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Edfors, F., Forsström, B., Vunk, H., Kotol, D., Fredolini, C., Maddalo, G., . . . Uhlén, M. (2019). Screening a Resource of Recombinant Protein Fragments for Targeted Proteomics. Journal of Proteome Research, 18(7), 2706-2718
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Screening a Resource of Recombinant Protein Fragments for Targeted Proteomics
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 2706-2718Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The availability of proteomics resources hosting protein and peptide standards, as well as the data describing their analytical performances, will continue to enhance our current capabilities to develop targeted proteomics methods for quantitative biology. This study describes the analysis of a resource of 26,840 individually purified recombinant protein fragments corresponding to more than 16,000 human protein-coding genes. The resource was screened to identify proteotypic peptides suitable for targeted proteomics efforts, and we report LC-MS/MS assay coordinates for more than 25,000 proteotypic peptides, corresponding to more than 10,000 unique proteins. Additionally, peptide formation and digestion kinetics were, for a subset of the standards, monitored using a time-course protocol involving parallel digestion of isotope-labeled recombinant protein standards and endogenous human plasma proteins. We show that the strategy by adding isotope-labeled recombinant proteins before trypsin digestion enables short digestion protocols (<= 60 min) with robust quantitative precision. In a proof-of-concept study, we quantified 23 proteins in human plasma using assay parameters defined in our study and used the standards to describe distinct clusters of individuals linked to different levels of LPA, APOE, SERPINAS, and TFRC. In summary, we describe the use and utility of a resource of recombinant proteins to identify proteotypic peptides useful for targeted proteomics assay development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
Keywords
targeted proteomics, stable isotope standards, mass spectrometry, protein quantification, recombinant proteins, protein fragment, trypsin digestion, spectral library, assay generation, peptide formation
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255390 (URN)10.1021/acs.jproteome.8b00924 (DOI)000474795500003 ()31094526 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067403932 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190730

Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-07-30Bibliographically approved
Häussler, R. S., Bendes, A., Iglesias, M. J., Sanchez-Rivera, L., Dodig-Crnkovic, T., Byström, S., . . . Schwenk, J. M. (2019). Systematic Development of Sandwich Immunoassays for the Plasma Secretome. Proteomics, Article ID 1900008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic Development of Sandwich Immunoassays for the Plasma Secretome
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2019 (English)In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, article id 1900008Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The plasma proteome offers a clinically useful window into human health. Recent advances from highly multiplexed assays now call for appropriate pipelines to validate individual candidates. Here, a workflow is developed to build dual binder sandwich immunoassays (SIA) and for proteins predicted to be secreted into plasma. Utilizing suspension bead arrays, ≈1800 unique antibody pairs are first screened against 209 proteins with recombinant proteins as well as EDTA plasma. Employing 624 unique antibodies, dilution-dependent curves in plasma and concentration-dependent curves of full-length proteins for 102 (49%) of the targets are obtained. For 22 protein assays, the longitudinal, interindividual, and technical performance is determined in a set of plasma samples collected from 18 healthy subjects every third month over 1 year. Finally, 14 of these assays are compared with with SIAs composed of other binders, proximity extension assays, and affinity-free targeted mass spectrometry. The workflow provides a multiplexed approach to screen for SIA pairs that suggests using at least three antibodies per target. This design is applicable for a wider range of targets of the plasma proteome, and the assays can be applied for discovery but also to validate emerging candidates derived from other platforms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2019
Keywords
antibodies, plasma, sandwich assays, screening, secreted proteins
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255741 (URN)10.1002/pmic.201900008 (DOI)000477448900001 ()31278833 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069914143 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190812

Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
Edfors, F., Hober, A., Linderbäck, K., Maddalo, G., Azimi, A., Sivertsson, Å., . . . Uhlén, M. (2018). Enhanced validation of antibodies for research applications. Nature Communications, 9, Article ID 4130.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhanced validation of antibodies for research applications
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2018 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 4130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need for standardized validation methods for antibody specificity and selectivity. Recently, five alternative validation pillars were proposed to explore the specificity of research antibodies using methods with no need for prior knowledge about the protein target. Here, we show that these principles can be used in a streamlined manner for enhanced validation of research antibodies in Western blot applications. More than 6,000 antibodies were validated with at least one of these strategies involving orthogonal methods, genetic knockdown, recombinant expression, independent antibodies, and capture mass spectrometry analysis. The results show a path forward for efforts to validate antibodies in an application-specific manner suitable for both providers and users.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-237096 (URN)10.1038/s41467-018-06642-y (DOI)000446566000016 ()30297845 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054574300 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20181030

Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-10-30Bibliographically approved
Thul, P. J., Åkesson, L., Wiking, M., Mahdessian, D., Geladaki, A., Ait Blal, H., . . . Lundberg, E. (2017). A subcellular map of the human proteome. Science, 356(6340), Article ID 820.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A subcellular map of the human proteome
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2017 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 356, no 6340, article id 820Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Resolving the spatial distribution of the human proteome at a subcellular level can greatly increase our understanding of human biology and disease. Here we present a comprehensive image-based map of subcellular protein distribution, the Cell Atlas, built by integrating transcriptomics and antibody-based immunofluorescence microscopy with validation by mass spectrometry. Mapping the in situ localization of 12,003 human proteins at a single-cell level to 30 subcellular structures enabled the definition of the proteomes of 13 major organelles. Exploration of the proteomes revealed single-cell variations in abundance or spatial distribution and localization of about half of the proteins to multiple compartments. This subcellular map can be used to refine existing protein-protein interaction networks and provides an important resource to deconvolute the highly complex architecture of the human cell.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2017
Keywords
antibody, proteome, biology, cells and cell components, disease incidence, image analysis, physiological response, protein, proteomics, spatial distribution, Article, cell organelle, cellular distribution, human, human cell, immunofluorescence microscopy, mass spectrometry, priority journal, protein analysis, protein localization, protein protein interaction, single cell analysis, transcriptomics
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-216588 (URN)10.1126/science.aal3321 (DOI)000401957900032 ()2-s2.0-85019201137 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171208

Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, M., Edfors, F., Sivertsson, Å., Hallström, B. M., Hudson, E. P., Tegel, H., . . . Rockberg, J. (2015). Solid-phase cloning for high-throughput assembly of single and multiple DNA parts. Nucleic Acids Research, 43(7), Article ID e49.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Solid-phase cloning for high-throughput assembly of single and multiple DNA parts
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2015 (English)In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 43, no 7, article id e49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We describe solid-phase cloning (SPC) for high-throughput assembly of expression plasmids. Our method allows PCR products to be put directly into a liquid handler for capture and purification using paramagnetic streptavidin beads and conversion into constructs by subsequent cloning reactions. We present a robust automated protocol for restriction enzyme based SPC and its performance for the cloning of >60 000 unique human gene fragments into expression vectors. In addition, we report on SPC-based single-strand assembly for applications where exact control of the sequence between fragments is needed or where multiple inserts are to be assembled. In this approach, the solid support allows for head-to-tail assembly of DNA fragments based on hybridization and polymerase fill-in. The usefulness of head-to-tail SPC was demonstrated by assembly of >150 constructs with up to four DNA parts at an average success rate above 80%. We report on several applications for SPC and we suggest it to be particularly suitable for high-throughput efforts using laboratory workstations.

Keywords
PCR Products, Restriction Enzymes, Magnetic Beads, In-Vitro, One-Pot, Protein, Polymerase, Expression, Construction, Proteomics
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-159278 (URN)10.1093/nar/gkv036 (DOI)000354722500007 ()25618848 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84961523206 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceNovo NordiskKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationVINNOVA
Note

QC 20150203

Available from: 2015-01-28 Created: 2015-01-28 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Uhlén, M., Fagerberg, L., Hallström, B. M., Lindskog, C., Oksvold, P., Mardinoglu, A., . . . Pontén, F. (2015). Tissue-based map of the human proteome. Science, 347(6220), 1260419
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tissue-based map of the human proteome
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2015 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 347, no 6220, p. 1260419-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns, in all major tissues and organs in the human body.

