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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
(2018). One Table Two Elephants. Stockholm and Cape Town: CPH:DOX 2018, Copenhagen International Film Festival
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One Table Two Elephants
2018 (English)Artistic output (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm and Cape Town: CPH:DOX 2018, Copenhagen International Film Festival, 2018
Keyword
Postcolonial; Urban nature; Knowledge; Expertise; Indigenous; Apartheid
National Category
Visual Arts History of Technology Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-230801 (URN)
Note

QC 20180618

This film is part of a wider project that uses film as a tool for research to challenge and complement the use of pen and paper in the humanities. We call this Visual Humanities and we closely with others in the Environmental Humanities.

Available from: 2018-06-16 Created: 2018-06-16 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Erixon Aalto, H. & Ernstson, H. (2017). Of plants, high lines and horses: Civic groups and designers in the relational articulation of values of urban natures. Landscape and Urban Planning (157), 309-321
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Of plants, high lines and horses: Civic groups and designers in the relational articulation of values of urban natures
2017 (English)In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, no 157, p. 309-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper addresses three interventions into urban green spaces—a wetland in Cape Town, a postindustrial site in New York, and a park outside London. Through their different contexts, they help to graspa wider phenomenon: the protection of urban nature through the development of protective narratives.We analyze these interventions as examples of “value articulation”, which we view as a relational and sociomaterial practice that requires the enrolment of people, plants, and things that together perform,spread, and deploy stories about why given places need protection. For each case study, we also highlight the moments when narrative practices move beyond mere protection and start to change the very contextin which they were developed. We refer to these as projective narratives, emphasizing how novel valuesand uses are projected onto these spaces, opening them up for reworking. Our analyses of these successful attempts to protect land demonstrate how values emerge as part of inclusive, yet specific, narratives thatmobilize and broaden support and constituencies. By constructing spatial linkages, such narratives embed places in wider geographical ‘wholes’ and we observe how the physical landscape itself becomes an activenarrative element. In contrast to rationalist and external frameworks for analyzing values in relation tourban natures (e.g., ecosystem services), our ‘bottom-up’ mode situates urban nature in specific contexts,helping us to profoundly rethink planning and practice in order to (i) challenge expert categories and city/nature dichotomies; (ii) provide vernacular ways of knowing/understanding; and (iii) rethink the role of urban designers.

Keyword
Protective narratives, Value articulation, Expertise and design professions, Ecosystem services, Urban nature conservation, Cape Town, New York, London, High Line
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-217142 (URN)10.1016/j.landurbplan.2016.05.018 (DOI)000390183300029 ()2-s2.0-84982273772 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171106

Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
Erixon Aalto, H. & Ernstson, H. (2017). Of Plants, High Lines and Horses: Civics and Designers in the Relational Articulation of Values of Urban Natures. Landscape and Urban Planning, 157, 309-321
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Of Plants, High Lines and Horses: Civics and Designers in the Relational Articulation of Values of Urban Natures
2017 (English)In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 157, p. 309-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper addresses three interventions into urban green spaces—a wetland in Cape Town, a post- industrial site in New York, and a park outside London. Through their different contexts, they help to grasp a wider phenomenon: the protection of urban nature through the development of protective narratives. We analyze these interventions as examples of “value articulation”, which we view as a relational and sociomaterial practice that requires the enrolment of people, plants, and things that together perform, spread, and deploy stories about why given places need protection. For each case study, we also highlight the moments when narrative practices move beyond mere protection and start to change the very context in which they were developed. We refer to these as projective narratives, emphasizing how novel values and uses are projected onto these spaces, opening them up for reworking. Our analyses of these successful attempts to protect land demonstrate how values emerge as part of inclusive, yet specific, narratives that mobilize and broaden support and constituencies. By constructing spatial linkages, such narratives embed places in wider geographical ‘wholes’ and we observe how the physical landscape itself becomes an active narrative element. In contrast to rationalist and external frameworks for analyzing values in relation to urban natures (e.g., ecosystem services), our ‘bottom-up’ mode situates urban nature in specific contexts, helping us to profoundly rethink planning and practice in order to (i) challenge expert categories and city/nature dichotomies; (ii) provide vernacular ways of knowing/understanding; and (iii) rethink the role of urban designers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192256 (URN)10.1016/j.landurbplan.2016.05.018 (DOI)000390183300029 ()2-s2.0-84982273772 (Scopus ID)
Projects
MOVE Socioecological movements in urbanised ecosystems
Funder
Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, 211-2011-1519
Note

