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Hedberg, Yolanda, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2145-3650
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Publications (10 of 61) Show all publications
Hedberg, Y., Dobryden, I., Chaudhary, H., Wei, Z., Claesson, P. M. & Lendel, C. (2019). Synergistic effects of metal-induced aggregation of human serum albumin. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 173, 751-758
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synergistic effects of metal-induced aggregation of human serum albumin
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2019 (English)In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 173, p. 751-758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exposure to cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and nickel (Ni) occurs often via skin contact and from different dental and orthopedic implants. The metal ions bind to proteins, which may induce structural changes and aggregation, with different medical consequences. We investigated human serum albumin (HSA) aggregation in the presence of Co-II, Cr-III, and/or Ni-II ions and/or their nanoparticle precipitates by using scattering, spectroscopic, and imaging techniques, at simulated physiological conditions (phosphate buffered saline - PBS, pH 7.3) using metal salts that did not affect the pH, and at HSA:metal molar ratios of up to 1:8. Co ions formed some solid nano particles in PBS at the investigated conditions, as determined by nanoparticle tracking analysis, but the Cr-III anions and Ni-II ions remained fully soluble. It was found that all metal ions induced HSA aggregation, and this effect was significantly enhanced when a mixture of all three metal ions was present instead of any single type of ion. Thus, the metal ions induce aggregation synergistically. HSA aggregates formed linear structures on a mica surface in the presence of Cr-III ions. A clear tendency of aggregation and linearly aligned aggregates was seen in the presence of all three metal ions. Spectroscopic investigations indicated that the majority of the HSA molecules maintained their alpha helical secondary structure and conformation. This study highlights the importance of synergistic effects of metal ions and/or their precipitates on protein aggregation, which are highly relevant for implant materials and common exposures to metals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2019
Keywords
Cobalt, Chromium, Nickel, Binding, Albumin, Aggregation
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-241193 (URN)10.1016/j.colsurfb.2018.10.061 (DOI)000454377300089 ()30384272 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055579350 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190121

Available from: 2019-01-21 Created: 2019-01-21 Last updated: 2019-01-21Bibliographically approved
Wei, Z., Edin, J., Karlsson, A. E., Petrovic, K., Soroka, I. L., Odnevall Wallinder, I. & Hedberg, Y. (2018). Can gamma irradiation during radiotherapy influence the metal release process for biomedical CoCrMo and 316L alloys?. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, 106(7), 2673-2680
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can gamma irradiation during radiotherapy influence the metal release process for biomedical CoCrMo and 316L alloys?
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 106, no 7, p. 2673-2680Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The extent of metal release from implant materials that are irradiated during radiotherapy may be influenced by irradiation-formed radicals. The influence of gamma irradiation, with a total dose of relevance for radiotherapy (e.g., for cancer treatments) on the extent of metal release from biomedical stainless steel AISI 316L and a cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCrMo) was investigated in physiological relevant solutions (phosphate buffered saline with and without 10 g/L bovine serum albumin) at pH 7.3. Directly after irradiation, the released amounts of metals were significantly higher for irradiated CoCrMo as compared to nonirradiated CoCrMo, resulting in an increased surface passivation (enhanced passive conditions) that hindered further release. A similar effect was observed for 316L showing lower nickel release after 1 h of initially irradiated samples as compared to nonirradiated samples. However, the effect of irradiation (total dose of 16.5 Gy) on metal release and surface oxide composition and thickness was generally small. Most metals were released initially (within seconds) upon immersion from CoCrMo but not from 316L. Albumin induced an increased amount of released metals from AISI 316L but not from CoCrMo. Albumin was not found to aggregate to any greater extent either upon gamma irradiation or in the presence of trace metal ions, as determined using different light scattering techniques. Further studies should elucidate the effect of repeated friction and fractionated low irradiation doses on the short- and long term metal release process of biomedical materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2018
Keywords
BSA, implant, passivation, radicals, radiotherapy
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Corrosion Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225956 (URN)10.1002/jbm.b.34084 (DOI)000445449800017 ()29424962 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041712415 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015–04177Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS 15:353
Note

