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Publications (10 of 111) Show all publications
Selvakkumaran, S. & Silveira, S. (2019). Exploring synergies between the intended nationally determined contributions and electrification goals of Ethiopia, Kenya and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Climate and Development, 11(5), 401-417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring synergies between the intended nationally determined contributions and electrification goals of Ethiopia, Kenya and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)
2019 (English)In: Climate and Development, ISSN 1756-5529, E-ISSN 1756-5537, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 401-417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of the study is to assess the linkages between climate-related measures and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Ethiopia, Kenya and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) within the scope of submitted Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC). Given the under-reporting of least developed countries' and emerging economies' issues with regards to climate change mitigation and adaptation, this study is important in studying how these three countries are integrating electrification goals (SDG7) with their INDC. The analysis explores the electricity mix, the expected greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation until 2030, and electrification and related metrics. The INDCs provide a platform to achieve universalization of electrification, catalysing climate finance. Given the bottom-up process inherent to the current climate agreement mechanism, the paper gives insights on how these countries have used the INDC to prioritize sustainable electricity access. The results show that the countries have different storylines as to their electricity access targets and INDC. Ethiopia aims at nearly 100% renewables for power, while Kenya only generates 54% of the total electricity with renewables in 2030. In the DRC, the percentage of renewables is very high, but the per capita electricity consumption remains low while the country becomes a power exporter. The three countries have set a target of 75% electricity access in 2030, but only Kenya comes halfway to the minimum of 2000 kWh/capita of economy-wide electricity generation, which is required for a reasonable level of welfare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
Keywords
electricity access, INDCs, GHG emissions, sub-Saharan Africa, renewables
National Category
Renewable Bioenergy Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255219 (URN)10.1080/17565529.2018.1442800 (DOI)000472111300002 ()2-s2.0-85042946470 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190903

Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-09-03Bibliographically approved
Xylia, M., Leduc, S., Laurent, A.-B., Patrizio, P., van der Meer, Y., Kraxner, F. & Silveira, S. (2019). Impact of bus electrification on carbon emissions: The case of Stockholm. Journal of Cleaner Production, 209, 74-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of bus electrification on carbon emissions: The case of Stockholm
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 209, p. 74-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on the potential impact of various options for decarbonization of public bus transport in Stockholm, with particular attention to electrification. An optimization model is used to locate electric bus chargers and to estimate the associated carbon emissions, using a life cycle perspective and various implementation scenarios. Emissions associated with fuels and batteries of electric powertrains are considered to be the two main factors affecting carbon emissions. The results show that, although higher battery capacities could help electrify more routes of the city's bus network, this does not necessarily lead to a reduction of the total emissions. The results show the lowest life cycle emissions occurring when electric buses use batteries with a capacity of 120 kWh. The fuel choices significantly influence the environmental impact of a bus network. For example, the use of electricity is a better choice than first generation biofuels from a carbon emission perspective. However, the use of second -generation biofuels, such as Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil (HVO), can directly compete with the Nordic electricity mix. Among all fuel options, certified renewable electricity has the lowest impact. The analysis also shows that electrification could be beneficial for reduction of local pollutants in the Stockholm inner city; however, the local emissions of public transport are much lower than emissions from private transport.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-244097 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.10.085 (DOI)000457351900008 ()2-s2.0-85056180054 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 39254-1
Note