QC 20160908

Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Lawhon, M., Nilsson, D., Silver, J., Ernstson, H. & Lwasa, S. (2017). Thinking through Heterogeneous Infrastructure Configurations. Urban Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thinking through Heterogeneous Infrastructure Configurations
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2017 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies of infrastructure have demonstrated broad differences between Northern and Southern cities, and deconstructed urban theory derived from experiences of the networked urban regions of the global North. This includes critiques of the universalization of the historically-culturally produced normative ideal of universal, uniform infrastructure. We introduce the notion of “heterogeneous infrastructure configurations” (HICs) as a way to analyze urban infrastructure that builds on postcolonial critiques of knowledge, as well as ethnographies of everyday Southern urbanisms. We argue that the notion of HIC helps us to move beyond technological and performative accounts of actually existing infrastructures to provide an analytical lens through which to compare different configurations. Our approach enables a clearer analysis of infrastructural artifacts not as individual objects but as parts of geographically spread socio-technological configurations: configurations which might involve many different kinds technologies, relations, capacities and operations, entailing different risks and power relationships. We use examples from ongoing research on sanitation and waste in Kampala, Uganda- a city in which service delivery is characterized by multiplicity, overlap, disruption and inequality- to demonstrate the kinds of research questions that emerge when thinking through the notion of HICs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keyword
infrastructure; provincialising theory; Southern theory; urban political ecology; urban theory, 关键词基础设施, 地方化理论, 南半球理论, 城市政治生态学, 城市理论
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment; History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-216408 (URN)10.1177/0042098017720149 (DOI)000425065500003 ()2-s2.0-8504216514 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Heterogenous Infrastructure Configurations in Uganda Project HICCUP
Note

QC 20171102

Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-06-19
Lawhon, M., Silver, J., Ernstson, H. & Pierce, J. (2016). Unlearning [Un]Located Ideas in the Provincialization of Urban Theory. Paper presented at Lawhon, Mary, Jonathan D Silver, Henrik Ernstson, and Joe Pierce. 2016. “Unlearning [Un]Located Ideas in the Provincialization of Urban Theory.” Regional Studies 50 (9): 1611–22. doi:10.1080/00343404.2016.1162288.. Regional studies, 50(9), 1611-1622
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unlearning [Un]Located Ideas in the Provincialization of Urban Theory
2016 (English)In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 1611-1622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Postcolonial scholars have argued for the provincialization of urban knowledge, but doing so remains an opaque process. This paper argues that explicit attention to 'learning to unlearn' unstated theoretical assumptions and normativities can aid in provincialization, and demonstrate ways in which theorizing entails a socio-spatial situation. The authors' efforts to grapple with operationalizing learning to unlearn in three different urban cases are described, followed by an articulation of strategies for theorizing which more explicitly acknowledge theory-building's situatedness as well as points of reflection for developing postcolonial urban theory. It is argued that this usefully shifts the focus of unlearning from 'who' is theorizing 'where' towards theory's unstated norms and assumptions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keyword
urbananization, urban theory, theory from the South, Global South, urban studies
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192251 (URN)10.1080/00343404.2016.1162288 (DOI)000380373900012 ()2-s2.0-84965041851 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Lawhon, Mary, Jonathan D Silver, Henrik Ernstson, and Joe Pierce. 2016. “Unlearning [Un]Located Ideas in the Provincialization of Urban Theory.” Regional Studies 50 (9): 1611–22. doi:10.1080/00343404.2016.1162288.
Projects
HICCUP
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 211-2011-1519
Note