Keywords
isoprotein, membrane protein, protein, proteome, tumor protein
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-160035 (URN)10.1126/science.1260419 (DOI)000348225800036 ()25613900 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84925582323 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20150216

Available from: 2015-02-13 Created: 2015-02-13 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Fagerberg, L., Oksvold, P., Skogs, M., Älgenäs, C., Lundberg, E., Pontén, F., . . . Uhlén, M. (2013). Contribution of antibody-based protein profiling to the human chromosome-centric proteome project (C-HPP). Journal of Proteome Research, 12(6), 2439-2448
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contribution of antibody-based protein profiling to the human chromosome-centric proteome project (C-HPP)
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 2439-2448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A gene-centric Human Proteome Project has been proposed to characterize the human protein-coding genes in a chromosome-centered manner to understand human biology and disease. Here, we report on the protein evidence for all genes predicted from the genome sequence based on manual annotation from literature (UniProt), antibody-based profiling in cells, tissues and organs and analysis of the transcript profiles using next generation sequencing in human cell lines of different origins. We estimate that there is good evidence for protein existence for 69% (n = 13985) of the human protein-coding genes, while 23% have only evidence on the RNA level and 7% still lack experimental evidence. Analysis of the expression patterns shows few tissue-specific proteins and approximately half of the genes expressed in all the analyzed cells. The status for each gene with regards to protein evidence is visualized in a chromosome-centric manner as part of a new version of the Human Protein Atlas (www.proteinatlas.org).

Keywords
Antibody-based protein profiling, C-HPP
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-134163 (URN)10.1021/pr300924j (DOI)000320298600010 ()23276153 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84879327718 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, FP7, Seventh Framework ProgrammeScience for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Note

QC 20131120

Available from: 2013-11-20 Created: 2013-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Tegel, H. (2013). Proteome wide protein production. (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proteome wide protein production
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Over a decade after the completion of the human genome, researchers around the world are still wondering what information is hidden in the genome. Although the sequences of all human genes are known, it is still almost impossible to determine much more than the primary protein structure from the coding sequence of a gene. As a result of that, the need for recombinantly produced proteins to study protein structure and function is greater than ever. The main objective of this thesis has been to improve protein production, particularly using Escherichia coli. To improve protein production in Escherichia coli there are a number of different parameters to consider. Two very important parameters in the process of protein production are transcription and translation. To study the influence of differences in transcription rate, target proteins with different characteristics were produced under control of three promoters of different strength (lacUV5, trc and T7). Analyzing the total amount of target protein as well as the amount of soluble protein demonstrated the benefits of using a strong promoter such as T7. However, protein production is also highly dependent on translational efficiency, and a drawback associated with the use of Escherichia coli as host strain is that codons rarely used in this host can have a negative effect on the translation. The influence of using a strain supplied with genes for rare codon tRNAs, such as Rosetta(DE3), instead of the standard host strain BL21(DE3), was therefore evaluated. By using Rosetta(DE3) an improved protein yield for many of the poorly produced proteins was achieved, but more importantly the protein purity was significantly increased for a majority of the proteins. For further understanding of the underlying causes of the positive effects of Rosetta(DE3), the improved purity was thoroughly studied. The cause of this improvement was explained by the fact that Rosetta(DE3) has a significantly better read through of the full sequence during translation and thereby less truncated versions of the full-length protein is formed.  Moreover, the effect of supplementation of rare tRNAs was shown to be highly dependent on the target gene sequence. Surprisingly, it was not the total number of rare codons that determined the benefit of using Rosetta(DE3), instead it was shown that rare arginine codons and to some extent also rare codon clusters had a much bigger impact on the final outcome.

