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Singh, N. & Singh, O. P. (2015). Climate change, water and gender: Impact and adaptation in North-Eastern Hills of India. International Social Work, 58(3), 375-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change, water and gender: Impact and adaptation in North-Eastern Hills of India
2015 (English)In: International Social Work, ISSN 0020-8728, E-ISSN 1461-7234, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 375-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water resources in India are projected to face severe climate-induced stress. In the North-Eastern Hill region, where lifestyles are closely connected to nature, this holds great implications for human development. While scientific knowledge regarding climate change and water is growing at global and regional scales, an equally diverse body of knowledge on the human dimensions of the same at local levels is weak. This article attempts to bridge this knowledge gap by presenting micro-level evidence on the gendered impact of increasing water stress and the innovative gendered local adaptive strategies in this region. It urges for the need to re-think on adaptation planning, basing it on local templates for greater sustainability.

Keywords
Adaptation, climate change, gender, India, water
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-169141 (URN)10.1177/0020872814556826 (DOI)000353977900004 ()2-s2.0-84930463925 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

QC 20150612

Available from: 2015-06-12 Created: 2015-06-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Singh, N. (2013). Translating human right to water and sanitation into reality: a practical framework for analysis. Water Policy, 15(6), 943-960
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translating human right to water and sanitation into reality: a practical framework for analysis
2013 (English)In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 943-960Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The human right to water and sanitation has been most commonly approached from the perspective of legal machinery and mechanisms for its implementation. Perhaps an underlying assumption among human rights practitioners is that once action for implementing the right is undertaken, its realization will be achieved. Often ignored are factors and processes at the micro-level where action for implementing the right actually takes place. This paper aims to propose a practical framework for analyzing this context that influences the action undertaken for realizing the right. The framework derives from an empirical study in India and is based upon an understanding of the micro-level processes at the 'interface' where the duty-bearing agents implementing action come face-to-face with the right-holders in the community. Both are situated in their own local contexts - the 'implementation' and the 'socio-cultural' contexts respectively. The two contexts can in turn be understood as constituted of distinct 'norm-triads' and the interactions between these ultimately lead to 'realization' or 'non-realization' of the right. The paper further contends that in order to translate the human right to water and sanitation into reality, it is necessary to identify the gaps and contradictions between the two contexts and address these appropriately and adequately.

Keywords
Arsenic, Fluoride, Human right, India, Interface, Norm-triad, Right to water and sanitation, Socio-cultural context
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-139195 (URN)10.2166/wp.2013.020 (DOI)000327768100005 ()2-s2.0-84894075199 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

QC 20140114

Available from: 2014-01-14 Created: 2014-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Singh, N., Wickenberg, P., Åström, K. & Hydén, H. (2012). Accessing water through a rights-based approach: problems and prospects regarding children. Water Policy, 14(2), 298-318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accessing water through a rights-based approach: problems and prospects regarding children
2012 (English)In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 298-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The right to water has been recently recognized as a fundamental human right by the United Nations, thereby clarifying its status as 'legally binding', making it 'justiciable' and enforceable. This development has been heralded as a key that holds great potential to change the lives of the billions who still lack access to clean water. Many of those deprived of enjoyment of the right are children, who constitute up to a third of the population in the developing world. What is the value added of the rights-based approach for access to water, especially for children? Would recognition of the right to water as legally binding deliver real benefits to children in improving their access to water? Does it really offer anything new that can help them realize their right to water more effectively? These questions will be explored in this paper using empirical evidence from India, where water has been legally interpreted as a fundamental right, and as a welfare state, where there has been consistent effort on part of the state to improve children's access to water.