QC 20160912

Corection in ”Correction in: Regional Studies, 2016, vol. 50, issue. 9, page. EI-EI. Doi: 10.1080/00343404.2016.1189117, WOS: 000380373900001

Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Barthel, S., Parker, J. & Ernstson, H. (2015). Food and Green Space in Cities: A Resilience Lens on Gardens and Urban Environmental Movements. Urban Studies, 52(7), 1321-1338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food and Green Space in Cities: A Resilience Lens on Gardens and Urban Environmental Movements
2015 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1321-1338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the role played by urban gardens during historical collapses in urban food supply lines and identifies the social processes required to protect two crit- ical elements of urban food production during times of crisis—open green spaces and the collective memory of how to grow food. Advanced communication and transport technologies allow food sequestration from the farthest reaches of the planet, but have markedly increasing urban dependence on global food systems over the past 50 years. Simultaneously, such advances have eroded collective memory of food production, while suitable spaces for urban gardening have been lost. These factors combine to heighten the potential for food shortages when—as occurred in the 20th century— major economic, political or environmental crises sever supply lines to urban areas. This paper considers how to govern urban areas sustainably in order to ensure food security in times of crisis by: evincing the effectiveness of urban gardening during crises; showing how allotment gardens serve as conduits for transmitting collective social-ecological memories of food production; and, discussing roles and strategies of urban environmental movements for protecting urban green space. Urban gardening and urban social movements can build local ecological and social response capacity against major collapses in urban food supplies. Hence, they should be incorporated as central elements of sustainable urban development. Urban governance for resilience should be historically informed about major food crises and allow for redundant food production solutions as a response to uncertain futures.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-145916 (URN)10.1177/0042098012472744 (DOI)000351853200007 ()2-s2.0-84925639103 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Socioecological Movements in Urbanized Ecosystems (MOVE)Ways of Knowing Urban Ecologies (WOK-UE)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 211-2011-1519Swedish Research Council Formas, 250-2010-1372
Note

QC 20150625

Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Ernstson, H. (2014). Book Review. Greening Berlin: The Co-Production of Science, Politics, and Urban Nature. Science & Technology Studies, 27(1), 113-116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book Review. Greening Berlin: The Co-Production of Science, Politics, and Urban Nature
2014 (English)In: Science & Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2243-4690, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 113-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keyword
STS, Urban ecology, Urban planning, Urban political ecology
National Category
History of Technology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-145906 (URN)
Projects
Ways of Knowing Urban Ecologies (WOK-UE)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 250-2010-1372
Note

QC 20140924

Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Ernstson, H., Lawhon, M. & Duminy, J. (2014). Conceptual Vectors of African Urbanism: 'Engaged Theory-Making' and 'Platforms of Engagement'. Regional studies, 48(9), 1563-1577
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptual Vectors of African Urbanism: 'Engaged Theory-Making' and 'Platforms of Engagement'
2014 (English)In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1563-1577Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban political ecology (UPE) has provided critical insights into the sociomaterial construction of urban environments, their unequal distribution of resources, and contestation over power and resources. Most of this work is rooted in Marxist urban geographical theory, which provides a useful but limited analysis. Such works typically begin with a historical-materialist theory of power, then examine particular artifacts and infrastructure to provide a critique of society.We argue that there aremultipleways of expanding this framing, including through political ecology or wider currents of Marxism. Here, we demonstrate one possibility: starting from theory and empirics in the South, specifically, African urbanism. We show how African urbanism can inform UPE and the associated research methods, theory and practice to create a more situated UPE. We begin suggesting what a situated UPE might entail: starting with everyday practices, examining diffuse forms of power, and opening the scope for radical incrementalism.

