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Publications (10 of 130) Show all publications
Yang, L., Lu, K., Abtahi, F., Lindecrantz, K., Seoane, F., Forsman, M. & Eklund, J. (2017). A pilot study of using smart clothes for physicalworkload assessment. In: JOY AT WORK: . Paper presented at Conference Proceedings of Nordic Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Conference (pp. 169-170). Lund, Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A pilot study of using smart clothes for physicalworkload assessment
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2017 (English)In: JOY AT WORK, Lund, Sweden, 2017, p. 169-170Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund, Sweden: , 2017
Keywords
Energy expenditure estimation, pulmonary ventilation, heart rate.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-227864 (URN)978-91-7753-152-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Conference Proceedings of Nordic Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Conference
Note

QC 20180614

Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Rolfö, L., Eliasson, K. & Eklund, J. (2017). An activity-based flex office: Planning processes and outcomes. In: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists: 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management. Paper presented at ACE-ODAM; Banff, Alberta, Canada, July 31-August 3, 2017 (pp. 330-338). Banff, Alberta, Canada
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An activity-based flex office: Planning processes and outcomes
2017 (English)In: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists: 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management, Banff, Alberta, Canada, 2017, p. 330-338Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This longitudinal case study addresses activities used in the planning process of a new activity based flex office (A-FO), and addresses results after the relocation. The results show that several activities were used to involve employees in the planning process. Employee satisfaction and perceived performance were rated in more positive terms after the relocation than before. The company’s process can be considered as a good example of planning and design processes.

Abstract [fr]

Cette étude de cas longitudinale porte sur les activités utilisées dans le processus de planification d'un nouveau bureau flexible basé sur les 'activités et aborde les résultats après le déménagement. Les résultats montrent que plusieurs activités ont été utilisées pour faire participer les employés au processus de planification. La satisfaction des employés et le rendement perçu ont été évalués comme étant plus positifs après le déménagement qu’avant ce dernier. On peut dire que le processus de l'entreprise reflète un bon exemple de planification et de processus de conception.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Banff, Alberta, Canada: , 2017
Keywords
Activity-based office, design, employee involvement, satisfaction, perceived performance.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-213024 (URN)
Conference
ACE-ODAM; Banff, Alberta, Canada, July 31-August 3, 2017
Projects
Projektering och planering av nya arbetsmiljöer
Funder
AFA Insurance, 130200
Note

QC 20170907

Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved
Abtahi, F., Forsman, M., Diaz-Olivazrez, J. A., Yang, L., Lu, K., Eklund, J., . . . Tiemann, C. (2017). Big Data & Wearable Sensors Ensuring Safety and Health @Work. In: GLOBAL HEALTH 2017, The Sixth International Conference on Global Health Challenges: . Paper presented at GLOBAL HEALTH 2017, The Sixth International Conference on Global Health Challenges.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Big Data & Wearable Sensors Ensuring Safety and Health @Work
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2017 (English)In: GLOBAL HEALTH 2017, The Sixth International Conference on Global Health Challenges, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

—Work-related injuries and disorders constitute a major burden and cost for employers, society in general and workers in particular. We@Work is a project that aims to develop an integrated solution for promoting and supporting a safe and healthy working life by combining wearable technologies, Big Data analytics, ergonomics, and information and communication technologies. The We@Work solution aims to support the worker and employer to ensure a healthy working life through pervasive monitoring for early warnings, prompt detection of capacity-loss and accurate risk assessments at workplace as well as self-management of a healthy working life. A multiservice platform will allow unobtrusive data collection at workplaces. Big Data analytics will provide real-time information useful to prevent work injuries and support healthy working life

Keywords
-Preventive Occupational Healthcare; Ergonomics; Wellbeing at Work.
National Category
Medical Ergonomics Other Medical Engineering
Research subject
Medical Technology; Applied Medical Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225652 (URN)978-1-61208-604-0 (ISBN)
Conference
GLOBAL HEALTH 2017, The Sixth International Conference on Global Health Challenges
Note

