kth.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 136) Show all publications
Choque Campero, L. A., Wang, W., Cardozo, E. & Martin, A. R. (2024). Biomass-based Brayton-Stirling-AGMD polygeneration for small-scale applications in rural areas. Energy, 304, Article ID 132033.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomass-based Brayton-Stirling-AGMD polygeneration for small-scale applications in rural areas
2024 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 304, article id 132033Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The lack of access to electricity and clean water still affects a substantial proportion of rural areas worldwide, in particular the global south. This paper presents a sustainable polygeneration system that can provide electricity, heat, and drinking water by using agricultural residues in remote rural areas. This polygeneration system consists of a solid biomass-fueled Brayton-Stirling combined cycle system, a boiler, and an air-gap membrane distillation unit. Four different system operation modes were designed to examine the most ideal configurations for maximizing power output, overall efficiency, and/or clean water production, considering a polygeneration system designed for a rural village with daily demands of 13450 kWh electricity and 7.5 m3 drinking water. A thermodynamic analysis are employed to analyze and compare these modes, each operating under steady state conditions. The highest electricity output, up to 160 kW, while the highest clean water is up to 0.7 m3/h. The fuel consumption can reach 0.9 kWh/kg of solid fuel and provide up to 0.0045 m3 of freshwater. In addition, nonlinear multi-objective optimization is used to meet the power demands of typical day in rural areas by varying the polygeneration operation modes and turbine inlet temperature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2024
Keywords
Biomass pellets, Brayton-Stirling cycle, Externally fired microturbine, Polygeneration, Rural electrification, Water desalination
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-348740 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2024.132033 (DOI)2-s2.0-85196430828 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240627

Available from: 2024-06-27 Created: 2024-06-27 Last updated: 2024-06-27Bibliographically approved
Choque Campero, L. A., Wang, W., Cardozo, E. & Martin, A. R. (2024). Decentralized biomass-based Brayton-Stirling power cycle with an air gap membrane distiller for supplying electricity, heat and clean water in rural areas. Applied Thermal Engineering, 254, Article ID 123889.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decentralized biomass-based Brayton-Stirling power cycle with an air gap membrane distiller for supplying electricity, heat and clean water in rural areas
2024 (English)In: Applied Thermal Engineering, ISSN 1359-4311, E-ISSN 1873-5606, Vol. 254, article id 123889Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ensuring access to essential services, such as clean water and electricity, is a key challenge for achieving sustainable development goals in rural areas. This study proposes a novel Brayton-Stirling combined cycle-based cogeneration system for utilizing locally available biomass waste to generate both electricity and clean water. The system employs an externally fired gas turbine, a Stirling engine, and an air–gap membrane distiller. Four operation modes—parallel-powered, fully-fired, straightforward, and by-pass—were modeled for their efficiency and output. Four operation modes can be switched by two three-way valves. Sunflower husk, identified as the most effective biomass source, enabled the system to achieve up to 160 kW of electricity and 0.7 m3/h of freshwater. The electrical and exergy efficiencies of the system peaked in the parallel-power mode, offering a practical solution for enhancing rural sustainability. Moreover, the by-pass mode maximized water production, highlighting its effectiveness in addressing water scarcity along with energy generation. Through a case study, the cogeneration system has demonstrated its capability in satisfying both rural electricity and water demands throughout the day by controlling the combination of different operation modes and parameters. Therefore, it provides a promising solution for advancing rural electrification and water purification in rural areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2024
Keywords
Biomass pellets, Brayton-Stirling cycle, Cogeneration, Externally fired microturbine, Rural electrification, Water desalination
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-350689 (URN)10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2024.123889 (DOI)001267223300001 ()2-s2.0-85197783149 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240719

Available from: 2024-07-17 Created: 2024-07-17 Last updated: 2024-07-22Bibliographically approved
Shan, L., Martin, A. R. & Chiu, J. N. (2024). Techno-economic analysis of latent heat thermal energy storage integrated heat pump for indoor heating. Energy, 298, Article ID 131291.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Techno-economic analysis of latent heat thermal energy storage integrated heat pump for indoor heating
2024 (English)In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 298, article id 131291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) implemented in residential heating systems has attracted attention for its role in peak/load shifting. A novel layout integrating LHTES with a heat pump is proposed to store low grade heat during off-peak demand period, later used as heat source for the heat pump during on-peak demand period. This novel layout is assessed according to different seasons, LHTES height-to-diameter (H/D) ratios, mass ratios of inflow water to radiator return water, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The results show that an overall increased amount of power input is required when utilizing LHTES, while it can shift 2.8–3.6 kW electricity from on-peak to off-peak. The case with an H/D ratio of 1.7 shows slight reductions in heating costs and LCOE as compared to a H/D ratio of 0.6. Considering heating costs, a mass ratio of 50 % performs better in December 2022 and a mass ratio of 10 % performs better in January 2023 due to different operating conditions. The heating costs of the integrated system are 1.0 %–2.1 % higher than those of the typical system due to limitations in the rated capacity of the heat pump and lower effectiveness of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2024
Keywords
Heat pump, Phase change material, Space heating, Techno-economic analysis, Thermal energy storage
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-346154 (URN)10.1016/j.energy.2024.131291 (DOI)001234695600001 ()2-s2.0-85191157749 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240506