Keyword
Comparative urbanism, Africa, Urban theory, Practice, Conceptual vectors, Informality
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-145909 (URN)10.1080/00343404.2014.892573 (DOI)000340724800008 ()2-s2.0-84906837588 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Ways of Knowing Urban Ecologies (WOK-UE)
Funder
Formas, 250-2010-1372
Note

QC 20140919

[Des vecteurs conceptuels de l'urbanisme africain: La 'construction des théories engagées' et des 'plates-formes d'engagement']

Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Anderson, P. M., Avlonitis, G. & Ernstson, H. (2014). Ecological outcomes of civic and expert-led urban greening projects using indigenous plant species in Cape Town, South Africa. Landscape and Urban Planning, 127, 104-113
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological outcomes of civic and expert-led urban greening projects using indigenous plant species in Cape Town, South Africa
2014 (English)In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 127, p. 104-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parks and private and public gardens do not exist in isolation, but form part of the urban fabric, contributing to ecological functioning. There is growing interest in how civil society shapes urban ecologies and vegetation patterns. This paper explores the ecological outcomes of a series of indigenous plant greening interventions in Cape Town. The six different sites were sampled: two civic-led intervention sites, one expert-led rehabilitation site, two conservation sites and one abandoned site. These sites are compared in terms of their plant and insect diversity and then discussed in relation to their contingent management arrangements and in relation to conservation and abandoned land. Plant and insect diversity measured at the civic-led greening intervention sites suggest these sites are similar to adjacent conservation sites, while floristic composition differs. The inclusion of a vacant lot with poor species and growth form diversity shows the significant role of intervention in the ecological reformation of urban green space. By emphasizing the ecological outcomes, this study highlights the importance of civil society in linking conservation goals to more broad-based notions of quality of life and the 'good and just city'. Our results indicate that civic-led efforts warrant attention in keeping with those of experts, both in relation to meeting indigenous conservation targets, as well as supporting functional groups and wider ecological processes, with the acknowledged exception of fire. How to integrate such civic-led interventions into urban biodiversity management planning is still an open question.

Keyword
Civic-led, Greening, Urban ecology
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-145910 (URN)10.1016/j.landurbplan.2014.03.007 (DOI)000337878700011 ()2-s2.0-84901197190 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Formas, 211-2011-1519
Note

QC 20140805

Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Mills, M., Álvarez-Romero, J. G., Vance-Borland, K., Cohen, P., Pressey, R. L., Guerrero, A. M. & Ernstson, H. (2014). Linking regional planning and local action: Towards using social network analysis in systematic conservation planning. Biological Conservation, 169, 6-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linking regional planning and local action: Towards using social network analysis in systematic conservation planning
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2014 (English)In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 169, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social networks play an important role in facilitating effective and sustained connections between people responsible for regional conservation plans and those responsible for local conservation actions. Yet, few studies have utilized social network analysis in systematic conservation planning initiatives; this, in spite of social network analysis being developed as a structural and relational approach to describe and ana- lyze the characteristics of patterns of relationships that make collaborative efforts more or less effective at solving natural resource management problems. Systematic conservation planning provides a frame- work for allocating actions in time and space to promote the conservation of biodiversity. Our study dis- cusses three potential contributions of social network analysis to systematic conservation planning: identifying stakeholders and their roles in social networks, and characterizing relationships between them; designing and facilitating strategic networking to strengthen linkages between local and regional conservation initiatives; and prioritizing conservation actions using measures of social connectivity alongside ecological data. We propose that social network analysis has the potential to be a valuable tool to support decision making in conservation planning. We identify challenges and future research ques- tions to be addressed to allow the integration of social network analysis into conservation planning processes.?

Keyword
conservation area design, natural resource management, spatial prioritization
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-145908 (URN)10.1016/j.biocon.2013.10.015 (DOI)000333574400002 ()2-s2.0-84887713255 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 250-2010-1372
Note

Qc 20140912

Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6415-4821

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