QC 20180416

Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Karltun, A., Karltun, J., Berglund, M. & Eklund, J. (2017). HTO - A complementary ergonomics approach. APPLIED ERGONOMICS, 59, 182-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HTO - A complementary ergonomics approach
2017 (English)In: APPLIED ERGONOMICS, ISSN 0003-6870, Vol. 59, p. 182-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The field of human factors and ergonomics constitutes a strong potential in systems analysis, design and improvement. However, it is difficult to communicate its potential value. This paper addresses how the human-technology-organization (HTO) concept can be defined and supports the understanding, communication and development of the systems' character and potential of human factors and ergonomics. Empirical examples from the authors' experiences of working with the HTO concept in R&D and teaching are illustrated, including its usefulness as: 1) a conceptual model; 2) an analysis framework; 3) a meta methodology; 4) a pedagogical tool; and 5) a design tool. The use of HTO provides guidance on how the system can be designed to better support health, individual and systems performance. It is further suggested that there is a strong potential for developing the theory, applications and methodological aspects of HTO.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Human-technology-organization, Systems approach, Interaction, Activity
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200181 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2016.08.024 (DOI)000390642000020 ()27890126 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84995804142 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170123

Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2017-03-02Bibliographically approved
Eklund, J. (2017). Keynote: The hidden relationship between ergonomics and quality. In: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists: . Paper presented at 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists: 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management, Banff, Alberta, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Keynote: The hidden relationship between ergonomics and quality
2017 (English)In: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

SUMMATIVE STATEMENT 

There is strong evidence that insufficient ergonomics cause quality deficiencies in production. Despite this, it has not yet been accepted that ergonomics is an important production factor. Reasons for this situation and possible actions are discussed.

 

PROBLEM STATEMENT 

The scientific literature reports many examples of relationships between ergonomics and quality. However, this knowledge has not been sufficiently systematized for ergonomics to become generally accepted as a production factor.

 

RESEARCH OBJECTIVE

The objective of this paper is to summarize different perspectives on the relationship between ergonomics and quality, and to discuss the formation of this knowledge on a generalized level.

 

RESULTS

There is a large number of studies and reviews that have identified strong relationships between the quality performance of individuals and different ergonomics aspects such as light, noise, vibration, ventilation, climate, cognition and physical ergonomics. Further, there are also a large number of studies that have identified a relationship between ergonomics and quality output for the organization in different production settings. There are also examples when causality has been shown. All together, this evidence point to that good ergonomics is a precondition for quality performance, in other words an important production factor.

 

DISCUSSION

The strong relationship between ergonomics and quality might be accepted within the ergonomics discipline, but not as a production factor and not in working life. TQM and Lean address quality and some aspects of work design as important production factors. There are many reasons why it is not generally recognized that ergonomics is an important production factor. Some of them might be that the research literature is not explicit on this point, the ergonomics knowledge is not spread to the production discipline, and that ergonomics is seen an additional luxury for the employees, provided when the economy of the organization is sufficiently strong. Still another reason might be that there are also examples of how ergonomics improvements can be shown to be unprofitable for the organization.

 

CONCLUSIONS  

A large number of research studies show strong evidence that insufficient ergonomics cause quality deficiencies in production, both on an individual and on an organizational level, confirming that ergonomics is a production factor. It is a problem that this knowledge is not formed, disseminated and accepted by production engineers and managers.

 

Keywords
Performance, TQM, Work environment, Disturbances, Production
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220796 (URN)
Conference
48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists: 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management, Banff, Alberta, Canada
Note