QC 20190219

Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Harahap, F., Leduc, S., Sennai, M., Khatiwada, D., Kraxner, F. & Silveira, S. (2019). Opportunities to Optimize the Palm Oil Supply Chain in Sumatra, Indonesia. Energies, 12(3), Article ID 420.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities to Optimize the Palm Oil Supply Chain in Sumatra, Indonesia
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2019 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 420Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Significant amounts of biomass residues were generated in Indonesia. While untreated, residues emit greenhouse gases during the decomposition process. On the other hand, if efficiently utilized, these residues could be used to produce value-added products. This study investigates opportunities for harnessing the full potential of palm oil residues (i.e., empty fruit bunches, kernel shells, fiber, and mill effluent). As far as we are aware, the study is the first attempt to model the palm oil supply chain in a geographically explicit way while considering regional infrastructures in Sumatra Island, Indonesia. The BeWhere model, a mixed integer linear programming model for energy system optimization, was used to assess the costs and benefits of optimizing the regional palm oil supply chain. Different scenarios were investigated, considering current policies and new practices leading to improved yields in small-scale plantations and power grid connectivity. The study shows that a more efficient palm oil supply chain can pave the way for the country to meet up to 50% of its national bioenergy targets by 2025, and emission reductions of up to 40 MtCO2eq/year. As much as 50% of the electricity demand in Sumatra could be met if residues are efficiently used and grid connections are available. We recommend that system improvements be done in stages. In the short to medium term, improving the smallholder plantation yield is the most optimal way to maximize regional economic gains from the palm oil industry. In the medium to long term, improving electricity grid connection to palm oil mills could bring higher economic value as excess electricity is commercialized.

National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Energy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-242226 (URN)10.3390/en12030420 (DOI)000460666200088 ()2-s2.0-85060947078 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, T6473
Note

QC 20190130

Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved
Harahap, F., Leduc, S., Mesfun, S., Kraxner, F. & Silveira, S. (2019). The role of oil palm biomass to meet liquid biofuels target in Indonesia. In: Wojciech Stanek, Paweł Gładysz, Sebastian Werle, Wojciech Adamczyk (Ed.), Proceedings of the 32nd International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems: . Paper presented at 32nd International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, June 23-28, 2019, Wroclaw, Poland. Poland
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of oil palm biomass to meet liquid biofuels target in Indonesia
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 32nd International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems / [ed] Wojciech Stanek, Paweł Gładysz, Sebastian Werle, Wojciech Adamczyk, Poland, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Indonesia aims at reducing the dependence on oil import by liquid biofuels consumption (i.e., biodiesel and bio-ethanol) in industry, transport and power sectors. The palm oil industry has played significant role in the development of biodiesel in the country producing crude palm oil (CPO) and palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) based biodiesel. Opportunity exists for the industry to contribute to the development of bio-ethanol program by utilising the lignocellulosic biomass such as the empty fruit bunches (EFB). This study evaluates the potential of liquid biofuels production from oil palm biomass and the domestic demand for biofuels as per biofuel blending target set by the Indonesian government. The existing infrastructures as well as the investment opportunity of each type of biofuel are analyzed. While technology for biodiesel production is proven at large scale, the bio-ethanol production from EFB is not commercialized yet. The study shows that meeting the biodiesel blending target is at risk if Indonesia continues to solely reliance on the production of CPO and PFAD based biodiesel. Palm oil industry can produce nearly 7 billion litres biodiesel from CPO and PFAD in 2025 but the biodiesel domestic demand is 30% higher. The bio-ethanol program faces higher risk. EFB based ethanol through gasification and synthesis of alcohol can contribute to around 13% of the target in 2025, however the infrastructure is not ready yet. Feedstock diversification to produce liquid biofuels should be prioritized. We recommend a review of the current plan to a more achievable targets or prolong the timeline in order to secure domestic biofuels demand while continuing export. The study provides database for future modelling exercise on multi-period optimization study of palm biofuels supply chain in Indonesia in a geographically explicit way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Poland: , 2019
Keywords
Oil palm biomass; liquid biofuels; biofuel blending target; palm oil supply chain, Indonesia
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Energy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-256541 (URN)978-83-61506-51-5 (ISBN)
Conference
32nd International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, June 23-28, 2019, Wroclaw, Poland
Note