Keywords
Empowerment, Children, Gender, Human rights, India, Non-discrimination, Participation, Rights-based approach, Right to water
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-60640 (URN)10.2166/wp.2011.141 (DOI)000302128200007 ()2-s2.0-84858648297 (Scopus ID)
Note
QC 20120502. For full article, please contact Nandita Singh at nandita@kth.seAvailable from: 2012-01-13 Created: 2012-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Bhattacharya, P., Sracek, O., Eldvall, B., Asklund, R., Barmen, G., Jacks, G., . . . Balfors, B. B. (2012). Hydrogeochemical study on the contamination of water resources in a part of Tarkwa mining area, Western Ghana. Journal of African Earth Sciences, 66-67, 72-84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrogeochemical study on the contamination of water resources in a part of Tarkwa mining area, Western Ghana
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Journal of African Earth Sciences, ISSN 1464-343X, Vol. 66-67, p. 72-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the groundwater chemistry with special concern to metal pollution in selected communities in the Wassa West district, Ghana. In this mining area, 40 ground water samples, mainly from drilled wells, were collected. The groundwaters have generally from neutral to acidic pH values and their Eh values indicate oxidising conditions. The dominating ions are calcium, sodium, and bicarbonate. The metal concentrations in the study area are generally lower than those typically found in mining regions. Only 17 wells show metal concentrations exceeding WHO guidelines for at least one metal. The main contaminants are manganese and iron, but arsenic and aluminium also exceed the guidelines in some wells probably affected by acid mine drainage (AMD). Metal concentrations in the groundwater seem to be controlled by the adsorption processes. Hydrogeochemical modelling indicates supersaturation of groundwater with respect to several mineral phases including iron-hydroxides/oxides, suggesting that adsorption on these minerals may control heavy metal and arsenic concentrations in groundwater. The area is hilly, with many groundwater flow divides that result in several local flow systems. The aquifers therefore are not strongly affected by weathering of minerals due to short groundwater residence times and intense flushing. The local character of groundwater flow systems also prevents a strong impact of acid mine drainage on groundwater systems in a regional scale.

Keywords
Groundwater, Mining, Hydrogeochemistry, Metal pollution, Arsenic, Tarkwa
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-98333 (URN)10.1016/j.jafrearsci.2012.03.005 (DOI)000304514100007 ()2-s2.0-84859747954 (Scopus ID)
Funder
StandUp
Note

QC 20120625

Available from: 2012-06-25 Created: 2012-06-25 Last updated: 2013-04-16Bibliographically approved
Singh, N. (2012). Socio-cultural norms, human rights and access to water and sanitation. In: Malcolm Langford & Anna Russell (Ed.), The Right to Water: Theory, Practice & Prospects. Paper presented at International Conference on the Right to Water and Sanitation in Theory and Practice, Oslo. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socio-cultural norms, human rights and access to water and sanitation
2012 (English)In: The Right to Water: Theory, Practice & Prospects / [ed] Malcolm Langford & Anna Russell, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The human right to water and sanitation has been most commonly approached from the perspective of the machinery and mechanisms for its implementation. Perhaps the underlying assumption is that once action for implementation is undertaken, access to water and sanitation and hence realization of the right will be spontaneously achieved. Little attention has been drawn to the processes at the micro-level where such action for implementing the right takes place. This paper aims to propose a framework for understanding the micro-level processes at the ‘interface’ where the duty-bearing agents implementing action come face-to-face with the right-holders in the community who interpret the action within the context of their socio-cultural norms. This framework proposes that the actions for implementation are influenced by factors located in the ‘implementation context’ that is external to the right-holders’ community, while actual ‘realization’ of the right is ultimately influenced by factors situated in their ‘socio-cultural context’. The two contexts can in turn be understood as constituted of distinct ‘norm-triads’ comprising knowledge, will, and systemic conditions and possibilities. The framework is validated through an inter-disciplinary study in India where the respective norm-triads have been analysed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-62718 (URN)10.1017/9780511862601.020 (DOI)2-s2.0-85047504311 (Scopus ID)
Conference
International Conference on the Right to Water and Sanitation in Theory and Practice, Oslo
Note

QC 20130118

Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Singh, N. (2011). Climate Change And Water Stress: Gendered Impact And Adaptation In The Hills Of North-Eastern India. Paper presented at Conference on 'Gender & Climate Change: Women , Research & Action', Prato, Italy,15-16 September, 2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate Change And Water Stress: Gendered Impact And Adaptation In The Hills Of North-Eastern India
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

India is projected to face severe water challenges as a result of climate change. With a large population tied closely to natural resources, this will undermine human development in several ways. The hills in north-eastern India, representing one of the least developed regions of the country, have already been exposed to climate change impacts. Once known to be one of the wettest places of the world, access to water for domestic as well as productive uses is becoming increasingly difficult.

Gendered impact of these problems is evident as women and children (notably girls) face increasing difficulties in procuring water for domestic use. While earlier enough water used to be available in the vicinity of the village settlement for a greater part of the year, now the situation stands reversed, thereby enhancing their vulnerability in water-procuring tasks, with serious negative implications for their health and economic well-being and development, besides hindering children’s education.