QC 20180109

Available from: 2018-01-07 Created: 2018-01-07 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Rolfö, L., Jahncke, H. & Eklund, J. (2017). Perceptions of performance and satisfaction after relocation to an activity-based office. Ergonomics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of performance and satisfaction after relocation to an activity-based office
2017 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many companies move from open-plan offices (OPO) to activity-based workplaces (ABWs). However, few studies examine the benefits and drawbacks following such a change. The aim of this study was to explore how physical conditions, office use, communication, privacy, territoriality, satisfaction and perceived performance change following a company’s relocation from an OPO to an ABW. A mixed methods approach included pre- and post-relocation questionnaires and post-relocation focus groups, individual interviews and observations. The questionnaires enabled comparisons over time (n = 34) and broader analyses based on retrospective ratings of perceived change (n = 66). Results showed that satisfaction with auditory privacy, background noise, air quality, outdoor view and aesthetics increased significantly after relocation. Negative outcomes, such as lack of communication within teams, were perceived as being due to the high people-to-workstation ratio and lack of rules. Overall satisfaction with the physical work environment increased in the ABW compared to the OPO. Perceived performance did not change significantly.

Practitioner Summary: Activity-based workplaces (ABWs) are commonly implemented although their effects on performance and well-being are unclear. This case study gives advice to stakeholders involved in office planning. Despite shortcomings with the people-to-workstation ratio and rules, employees showed improved satisfaction with auditory privacy and aesthetics in the ABW compared with the previous open-plan office.

Keywords
Flex office, office planning, privacy, communication, noise
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220445 (URN)10.1080/00140139.2017.1398844 (DOI)000427848800003 ()2-s2.0-85034248562 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 2014/1180-31
Note

QC 20171221

Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved
Rose, L. M., Eklund, J. & Barman, L. (2017). RAMP -  A new tool for MSD risk management in manualhandling. In: Conference Proceedings 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists  & 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management "Organizing for High Performance ": Organizing for High Performance. Paper presented at ACE-ODAM 2017, Banff, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>RAMP -  A new tool for MSD risk management in manualhandling
2017 (English)In: Conference Proceedings 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists  & 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management "Organizing for High Performance ": Organizing for High Performance, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Summative Statement: In this conference contribution RAMP (Risk Assessment and Management tool for Manual Handling - Proactively) will be presented. It is developed for managing MSD risks in manual handling jobs. The presentation will include a demonstration of the digitalised tool and information about upcoming Massive Open Online Courses about it.

Problem statement: Manual handling work is regarded as one of the main causes to increased risks of developing Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Several MSD risk assessment tools have been developed, but have been found to have insufficiencies in managing MSD risks in manual handling. The insufficiencies include that tools only assess certain body parts or certain types of work, are not freely accessible, assess exposure but not risks, and don´t support the whole risk management process. In 2009 there was a call from a global company, which had identified a need for a scientifically based, freely accessible, risk assessment and risk management tool. The tool should support systematic risk management of MSD risks in manual handling jobs and be able to be used by companies themselves. To meet this call the development of the RAMP tool (Risk Assessment and Management tool for Manual Handling – Proactively) was started. It has been developed in a research and development (R&D) project in close co-operation between researchers and practitioners at companies.

Research Objective: The objective of this conference contribution is to present the results of a seven year long R&D project: to describe the RAMP tool and its development, present the digitalised version, share some experiences from its use, and inform about upcoming RAMP Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), aimed at educating and training users in the RAMP tool.

Methodology: RAMP is scientifically based and was developed with a participative R&D methodology. The participating organisations as well as the methodology, including the base for the development, ranging from scientific publications and legislation to user testing and feed-back, will be described in the presentation.

Results: The RAMP tool consists of four parts: RAMP I, RAMP II, The Results module and the Action module. At the conference, these will be presented and the digitalised version of RAMP will be demonstrated. In addition, information about three Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) about the RAMP tool which are being developed will be presented and user experiences from applying RAMP will be shared. In addition to the oral presentation a workshop on RAMP is planned to be held at the conference.

Discussion: The discussion focuses on how methods like RAMP, which are freely accessible, can be spread after the R&D project is finished. Another question is how to secure updates in the future for methods which do not bring any profit for the developers/owners.

Conclusions: It is concluded that RAMP, a scientifically based new tool for risk management of MSD risks in manual handling, is freely available via KTH’s homepage and that a MOOC-package for disseminating knowledge and training on how to use the tool will be accessible from the autumn 2017.