QC 20180611

Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved
Hedberg, Y., Erfani, B., Matura, M. & Lidén, C. (2018). Chromium(III) release from chromium-tanned leather elicits allergic contact dermatitis: a use test study.. Contact Dermatitis, 78(5), 307-314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chromium(III) release from chromium-tanned leather elicits allergic contact dermatitis: a use test study.
2018 (English)In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 307-314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Chromium (Cr) is a common skin sensitizer. The use of Cr(VI) in leather is restricted in the EU, but that of Cr(III) is not.

OBJECTIVES: To assess whether prolonged exposure to Cr-tanned leather with mainly Cr(III) release may elicit allergic contact dermatitis in Cr-allergic individuals.

METHOD: Ten Cr-allergic subjects and 22 controls were patch tested with serial dilutions of Cr(III) and Cr(VI), and with leather samples. They then conducted a use test with a Cr-tanned and a Cr-free leather bracelet over a period of 3 weeks, for 12 h per day. Cr deposited on the skin from the bracelets was measured in the controls, and the diphenylcarbazide test for Cr(VI) and extraction tests for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were conducted for the different leathers.

RESULTS: Four of 10 Cr-allergic subjects developed positive reactions to the Cr-tanned bracelet within 7-21 days, whereas only 1 of 10 had a positive patch test reaction to this leather. Cr released from the Cr-tanned leather was most probably entirely Cr(III), with a quantifiable amount being deposited on the skin.

CONCLUSIONS: This study strongly suggests that prolonged and repeated exposure to Cr-tanned leather with mainly Cr(III) release is capable of eliciting allergic contact dermatitis in Cr-allergic individuals.

Keywords
allergic contact dermatitis, chromium, leather, skin exposure assessment, use test
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225955 (URN)10.1111/cod.12946 (DOI)000428991800001 ()29322530 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040509202 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

QC 20180530

Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
Cappellini, F., Hedberg, Y., McCarrick, S., Hedberg, J., Derr, R., Hendriks, G., . . . Karlsson, H. L. (2018). Mechanistic insight into reactivity and (geno)toxicity of well-characterized nanoparticles of cobalt metal and oxides. Nanotoxicology, 12(6), 602-620
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanistic insight into reactivity and (geno)toxicity of well-characterized nanoparticles of cobalt metal and oxides
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2018 (English)In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 602-620Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing use of cobalt (Co)-based nanoparticles (NPs) in different applications and exposures at occupational settings triggers the need for toxicity assessment. Improved understanding regarding the physiochemical characteristics of Co metal NPs and different oxides in combination with assessment of toxicity and mechanisms may facilitate decisions for grouping during risk assessment. The aim of this study was to gain mechanistic insights in the correlation between NP reactivity and toxicity of three different Co-based NPs (Co, CoO, and Co3O4) by using various tools for characterization, traditional toxicity assays, as well as six reporter cell lines (ToxTracker) for rapid detection of signaling pathways of relevance for carcinogenicity. The results showed cellular uptake of all NPs in lung cells and induction of DNA strand breaks and oxidative damage (comet assay) by Co and CoO NPs. In-depth studies on the ROS generation showed high reactivity of Co, lower for CoO, and no reactivity of Co3O4 NPs. The reactivity depended on the corrosion and transformation/dissolution properties of the particles and the media highlighting the role of the surface oxide and metal speciation as also confirmed by in silico modeling. By using ToxTracker, Co NPs were shown to be highly cytotoxic and induced reporters related to oxidative stress (Nrf2 signaling) and DNA strand breaks. Similar effects were observed for CoO NPs but at higher concentrations, whereas the Co3O4 NPs were inactive at all concentrations tested. In conclusion, our study suggests that Co and CoO NPs, but not Co3O4, may be grouped together for risk assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Cobalt, nanomaterials, genotoxicity, risk assessment, grouping
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240194 (URN)10.1080/17435390.2018.1470694 (DOI)000439981600008 ()29790399 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047266606 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-4598 2015-04177 2013-5621 2017-03931
Note