A number of innovative local strategies are being adopted to address these challenges on the basis of traditional knowledge and technology. For example, women and children venture further and further down the hillslopes in search of new water sources. Another example is community tanks for storing rainwater to be used in the dry season. Roof-top rainwater harvesting is yet another traditionally designed strategy. However given the constraints of context and resources, only some of these innovative strategies turn out to be sustainable that can really help women adapt to the increasing water stress. There is a need to think more deeply on these local options & support women (as well as men) in developing more sustainable adaptive strategies based on their traditional knowledge & experiences. The proposed presentation will discuss the empirical findings of an in-depth field-based participatory research conducted in the region, which will help enhance knowledge and understanding for guiding policy on the issue in the context of hilly and mountainous regions.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-62796 (URN)
Conference
Conference on 'Gender & Climate Change: Women , Research & Action', Prato, Italy,15-16 September, 2011
Note

QC 20120123

Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2012-10-23Bibliographically approved
Singh, N. (2011). Equitable access to water: Opportunities and constraints in urban India. In: Abstract Volume, The World Water Week in Stockholm, 2011: Responding to Global Changes - Water in an Urbanising World. Paper presented at The Stockholm World Water Week, August 2011. Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Equitable access to water: Opportunities and constraints in urban India
2011 (English)In: Abstract Volume, The World Water Week in Stockholm, 2011: Responding to Global Changes - Water in an Urbanising World, Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) , 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), 2011
Keywords
Equity, water access, urban water, India, gender
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-62807 (URN)
Conference
The Stockholm World Water Week, August 2011
Note
Qc 20120202Available from: 2012-02-02 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2012-02-02Bibliographically approved
Singh, N. (2010). Managing Water pollution in Urban India: Problems and prospects. In: Jakob Ericsson and Ingrid Stangberg (Ed.), Proceedings of The Stockholm World Water Week, September 2010. Paper presented at The Stockholm World Water Week, September 5-11 2010 (pp. 414-415). Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute, SIWI
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing Water pollution in Urban India: Problems and prospects
2010 (English)In: Proceedings of The Stockholm World Water Week, September 2010 / [ed] Jakob Ericsson and Ingrid Stangberg, Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute, SIWI , 2010, p. 414-415Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute, SIWI, 2010
Keywords
water pollution, india, integrated approach, strategic communication, Yamuna
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-62519 (URN)
Conference
The Stockholm World Water Week, September 5-11 2010
Note
QC 20120120Available from: 2012-01-19 Created: 2012-01-19 Last updated: 2012-01-20Bibliographically approved
Singh, N. (2010). The Role of Water Quality for Human Health. Paper presented at Stockholm World Water Week, September 5-11 2010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Water Quality for Human Health
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-62805 (URN)
Conference
Stockholm World Water Week, September 5-11 2010
Note
QC 20120123. This invited presentation was made at the 'Young Water Professionals Seminar' at the Stockholm World Water Week 2010. Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2012-01-23Bibliographically approved
Singh, N. & Singh, O. P. (2009). Anthropology of Water: Perspectives from Traditional Water Management Regime in Rural India. Man in India, 89(1-2), 215-228
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anthropology of Water: Perspectives from Traditional Water Management Regime in Rural India
2009 (English)In: Man in India, ISSN 0025-1569, Vol. 89, no 1-2, p. 215-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water a natural resource, is characterized by multitudes of traits which are distinctively processed by diversified thoughts and beliefs orienting the behaviour-patterns of the people. The present paper highlights the integrated inter-relation between water as a natural sources and human societies. Water works as an essence in human existence and at the sametime it in seen that this particular element of the environment has been specifically moulded by the social-cultural patterns of the people in such a way that it takes the principal role in governing the peoples sacred and secular mode of life-situation. In the perspective of this view-point an attempt has been made here to study the traditional water management system that are still prevalent in Indian villages. This study is engaged to explore the water management pattern in the background of socio-cultural and ritualistic traditions in the caste-oriented villages in Bihar and Madhya Pradesh. Day to day water use by the people and the associated values, norms and taboos open up such a unique dimension which can best be illustrated and analysed through the domain of anthropology of water.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-81099 (URN)000208259900017 ()2-s2.0-80053482635 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20120213

Available from: 2012-02-10 Created: 2012-02-10 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6166-4992

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