QC 20190903

Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-09-03Bibliographically approved
Barragán-Beaud, C., Pizarro-Alonso, A., Xylia, M., Syri, S. & Silveira, S. (2018). Carbon tax or emissions trading?: An analysis of economic and political feasibility of policy mechanisms for greenhouse gas emissions reduction in the Mexican power sector. Energy Policy, 122, 287-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon tax or emissions trading?: An analysis of economic and political feasibility of policy mechanisms for greenhouse gas emissions reduction in the Mexican power sector
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2018 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 122, p. 287-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study provides a comparative assessment of carbon-pricing instruments for the Mexican electricity sector, contrasting a carbon tax with an emissions trading scheme (ETS). The assessment is performed in terms of economic impacts and political feasibility. Model-based scenarios considering different price and quantity levels are analyzed on Balmorel-MX, a cost optimization bottom-up model of the Mexican electricity system. The political feasibility is evaluated using an online survey and interviews with representatives of relevant stakeholder groups. The assessment suggests that an ETS is the most appropriate instrument for the Mexican case. We recommend to set the cap as 31% abatement in relation to a baseline, which is suggested to be 102 MtCO2 by 2030, given the business-as-usual baseline used as reference by the Mexican government (202 MtCO2) is found to leave cost-effective abatement potential untapped. An emission trading system with such design has higher cost-efficiency and lower distributional effects than a carbon tax at equivalent ambition level (15 USD/tCO2). The political feasibility analysis confirms the assessment, as it is in line with the priorities of the stakeholder groups, allows earmarking carbon revenue and avoids exempting natural gas from carbon pricing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Carbon pricing, Climate policy, Electricity sector, Energy systems analysis, Mexico, Political feasibility, Carbon, Commerce, Cost effectiveness, Economic analysis, Electric industry, Emission control, Gas emissions, Greenhouse gases, Systems analysis, Me-xico, Costs, carbon emission, electricity industry, emissions trading, energy market, environmental policy, feasibility study, greenhouse gas, political economy, pollution tax, Mexico [North America]
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236612 (URN)10.1016/j.enpol.2018.07.010 (DOI)000447576700027 ()2-s2.0-85050804343 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 22 October 2018; Article; CODEN: ENPYA; Correspondence Address: Pizarro-Alonso, A.; Energy Systems Analysis, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of DenmarkDenmark; email: aroal@dtu.dk; Funding text: This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. Authors would like to thank the Partnership Program between Denmark and Mexico for Energy and Climate Change, the Danish Energy Agency and EA Energy Analyses for introducing the Balmorel model in Mexico. In addition, authors would also like to thank Hans Ravn for the comments regarding Balmorel, and Samuel Cross for his guidance in the initial phases of this research. The authors would like to thank the anonymous reviewers for the valuable feedback provided. Appendix A. QC 20181119

Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved
Mainali, B., Luukkanen, J., Silveira, S. & Kaivo-Oja, J. (2018). Evaluating synergies and trade-offs among Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): Explorative analyses of development paths in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Sustainability, 10(3), Article ID 815.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating synergies and trade-offs among Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): Explorative analyses of development paths in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 815Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the linkages between multiple targets of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) may help to integrate different sectoral programmes and develop coherent cross-sectoral policy to explore synergies. Synergy is interaction among two or more actions, which will lead to an impact greater or less than the sum of individual effects. Therefore, synergy can be positive or negative (trade-off). This paper aims at developing an analytical framework to evaluate sectoral linkages and examine potential synergies and trade-offs among various SDGs' goals and targets. Synergies and trade-offs related to energy access (SDG7), clean water and sanitation access (SDG6), food security and sustainable agriculture (SDG2) and poverty alleviation (SDG1) have been evaluated from the perspective of developing countries using examples from South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka) and Sub-Saharan Africa (Ghana, Ethiopia and Rwanda), and historical data for the period between 1990 and 2012. The analytical framework includes both qualitative and quantitative methods. Network analysis technique has been used for exploring the conceptual linkage among different indicators, and capturing the targets associated with SDGs. Advanced Sustainability Analysis (ASA) developed under the European framework programme has been used for quantifying the synergies and trade-offs among sustainability indicators. The analysis showed strong synergy among various SDG targets. Interestingly, the potential synergy differs from country to country and over time. Ghana and Sri Lanka had relatively higher potential synergy, whereas Rwanda and Nepal had relatively lower potential synergy among the various targets. Higher synergy values were evidenced in those cases where the policy have recognized and emphasized on linkages among cross-sectoral targets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2018
Keywords
South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Sustainable development goals, Synergies, Trade-off
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-224814 (URN)10.3390/su10030815 (DOI)000428567100242 ()2-s2.0-85044005994 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180327

Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
Khatiwada, D., Palmén, C. & Silveira, S. (2018). Evaluating the palm oil demand in Indonesia: Production trends, yields, and emerging issues. Biofuels
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the palm oil demand in Indonesia: Production trends, yields, and emerging issues
2018 (English)In: Biofuels, ISSN 1759-7269, E-ISSN 1759-7277Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates the development of domestic and international demand for Indonesian palm oil, in line with national biofuel mandates and established export markets. Domestic demand for palm oil for (i) achieving biodiesel targets and (ii) meeting food and industrial uses reaches 20 million tonnes by 2025, equivalent to 61% of Indonesian production in 2014. Thus, it is possible for Indonesia to be self-sufficient, reaching the biodiesel targets without increasing plantation areas. However, to meet both domestic and international demand, a total 51 million tonnes of crude palm oil will be needed in 2025. This requires additional land up to 6 million hectares with current yields. The expansion of oil palm plantations in Indonesia has led to debates related to deforestation, threatened biodiversity, and greenhouse gas emissions. We show that increasing agricultural yields could serve the purpose, benefiting biodiesel production while reducing the need for new land. Therefore, we recommend that the ambitious Indonesian biodiesel mandates are pursued in combination with a strategy for increased productivity in palm oil production, utilization of degraded land to contain greenhouse gas emissions, and use of palm oil biomass residues for energy production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Biodiesel, Palm Oil, Yields, Land Use, Biofuel Policy, Indonesia
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-224787 (URN)10.1080/17597269.2018.1461520 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046479453 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20190123

Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Mainali, B., Ahmed, H. & Silveira, S. (2018). Integrated approach for provision of clean energy and water in rural Bangladesh. Groundwater for Sustainable Development, 7, 239-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated approach for provision of clean energy and water in rural Bangladesh
2018 (English)In: Groundwater for Sustainable Development, ISSN 2352-801X, Vol. 7, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ultimate goal of this paper is to explore ways to upgrade energy and water services in rural areas of Bangladesh while improving resource recovery. The study analyzes the potential of a poly-generation system using locally available biomass resources (cow dung and agriculture residue) for providing cooking energy, electricity, and drinking water to a rural community. A questionnaire survey was conducted in Pani Para village with 52 households to investigate demand patterns and estimate the resource potential and amount of biogas needed in the poly-generation system. A poly-generation system with 150 m3 biogas digester and a 10 kWe generator is required to meet cooking energy, electricity and water demand in the village. Co-digestion of available resources including cow dung and agriculture residues can provide 48,250 m3 biogas/year, which is sufficient to supply electricity and clean drinking water to all households in the village. In addition, around two thirds of the households can use biogas for cooking. The sensitivity analysis shows that if the amount of agriculture residues is increased by 15%, also cooking gas can be provided to all households. The results indicate that such integrated solutions are worth further exploration. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2018
Keywords
Biogas, Cooking fuel, Electricity, Poly-generation, Water
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236705 (URN)10.1016/j.gsd.2018.06.009 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049301325 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 22 October 2018; Article; Correspondence Address: Mainali, B.; Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology, Linnaeus UniversitySweden; email: brijesh.mainali@lnu.se; Funding details: Sida, Styrelsen för Internationellt Utvecklingssamarbete; Funding text: This paper was written in the scope of the research project (Project No. SWE-2011-135 ) at KTH and funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency . We would like to thank Grameen Shakti in Bangladesh and Scarab Development AB in Sweden, for their partnership in the project. We would also like to thank Nasrin Akter for support during field study. QC 20181029

Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Dreier, D., Silveira, S., Khatiwada, D., Fonseca, K. V. O., Nieweglowski, R. & Schepanski, R. (2018). The influence of passenger load, driving cycle, fuel price and different types of buses on the cost of transport service in the BRT system in Curitiba, Brazil. Transportation, 1-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of passenger load, driving cycle, fuel price and different types of buses on the cost of transport service in the BRT system in Curitiba, Brazil
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2018 (English)In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, p. 1-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study analyses the influence of passenger load, driving cycle, fuel price and four different types of buses on the cost of transport service for one bus rapid transit (BRT) route in Curitiba, Brazil. First, the energy use is estimated for different passenger loads and driving cycles for a conventional bi-articulated bus (ConvBi), a hybrid-electric two-axle bus (HybTw), a hybrid-electric articulated bus (HybAr) and a plug-in hybrid-electric two-axle bus (PlugTw). Then, the fuel cost and uncertainty are estimated considering the fuel price trends in the past. Based on this and additional cost data, replacement scenarios for the currently operated ConvBi fleet are determined using a techno-economic optimisation model. The lowest fuel cost ranges for the passenger load are estimated for PlugTw amounting to (0.198–0.289) USD/km, followed by (0.255–0.315) USD/km for HybTw, (0.298–0.375) USD/km for HybAr and (0.552–0.809) USD/km for ConvBi. In contrast, the coefficient of variation (Cv'>C v  Cv) of the combined standard uncertainty is the highest for PlugTw (Cv'>C v  Cv: 15–17%) due to stronger sensitivity to varying bus driver behaviour, whereas it is the least for ConvBi (Cv'>C v  Cv: 8%). The scenario analysis shows that a complete replacement of the ConvBi fleet leads to considerable higher cost of transport service on the BRT route, amounting to an increase by 64% to 139%, depending on the bus fleet composition. Meanwhile, the service quality is improved resulting in 42% up to 64% less waiting time for passengers at a bus stop.

Keywords
Bi-articulated, Driving pattern, Fuel consumption, Optimization, Ridership, Service quality
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246190 (URN)10.1007/s11116-018-9925-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-85053835267 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova
Note

QC 20190318

Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-03-18Bibliographically approved
Xylia, M. & Silveira, S. (2018). The role of charging technologies in upscaling the use of electric buses in public transport: Experiences from demonstration projects. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 118, 399-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of charging technologies in upscaling the use of electric buses in public transport: Experiences from demonstration projects
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 118, p. 399-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Electrification of public bus transport services is currently being explored in various demonstration projects around the world. The objective of this paper is to (i) gather insights from electric bus demonstration projects with a focus on charging technologies (conductive, inductive) and strategies (slow, fast); and explore the role these factors may play as upscaling of electric bus deployment is considered. The focus is on the Nordic region. A survey with stakeholders involved with electric bus demonstration projects is performed for understanding the benefits and drawbacks of each solution, and identifying the main themes emerging from project implementation and upscaling. Advantages of the conductive charging include the maturity of the technology and its higher maximum charging power compared to currently available inductive alternatives. On the other hand, inductive technology entails other benefits, such as the lack of moving parts which could reduce the maintenance costs for infrastructure, as well as minimal visibility of the equipment. The main issues likely to impact the upscaling of electric bus use are related to the maturity, cost-effectiveness, compatibility, and charging efficiency of the available technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Charging infrastructure, Charging technology, Electric bus, Public transport, Survey, Thematic analysis, Buses, Cost effectiveness, Demonstrations, Electric automobiles, Surveying, Surveys, Charging efficiency, Charging infrastructures, Conductive charging, Demonstration project, Project implementation, Bus transportation
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236561 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2018.09.011 (DOI)000452941000027 ()2-s2.0-85054178236 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy AgencyVattenfall AB
Note

QC 20181127

Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2019-01-03Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7123-1824

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