QC 20181214

Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Hedberg, Y., Uter, W., Banerjee, P., Lind, M.-L., Steengaard, S. S., Teo, Y. & Liden, C. (2018). Non-oxidative hair dye products on the European market: What do they contain?. Contact Dermatitis, 79(5), 281-287
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-oxidative hair dye products on the European market: What do they contain?
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2018 (English)In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 281-287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hair dyeing is very common and may cause allergic contact dermatitis. Oxidative (often termed permanent or semi-permanent) hair dye products have constituted the focus of market surveys and toxicological risk assessments, while non-oxidative (semi-permanent, temporary or direct) products have not been assessed. Objectives: To identify the hair dye substances presently used in non-oxidative hair dye products in Europe. Methods: Ingredient label data on eligible products in 5 European countries were collected, and 289 different non-oxidative hair dye products were included in this study. Results: Up to 9 hair dye substances were present in each product. Sixty-eight individual hair dye substances were identified on the 289 product labels, and their occurrence ranged from 0.3% to 34%. There were differences concerning substances used and their number per product between products of different consistency and colour. Conclusions: The hair dye substances in non-oxidative hair dye products are different from those in oxidative hair dye products, and are currently not covered by patch test series. The toxicological and skin-sensitizing profile of the substances in non-oxidative hair dye products, as well as their concentrations, should be further investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2018
Keywords
consumer products, cosmetics, exposure analysis, hair dyes, ingredient label, market survey, non-permanent, temporary
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-237087 (URN)10.1111/cod.13074 (DOI)000446074000004 ()30028011 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050624419 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20181024

Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
Hedberg, Y., Uter, W., Banerjee, P., Lind, M.-L. -., Skovvang Steengaard, S., Teo, Y. & Lidén, C. (2018). Non-oxidative hair dye products on the European market: What do they contain?. Contact Dermatitis, 79(5), 281-287
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-oxidative hair dye products on the European market: What do they contain?
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2018 (English)In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 281-287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hair dyeing is very common and may cause allergic contact dermatitis. Oxidative (often termed permanent or semi-permanent) hair dye products have constituted the focus of market surveys and toxicological risk assessments, while non-oxidative (semi-permanent, temporary or direct) products have not been assessed. Objectives: To identify the hair dye substances presently used in non-oxidative hair dye products in Europe. Methods: Ingredient label data on eligible products in 5 European countries were collected, and 289 different non-oxidative hair dye products were included in this study. Results: Up to 9 hair dye substances were present in each product. Sixty-eight individual hair dye substances were identified on the 289 product labels, and their occurrence ranged from 0.3% to 34%. There were differences concerning substances used and their number per product between products of different consistency and colour. Conclusions: The hair dye substances in non-oxidative hair dye products are different from those in oxidative hair dye products, and are currently not covered by patch test series. The toxicological and skin-sensitizing profile of the substances in non-oxidative hair dye products, as well as their concentrations, should be further investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
Keywords
consumer products, cosmetics, exposure analysis, hair dyes, ingredient label, market survey, non-permanent, temporary
National Category
Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236347 (URN)10.1111/cod.13074 (DOI)000446074000004 ()2-s2.0-85050624419 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20181108

Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2018-11-08Bibliographically approved
Yan, H., Chircov, C., Zhong, X., Winkeljann, B., Dobryden, I., Nilsson, H. E., . . . Crouzier, T. (2018). Reversible Condensation of Mucins into Nanoparticles. Langmuir, 34(45), 13615-13625
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reversible Condensation of Mucins into Nanoparticles
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2018 (English)In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 45, p. 13615-13625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mucins are high molar mass glycoproteins that assume an extended conformation and can assemble into mucus hydrogels that protect our mucosal epithelium. In nature, the challenging task of generating a mucus layer, several hundreds of micrometers in thickness, from micrometer-sized cells is elegantly solved by the condensation of mucins inside vesicles and their on-demand release from the cells where they suddenly expand to form the extracellular mucus hydrogel. We aimed to recreate and control the process of compaction for mucins, the first step toward a better understanding of the process and creating biomimetic in vivo delivery strategies of macromolecules. We found that by adding glycerol to the aqueous solvent, we could induce drastic condensation of purified mucin molecules, reducing their size by an order of magnitude down to tens of nanometers in diameter. The condensation effect of glycerol was fully reversible and could be further enhanced and partially stabilized by cationic cross-linkers such as calcium and polylysine. The change of structure of mucins from extended molecules to nano-sized particles in the presence of glycerol translated into macroscopic rheological changes, as illustrated by a dampened shear-thinning effect with increasing glycerol concentration. This work provides new insight into mucin condensation, which could lead to new delivery strategies mimicking cell release of macromolecules condensed in vesicles such as mucins and heparin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2018
National Category
Nano Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239774 (URN)10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b02190 (DOI)000450695000018 ()30350704 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056360596 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190109

Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Lebedova, J., Hedberg, Y., Odnevall Wallinder, I. & Karlsson, H. L. (2018). Size-dependent genotoxicity of silver, gold and platinum nanoparticles studied using the mini-gel comet assay and micronucleus scoring with flow cytometry. Mutagenesis, 33(1), 77-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Size-dependent genotoxicity of silver, gold and platinum nanoparticles studied using the mini-gel comet assay and micronucleus scoring with flow cytometry
2018 (English)In: Mutagenesis, ISSN 0267-8357, E-ISSN 1464-3804, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) are promising nanomaterials used in different technological solutions as well as in consumer products. Silver (Ag), gold (Au) and platinum (Pt) represent three metallic NPs with current or suggested use in different applications. Pt is also used as vehicle exhaust catalyst leading to a possible exposure via inhalation. Despite their use, there is limited data on their genotoxic potential and possible size-dependent effects, particularly for Pt NPs. The aim of this study was to explore size-dependent genotoxicity of these NPs (5 and 50 nm) following exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells. We characterised the NPs and assessed the viability (Alamar blue assay), formation of DNA strand breaks (mini-gel comet assay) and induction of micronucleus (MN) analysed using flow cytometry (in vitro microflow kit). The results confirmed the primary size (5 and 50 nm) but showed agglomeration of all NPs in the serum free medium used. Slight reduced cell viability (tested up to 50 mu g/ml) was observed following exposure to the Ag NPs of both particle sizes as well as to the smallest (5 nm) Au NPs. Similarly, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, both 5 and 50 nm-sized Ag NPs, as well as 5 nm-sized Au NPs, increased DNA strand breaks whereas for Pt NPs only the 50 nm size caused a slight increase in DNA damage. No clear induction of MN was observed in any of the doses tested (up to 20 mu g/ml). Taken together, by using the comet assay our study shows DNA strand breaks induced by Ag NPs, without any obvious differences in size, whereas effects from Au and Pt NPs were size-dependent in the sense that the 5 nm-sized Au NPs and 50 nm-sized Pt NPs particles were active. No clear induction of MN was observed for the NPs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2018
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225329 (URN)10.1093/mutage/gex027 (DOI)000426079100011 ()2-s2.0-85042721477 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180403

Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Mei, N., Belleville, L., Cha, Y., Olofsson, U., Odnevall Wallinder, I., Persson, K.-A. -. & Hedberg, Y. (2018). Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles – A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 342, 527-535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles – A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 342, p. 527-535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Welding fume of stainless steels is potentially health hazardous. The aim of this study was to investigate the manganese (Mn) and chromium (Cr) speciation of welding fume particles and their extent of metal release relevant for an inhalation scenario, as a function of particle size, welding method (manual metal arc welding, metal arc welding using an active shielding gas), different electrodes (solid wires and flux-cored wires) and shielding gases, and base alloy (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex stainless steel LDX2101). Metal release investigations were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.3, 37°, 24 h. The particles were characterized by means of microscopic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical methods. Cr was predominantly released from particles of the welding fume when exposed in PBS [3–96% of the total amount of Cr, of which up to 70% as Cr(VI)], followed by Mn, nickel, and iron. Duplex stainless steel welded with a flux-cored wire generated a welding fume that released most Cr(VI). Nano-sized particles released a significantly higher amount of nickel compared with micron-sized particle fractions. The welding fume did not contain any solitary known chromate compounds, but multi-elemental highly oxidized oxide(s) (iron, Cr, and Mn, possibly bismuth and silicon). 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Chromium(VI), Flux-cored wire, Manganese, Nickel, Welding
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-216800 (URN)10.1016/j.jhazmat.2017.08.070 (DOI)000414880800057 ()28886565 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028707249 (Scopus ID)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2017-02519
Note

QC 20171205

Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Hedberg, Y., Karlsson, M.-E. -., Wei, Z., Znidarsic, M., Odnevall Wallinder, I. & Hedberg, J. (2017). Interaction of Albumin and Fibrinogen with Stainless Steel: Influence of Sequential Exposure and Protein Aggregation on Metal Release and Corrosion Resistance. Corrosion, 73(12)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction of Albumin and Fibrinogen with Stainless Steel: Influence of Sequential Exposure and Protein Aggregation on Metal Release and Corrosion Resistance
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2017 (English)In: Corrosion, ISSN 0010-9312, E-ISSN 1938-159X, Vol. 73, no 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Corrosion and metal release mechanisms of the biomedical stainless steel grade Type 316L are at human-relevant biological conditions not fully understood. This study focuses on its corrosion properties and release of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) into simulated physiological solutions at pH 7.4 in the presence of proteins. Parallel studies were performed on stainless steel Type 303 containing a substantial amount of MnS inclusions. Metal release studies were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 4 h and 24 h at 37 degrees C with or without different concentrations of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibrinogen from bovine plasma (Fbn), or mixtures of the same. Studies were in addition performed after 1, 4, 6, and 24 h in solutions that were partially replenished after 5 h in order to investigate whether any Vroman effect (exchange of adsorbed proteins by proteins of higher binding affinity) could influence the extent of released metals in solution. This was performed at physiological concentrations of BSA (40 g/L) and Fbn (2.67 g/L) in PBS, and for reference solutions of PBS, PBS with 40 g/L BSA, and PBS with 2.67 g/L Fbn. Changes in open-circuit potential and linear polarization resistance were investigated for the same conditions. After exposure, the exposed surfaces were rinsed and investigated ex situ by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. Metal-protein complexation-induced metal release mechanisms were found to be most pronounced for Type 316L and the release of Fe, Cr, and Ni. Fibrinogen adsorbed differently onto Type 303 (thicker conformation of adsorbed proteins) as compared with Type 316L and occasionally induced corrosion events for Type 303. Mn was mostly released from inclusions present in the Type 303 alloy, most probably via non-electrochemical mechanisms. A Vroman effect was observed for both grades. A significant extent of precipitation of metal-rich protein aggregates influenced the metal release measurements in solution and resulted in an underestimation of the total amount of released metals from the stainless steel grades.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATL ASSOC CORROSION ENG, 2017
Keywords
albumin, corrosion resistance, fibrinogen, metal release, Vroman
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-217929 (URN)10.5006/2504 (DOI)000414329600005 ()
Note

QC 20171121

Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2145-3650

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