created: 2011-12-29 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Stenbom, S., Cleveland-Innes, M. & Hrastinski, S. (2014). Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: Mathematics, online help, and emotional presence. In: : . Paper presented at The Canadian Network for Innovation in Education Conference, May 13-16, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: Mathematics, online help, and emotional presence
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Math Coach program provides help with mathematics using online coaching. In the program, communication using text-based CMC with additional whiteboard capacity is used. Students range from sixth to ninth year of compulsory school, and upper secondary school (aged 12–19). Coaches are enrolled from students at teacher training colleges. Stenbom et al. (2012) introduced a framework for analyzing online coaching, the Relationship of Inquiry. That framework is a modification of the well-researched and verified theoretical framework the online Community of Inquiry (Garrison et al., 2000, 2001). Survey data and transcript analysis indicates that emotional presence is a natural part of a four-element framework for analysis of one-to-one online coaching. Abbreviations, special words and symbols, such as emoticons, are used regularly as an instrument to enhance the visibility between the coach and coachee. It serves as a replacement for face-to-face non-verbal communication. Also, sharing of emotions and moods between two individuals as people and about the coaching activity are common.

This presentation will review the proposed framework for online coaching consisting of cognitive, social, teaching and emotional presence. A special focus will be on the role emotion may play in such environments. Beyond discussion of theory, implications for practice and training of online coaches will be discussed in an interactive session with guided dialogue. 

National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-145844 (URN)
Conference
The Canadian Network for Innovation in Education Conference, May 13-16, 2014
Note

QC 20150218

Available from: 2014-06-02 Created: 2014-06-02 Last updated: 2015-02-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9984-6561

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