Abstract [fr]

La présente communication décrit comment un nouvel outil de gestion des risques fondé sur la recherche (RAMP :

Risk Assessment and Management tool for Manual Handling) a été développé de même que la conception d'une formation en ligne souple pour utiliser l'outil et le mettre en application.

Keywords
Risk assessment, method, dissemination, MOOC, training, Évaluation des risques, méthode, diffusion, cours en ligne ouverts à tous (CLOT)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220675 (URN)
Conference
ACE-ODAM 2017, Banff, Canada
Projects
RAMP
Funder
AFA Insurance, Dnr 090168
Note

QC 20180111

Available from: 2017-12-29 Created: 2017-12-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Lindskog, P., Hemphälä, J., Eklund, J. & Eriksson, A. (2016). Lean in healthcare:: Engagement in development, job satisfaction or exhaustion?. Journal of Hospital Administration, 5(5), 91-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lean in healthcare:: Engagement in development, job satisfaction or exhaustion?
2016 (English)In: Journal of Hospital Administration, ISSN 1927-6990, E-ISSN 1927-7008, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 91-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conclusions about implementing the management concept lean in healthcare are contradictory and longitudinal studies are scarce. In particular, little is known of how working conditions contribute to the sustainability of lean in healthcare. The aim of this article is to identify to what extent lean tools (visual follow-up boards, standardised work, 5S [housekeeping], and value stream mapping [VSM]) promote working conditions for employees and managers in healthcare organisations (outcomes: engagement in development, job satisfaction and exhaustion), while considering the context (i.e., job resources and job demands) and aspects of the implementation process. A longitudinal quantitative study was conducted that involved employees and managers in two hospitals and one municipality (n = 448). Applying the job demands-resources model, multiple linear regression models were used. VSM, standardised work and 5S promoted employees and managers’ working conditions when supported by job resources. When no support was provided, visual follow-up boards were inhibiting employees and managers’ job satisfaction. VSM and standardised work were seen as central lean tools. In this sample, the application of lean cannot be considered sustainable as employees and managers’ working conditions deteriorated under the implementation of lean.

National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-198552 (URN)10.5430/jha.v5n5p91 (DOI)
Note

QC 20170117

Available from: 2016-12-18 Created: 2016-12-18 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Karltun, J., Vogel, K., Bergstrand, M. & Eklund, J. (2016). Maintaining knife sharpness in industrial meat cutting: A matter of knife or meat cutter ability. Applied Ergonomics, 56, 92-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maintaining knife sharpness in industrial meat cutting: A matter of knife or meat cutter ability
2016 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 56, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knife sharpness is imperative in meat cutting. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of knife blade steel quality with meat cutters' individual ability to maintain the cutting edge sharp in an industrial production setting. Twelve meat cutters in two different companies using three different knives during normal production were studied in this quasi-experimental study. Methods included were measuring knife cutting force before and after knife use, time knives were used, ratings of sharpness and discomfort and interviews. Results showed that the meat cutters' skill of maintaining sharpness during work had a much larger effect on knife sharpness during work than the knife steel differences. The ability was also related to feelings of discomfort and to physical exertion. It was found that meat cutters using more knives were more likely to suffer from discomfort in the upper limbs, which is a risk for developing MSD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Individual skill, MSD, Sharpness analyser, Steel quality, Cutting, Ergonomics, Cutting edges, Cutting forces, Individual skills, Industrial production, Knife sharpness, Meat cutters, Meats
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-186892 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2016.03.010 (DOI)000377316400012 ()2-s2.0-84962373597 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160518

Available from: 2016-05-18 Created: 2016-05-16 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Engkvist, I.-L., Eklund, J., Krook, J., Björkman, M. & Sundin, E. (2016). Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments. Applied Ergonomics, 57(SI), 17-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments
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2016 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 57, no SI, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Environment, Sustainability, Waste
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-187402 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2016.01.001 (DOI)000380082600003 ()
Note

QC 20160823

Available from: 2016-05-25 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5338-0586

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