Available from: 2024-05-03 Created: 2024-05-03 Last updated: 2024-06-14Bibliographically approved
Yang, H., Nurdiawati, A., Gond, R., Chen, S., Wang, S., Tang, B., . . . Han, T. (2023). Carbon-negative valorization of biomass waste into affordable green hydrogen and battery anodes. International journal of hydrogen energy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon-negative valorization of biomass waste into affordable green hydrogen and battery anodes
Show others...
2023 (English)In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The global Sustainable Development Goals highlight the necessity for affordable and clean energy, designated as SDG7. A sustainable and feasible biorefinery concept is proposed for the carbon-negative utilization of biomass waste for affordable H2 and battery anode material production. Specifically, an innovative tandem biocarbon + NiAlO + biocarbon catalyst strategy is constructed to realize a complete reforming of biomass pyro-vapors into H2+CO (as a mixture). The solid residues from pyrolysis are upgraded into high-quality hard carbon (HCs), demonstrating potential as sodium ion battery (SIBs) anodes. The product, HC-1600-6h, exhibited great electrochemical performance when employed as (SIBs) anodes (full cell: 263 Wh/kg with ICE of 89%). Ultimately, a comprehensive process is designed, simulated, and evaluated. The process yields 75 kg H2, 169 kg HCs, and 891 kg captured CO2 per ton of biomass achieving approx. 100% carbon and hydrogen utilization efficiencies. A life cycle assessment estimates a biomass valorization process with negative-emissions (−0.81 kg CO2/kg-biomass, reliant on Sweden wind electricity). A techno-economic assessment forecasts a notably profitable process capable of co-producing affordable H2 and hard carbon battery anodes. The payback period of the process is projected to fall within two years, assuming reference prices of 13.7 €/kg for HCs and 5 €/kg for H2. The process contributes to a novel business paradigm for sustainable and commercially viable biorefinery process, achieving carbon-negative valorization of biomass waste into affordable energy and materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2023
Keywords
Biomass, Pyrolysis, Catalytic reforming, Biochar, Syngas, Auger
National Category
Energy Engineering Materials Chemistry
Research subject
Energy Technology; Chemical Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-339172 (URN)10.1016/j.ijhydene.2023.09.096 (DOI)2-s2.0-85172247785 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2021-03735
Note

QC 20231106

Available from: 2023-11-03 Created: 2023-11-03 Last updated: 2023-11-06Bibliographically approved
Villarroel-Schneider, J., Balderrama, S., Sánchez, C., Cardozo, E., Malmquist, A. & Martin, A. R. (2023). Open-source model applied for techno-economic optimization of a hybrid solar PV biogas-based polygeneration plant: The case of a dairy farmers’ association in central Bolivia. Energy Conversion and Management, 291, Article ID 117223.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open-source model applied for techno-economic optimization of a hybrid solar PV biogas-based polygeneration plant: The case of a dairy farmers’ association in central Bolivia
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 291, article id 117223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Proper sizing of energy systems is a key aspect that allows avoiding overestimated installation costs or failures in operation and dispatch. However, most of the available sizing tools focus on systems dedicated only to electrical loads, omitting combined energy systems with simultaneous supply of various thermal demands. This study presents an adaptation of an existing open access techno-economic optimization model for broadening the design tool for small-scale energy systems supplying both, electrical and thermal needs. For this, a new typology of an energy system was proposed considering the use of biogas, solar energy and adding thermal components. This was followed by modifying the model framework, constraints equations and objective function, which is the net present cost of the system. Once the design tool was verified a model was constructed to analyse the feasibility of a polygeneration plant for an association of 30 small dairy farms. The developed model was able to optimize the sizing of the main system components for different proposed scenarios, encompassing supply of electricity, refrigeration, biogas for cooking and fertilizers. For the selected application it was found that the aggregated cost of producing electricity and heat ranges from 0.044 to 0.070 USD/kWh; the penetration of solar energy can reach up to 32%; while the annual potential savings of CO2 emissions of applying the solution ranges from 109 to 127 ton of CO2.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2023
Keywords
Biogas, Cogeneration, Dairy, Hybrid solar-biogas, Optimization, Techno-economic
National Category
Energy Engineering Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-331397 (URN)10.1016/j.enconman.2023.117223 (DOI)001034387500001 ()2-s2.0-85162266729 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230707