As a result of the increased interest in large-scale studies in the field of proteomics, the need for high-throughput protein production pipelines is greater than ever. For that purpose, a protein production pipeline that allows handling of nearly 300 different proteins per week was set up within the Swedish Human Protein Atlas project. This was achieved by major and minor changes to the original protocol including protein production, purification and analysis. By using this standard setup almost 300 different proteins can be produced weekly, with an overall success rate of 81%. To further improve the success rate it has been shown that by adding an initial screening step, prior high-throughput protein production, unnecessary protein production can be avoided. A plate based micro-scale screening protocol for parallel production and verification of 96 proteins was developed. In that, protein production was performed using the EnBase® cultivation technology followed by purification based on immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. The protein products were finally verified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS. By using this method, proteins that will be poorly produced can be sorted out prior high-throughput protein production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2013. p. xiii, 67
Series
Trita-BIO-Report, ISSN 1654-2312 ; 2013:17
Keywords
protein production, Escherichia coli, transcription, promoter, translation, rare codon, high-throughput, screening
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-134215 (URN)978-91-7501-913-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-12-06, FR4, AlbaNova, Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20131120

Available from: 2013-11-20 Created: 2013-11-20 Last updated: 2013-11-20Bibliographically approved
Tegel, H., Ottosson, J. & Hober, S. (2011). Enhancing the protein production levels in Escherichia coli with a strong promoter. The FEBS Journal, 278(5), 729-739
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing the protein production levels in Escherichia coli with a strong promoter
2011 (English)In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 278, no 5, p. 729-739Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In biotechnology, the use of Escherichia coli for recombinant protein production has a long tradition, although the optimal production conditions for certain proteins are still not evident. The most favorable conditions for protein production vary with the gene product. Temperature and induction conditions represent parameters that affect total protein production, as well as the amount of soluble protein. Furthermore, the choice of promoter and bacterial strain will have large effects on the production of the target protein. In the present study, the effects of three different promoters (T7, trc and lacUV5) on E. coli production of target proteins with different characteristics are presented. The total amount of target protein as well as the amount of soluble protein were analyzed, demonstrating the benefits of using a strong promoter such as T7. To understand the underlying causes, transcription levels have been correlated with the total amount of target protein and protein solubility in vitro has been correlated with the amount of soluble protein that is produced. In addition, the effects of two different E. coli strains, BL21(DE3) and Rosetta(DE3), on the expression pattern were analyzed. It is concluded that the regulation of protein production is a combination of the transcription and translation efficiencies. Other important parameters include the nucleotide-sequence itself and the solubility of the target protein.

Keywords
Escherichia coli, promoter, protein production, transcription, translation
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-31353 (URN)10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07991.x (DOI)000287448800004 ()
Note
QC 20110317Available from: 2011-03-17 Created: 2011-03-14 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Tegel, H., Yderland, L., Boström, T., Eriksson, C., Ukkonen, K., Vasala, A., . . . Hober, S. (2011). Parallel production and verification of protein products using a novel high-throughput screening method. Biotechnology Journal, 6(8), 1018-1025
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parallel production and verification of protein products using a novel high-throughput screening method
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2011 (English)In: Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1860-6768, E-ISSN 1860-7314, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 1018-1025Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Protein production and analysis in a parallel fashion is today applied in laboratories worldwide and there is a great need to improve the techniques and systems used for this purpose. In order to save time and money, a fast and reliable screening method for analysis of protein production and also verification of the protein product is desired. Here, a micro-scale protocol for the parallel production and screening of 96 proteins in plate format is described. Protein capture was achieved using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the product was verified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS. In order to obtain sufficiently high cell densities and product yield in the small-volume cultivations, the EnBase (R) cultivation technology was applied, which enables cultivation in as small volumes as 150 mu L. Here, the efficiency of the method is demonstrated by producing 96 human, recombinant proteins, both in micro-scale and using a standard full-scale protocol and comparing the results in regard to both protein identity and sample purity. The results obtained are highly comparable to those acquired through employing standard full-scale purification protocols, thus validating this method as a successful initial screening step before protein production at a larger scale.

Keywords
His-tag, IMAC, Micro-scale, Protein production, Protein purification, Screening
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-39519 (URN)10.1002/biot.201000430 (DOI)000294108100012 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2011-09-20 Created: 2011-09-12 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7067-9173

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