Available from: 2023-07-07 Created: 2023-07-07 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Yakah, N., Samavati, M., Akuoko Kwarteng, A., Martin, A. R. & Simons, A. (2023). Prospects of Waste Incineration for Improved Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Management in Ghana: A Review. Clean Technologies, 5(3), 997-1011
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospects of Waste Incineration for Improved Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Management in Ghana: A Review
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Clean Technologies, E-ISSN 2571-8797, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 997-1011Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The per capita municipal solid waste (MSW) generation per day in Ghana is estimated to be 0.47 kg/person/day, which translates to over 14,000 tonnes of solid waste generation daily. The disposal and management of this amount of solid waste has been challenging worldwide, and in Ghana, this is evident with the creation of unsanitary dumping sites scattered across most communities in the country, especially urban communities. The indiscriminate disposal of solid waste in Ghana is known to cause flooding, the pollution of water bodies, and the spread of diseases. The purpose of this review is to highlight the prospects of waste incineration with energy recovery as a waste-to-energy (WtE) technology which has contributed immensely to the disposal and management of MSW in nations worldwide (especially developed ones). The review indicates that waste incineration with energy recovery is a matured waste-to-energy technology in developed nations, and there are currently about 492 waste incineration plants in operation in the EU, over 77 in operation in about 25 states in the USA, and about 1900 in operation in Japan. Waste incineration with energy recovery is also gradually gaining prominence in developing nations like China, Brazil, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Indonesia, and Pakistan. The adoption of waste incineration with energy technology can reduce Ghana’s overdependence on fossil fuels as primary sources of energy. It is, however, recommended that a techno-economic assessment of proposed waste incineration facilities is performed considering the MSW generated in Ghana. Additionally, it is also recommended that the possibility of incorporating the use of artificial intelligence technology into the management of MSW in Ghana be investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2023
Keywords
disposal, fossil fuels, management, municipal solid waste, primary sources of energy, thermal power plant, waste incineration, waste to energy
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-337987 (URN)10.3390/cleantechnol5030050 (DOI)001071336400001 ()2-s2.0-85172108792 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20231012

Available from: 2023-10-12 Created: 2023-10-12 Last updated: 2023-10-16Bibliographically approved
Shan, L., Martin, A. R. & Chiu, J. N. (2023). Techno-Economic Analysis of Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Integrated Heat Pump for Indoor Heating. In: 36th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2023: . Paper presented at 36th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2023, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, Jun 25 2023 - Jun 30 2023 (pp. 2265-2276). Curran Associates, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Techno-Economic Analysis of Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Integrated Heat Pump for Indoor Heating
2023 (English)In: 36th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2023, Curran Associates, Inc. , 2023, p. 2265-2276Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Electricity prices have increased significantly in Europe and other regions due to the recent energy crisis. Latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) implemented in residential heating systems has attracted attention for its role in peak/load shifting to reduce heating costs. A new layout with LHTES integrated with a heat pump (HP) is proposed here to store low grade heat during off-peak demand periods, later used as heat source for the heat pump during peak demand periods. This novel layout is assessed for its heat capacity variation and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The results show that increased amount of power input is required when a storage component is integrated into the heating system, while it can be compensated by shifting to off-peak electricity usage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Curran Associates, Inc., 2023
Keywords
Heat Pump, Phase Change Material, Techno-Economic Analysis, Thermal Energy Storage
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-339293 (URN)10.52202/069564-0204 (DOI)2-s2.0-85174490620 (Scopus ID)
Conference
36th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2023, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, Jun 25 2023 - Jun 30 2023
Note

Part of ISBN 9781713874928

QC 20231106

Available from: 2023-11-06 Created: 2023-11-06 Last updated: 2023-11-06Bibliographically approved
Choque Campero, L. A., Wang, W. & Martin, A. R. (2023). Thermodynamic and exergetic analyses of a biomass-fired Brayton-Stirling cogeneration cycle for decentralized, rural applications. Energy Conversion and Management, 292, Article ID 117350.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermodynamic and exergetic analyses of a biomass-fired Brayton-Stirling cogeneration cycle for decentralized, rural applications
2023 (English)In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 292, article id 117350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Access to electricity in many remote rural areas of the world is wanting and often relies on decentralized concepts that are environmentally detrimental, costly, and unreliable. The purpose of this study was to examine an approach to meet this need that is based on an external biomass-fueled cogeneration system incorporating combined cycles for maximizing efficiency while ensuring robust operation. Specifically, the first and second laws of thermodynamics were analyzed in a system composed of a Brayton-Stirling cycle and a water boiler to compare efficiency, heat and electricity generation under three different power layouts of cogeneration for applications in the range of 100-200 kW electrical power output. The results show that overall efficiency is maximized at 85% with a hybrid power layout for cases where the turbine inlet temperature is 1273 K, the pressure ratio is 0.4, the regenerator effectiveness is 0.95, and the dead volume of the Stirling engine is 0.3. These findings provide a basis for implementing cogeneration systems to improve the reliability and robustness of power systems for rural electrification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2023
Keywords
Combined cycled, Stirling engine, Externally fired microturbine, Solid biomass, Open Brayton cycle, Rural electrification
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-333750 (URN)10.1016/j.enconman.2023.117350 (DOI)001032482600001 ()2-s2.0-85163897469 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230810

Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2024-05-16Bibliographically approved
Villarroel-Schneider, J., Höglund-Isaksson, L., Mainali, B., Martí-Herrero, J., Cardozo Rocabado, E., Malmquist, A. & Martin, A. R. (2022). Energy self-sufficiency and greenhouse gas emission reductions in Latin American dairy farms through massive implementation of biogas-based solutions. Energy Conversion and Management, 261, 115670-115670, Article ID 115670.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy self-sufficiency and greenhouse gas emission reductions in Latin American dairy farms through massive implementation of biogas-based solutions
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 261, p. 115670-115670, article id 115670Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The transition towards sustainable economies with improved resource efficiency is today’s challenge for all productive sectors. The dairy sector in Latin America is growing without considering a clear path for sustainable energy and waste management solutions. This study proposes integrated solutions through a waste-to-energy approach. The solutions consider biogas production (via cow manure) as the main energy conversion pathway; technology solutions include biodigesters, power generators, and combined heat and power systems that supply not only the energy services demanded by dairy farms (for cooking gas, electricity, refrigeration and hot water) but also provide organic fertilizers. Biogas’ potential was estimated to verify whether it can cover the energy demands of the farms, while the levelized costs of producing biogas and electricity were the indicators for the techno-economic evaluation of the solutions. Greenhouse gas emission reductions were estimated by following IPCC guidelines. Specifically, the proposed solutions lead to energy self-sufficiency in most dairy farms with relevant biogas and electricity costs in the range of 1.7–3.7 and 6–12 USD cents/kWh, respectively. In addition, implementing the proposed solutions in Latin American dairy farms would allow annual greenhouse gas emission reductions of 32.8 Mton CO2 eq. with an additional 17 Mton if widespread use of the supplied organic fertilizers is achieved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2022
Keywords
Energy self-sufficiency, Dairy farms, Latin America, Biogas-based solution, GHG emission reduction, Waste-to-energy
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-312816 (URN)10.1016/j.enconman.2022.115670 (DOI)000803716500003 ()2-s2.0-85129060839 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

QC 20230214

Available from: 2022-05-23 Created: 2022-05-23 Last updated: 2023-02-14Bibliographically approved
Wen, Y., Wang, S., Shi, Z., Jin, Y., Thomas, J.-B., Azzi, E. S., . . . Yang, W. (2022). Pyrolysis of engineered beach-cast seaweed: Performances and life cycle assessment. Water Research, 222, Article ID 118875.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pyrolysis of engineered beach-cast seaweed: Performances and life cycle assessment
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 222, article id 118875Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The blooming of beach-cast seaweed has caused environmental degradation in some coastal regions. Therefore, a proper treating and utilizing method of beach-cast seaweed is demanded. This study investigated the potential of producing power or biofuel from pyrolysis of beach-cast seaweed and the effect of the ash-washing process. First, the raw and washed beach-cast seaweeds (RS and WS) were prepared. Thereafter, thermogravimetric analysis (TG), bench-scale pyrolysis experiment, process simulation, and life cycle assessment (LCA) were conducted. The TG results showed that the activation energies of thermal decomposition of the main organic contents of RS and WS were 44.23 and 58.45 kJ/mol, respectively. Three peak temperatures of 400, 500, and 600 degrees C were used in the bench-scale pyrolysis experiments of WS. The 600 degrees C case yielded the most desirable gas and liquid products. The bench-scale pyrolysis experiment of RS was conducted at 600 degrees C as well. Also, an LCA was conducted based on the simulation result of 600 degrees C pyrolysis of WS. The further process simulation and LCA results show that compare to producing liquid biofuel and syngas, a process designed for electricity production is most favored. It was estimated that treating 1 ton of dry WS can result in a negative cumulative energy demand of -2.98 GJ and carbon emissions of -790.89 kg CO2 equivalence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2022
Keywords
Pyrolysis, Beach-cast seaweed, Biochar, LCA, Negative emission
National Category
Water Engineering Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-347671 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2022.118875 (DOI)000878990900003 ()35870392 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134683870 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240613

Available from: 2024-06-13 Created: 2024-06-13 Last updated: 2024-06-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3661-7016

Search in DiVA

Show all publications