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Haas, T. & Mehaffy, M. W. (2019). Introduction: the future of public space. Urban Design International, 24(1), 1-3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: the future of public space
2019 (English)In: Urban Design International, ISSN 1357-5317, E-ISSN 1468-4519, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-250874 (URN)10.1057/s41289-018-0062-3 (DOI)000464909600001 ()2-s2.0-85042704636 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correction

QC 20190507

Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Haas, T. & Mehaffy, M. W. (2019). Introduction: the future of public space (vol 24, pg 1, 2019). Urban Design International, 24(1), 75-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: the future of public space (vol 24, pg 1, 2019)
2019 (English)In: Urban Design International, ISSN 1357-5317, E-ISSN 1468-4519, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 75-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The following paragraph on page 2 (bottom of first column) has been moved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PALGRAVE MACMILLAN LTD, 2019
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-250875 (URN)10.1057/s41289-019-00090-w (DOI)000464909600008 ()2-s2.0-85063520554 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190507

Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Mehaffy, M. W., Haas, T. & Elmlund, P. (2019). Public space in the new urban agenda: Research into implementation. Urban Planning, 4(2), 134-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public space in the new urban agenda: Research into implementation
2019 (English)In: Urban Planning, ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 134-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The New Urban Agenda is a landmark international framework for urbanisation for the next two decades, adopted by acclamation by all 193 countries of the United Nations. Nonetheless, implementation remains an enormous challenge, as does the related need for research evidence to inform practice. This thematic issue brings together research from a number of participants of the Future of Places conference series, contributing new research to inform the development and implementation of the New Urban Agenda, and with a focus on the fundamental topic of public space creation and improvement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogitatio Press, 2019
Keywords
Evidence-based design, Future of Places, New Urban Agenda, Public space, Research into practice
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-262451 (URN)10.17645/up.v4i2.2293 (DOI)000488258500001 ()2-s2.0-85070521125 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191018

Available from: 2019-10-18 Created: 2019-10-18 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Mehaffy, M. W. & Haas, T. (2018). Informality in the new urban agenda: A “new paradigm?”. Berkeley Planning Journal, 30(1), 6-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Informality in the new urban agenda: A “new paradigm?”
2018 (English)In: Berkeley Planning Journal, ISSN 1047-5192, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 6-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The New Urban Agenda, the outcome document of the United Nations Habitat III conference in 2016, was adopted by consensus by all 193 member states of the United Nations. The Habitat III leadership has proclaimed that the document represents a “new paradigm” in urban planning, reversing the “over-determined” model of 20th century Western-dominated planning, and embracing more locally-determined forms of informality. This paper examines the intellectual history of the document, and compares it to its antecedents, thereby evaluating the claim that it represents a new paradigm. The conclusion assesses implications for future planning practice, particularly as we confront an age of rapid urbanization in many parts of the globe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of California at Berkeley, 2018
Keywords
Charter of Athens, Informality, New Urban Agenda, Self-organization, Social Production
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-247230 (URN)2-s2.0-85061661715 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190402

Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-04-02Bibliographically approved
Danenberg, R. & Haas, T. (2018). New trends in bottom-up urbanism and governance-reformulating ways for mutual engagement between municipalities and citizen-led urban initiatives. In: The Palgrave Handbook of Bottom-Up Urbanism: (pp. 113-129). Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New trends in bottom-up urbanism and governance-reformulating ways for mutual engagement between municipalities and citizen-led urban initiatives
2018 (English)In: The Palgrave Handbook of Bottom-Up Urbanism, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 113-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter addresses how bottom-up urbanism relates to urban governance in Europe. The recent proliferation of bottom-up urban initiatives contrasts with the conventional system of top-down planning. This chapter includes eight examples of bottom-up initiatives from Stockholm, Sweden, and Istanbul, Turkey. Three conclusions can be drawn: first, the discrepancy between organizational structures, a hierarchical governmental structure, and the dominance of politics create missing links in the relationship between municipalities and citizen-led urban initiatives; second, new governance arrangements alone are not enough to create opportunities for citizens to partake in participatory methods and to be involved in decision-making processes; third, the political perspective of social innovation reformulates mutual engagement by introducing political liaisons, such as municipal guides or neighborhood councils.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing, 2018
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236275 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-90131-2_8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85053746218 (Scopus ID)9783319901312 (ISBN)9783319901305 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20181029

Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Haas, T. & Locke, R. (2018). Reflections on the Re-Urbanism Paradigm: Re-Weaving The Urban Fabric for Urban Regeneration and Renewal. Questiones Geographicae, 37(4), 5-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflections on the Re-Urbanism Paradigm: Re-Weaving The Urban Fabric for Urban Regeneration and Renewal
2018 (English)In: Questiones Geographicae, ISSN 0137-477X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 5-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Within the realm of contemporary urban design theory and practice, a number of authors have conceptualised the trends and processes of city development and planning into a series of urbanisms. This discussion essay examines the overall tenets of the 'ReUrbanism paradigm', a paradigm that has long been present in city planning and development but has received limited analysis and criticism and has not gained a more integrated position within the professional and academic worlds. This paper continues a paradigm development outline, leaning on the characteristics of other urbanisms in order to develop and provide a frame of reference and to contribute to the ongoing build-up of taxonomies about the trajectory of contemporary urban design thought. Focusing on the American representative case of Detroit, the authors of this paper argue for a better understanding of this urban regeneration paradigm, which they characterise as a rational urban planning & design approach in the contemporary age of inner city renewal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Poland: De Gruyter Open, 2018
Keywords
urbanism, urban design, urban paradigms, urban decline, urban regeneration
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-249731 (URN)10.2478/quageo-2018-0037 (DOI)000455440900001 ()2-s2.0-85059977147 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190423

Available from: 2019-04-19 Created: 2019-04-19 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Locke, R., Mehaffy, M., Haas, T. & Olsson, K. (2018). Urban Heritage as a Generator of Landscapes: Building New Geographies from Post-Urban Decline in Detroit. Urban Science, 2(3), 1-16, Article ID 92.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Heritage as a Generator of Landscapes: Building New Geographies from Post-Urban Decline in Detroit
2018 (English)In: Urban Science, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-16, article id 92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At this historical moment, the urban planning and design professions are confronted with the twin challenges of unprecedented rapid urbanization on the one hand, and declining post-industrial regions on the other. In this environment, there are many different and often conflicting ideas about urban heritage and its relevance for contemporary urban planning and design. In this paper, we look for commonalities and a way forward from among a range of competing urban design models. We examine the illustrative case study of the geography and landscape of Detroit, USA. We consider seven contemporary urban planning and design ideals that dominate the contemporary planning and design discourse and their different views of the past and urban heritage in relation to the approaches in Detroit. From these, we draw a synthesis approach, making several recommendations and observations with a focus on the capacities of so-called “placemaking” approaches. In this paper, urban heritage is understood and examined as contributing a pattern of infrastructure that provides a helpful supportive framework, and (importantly) a set of structural limitations (e.g., historic plot boundaries), that can serve as a generative resource for new urban planning and design. We conclude that the necessary framework for democratic participation and opportunity within urban space can be provided most directly by leveraging the assets of urban heritage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
urban heritage; urban design; urban decline; placemaking; Detroit
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-249730 (URN)10.3390/urbansci2030092 (DOI)
Note

QC 20190423

Available from: 2019-04-19 Created: 2019-04-19 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Haas, T. (2016). Beyond the sustainable urban design roadmaps. Journal of Urban Design, 21(1), 38-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond the sustainable urban design roadmaps
2016 (English)In: Journal of Urban Design, ISSN 1357-4809, E-ISSN 1469-9664, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 38-40Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-185392 (URN)10.1080/13574809.2016.1114716 (DOI)000372552000007 ()2-s2.0-84956777125 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160418

Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
D'Acci, L., Haas, T. & Bardhan, R. (2016). Inaugural Editorial of Urban Planning. URBAN PLANNING, 1(1), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inaugural Editorial of Urban Planning
2016 (English)In: URBAN PLANNING, ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

This editorial is the introductory piece of Urban Planning, a new international peer-reviewed open access journal of urban studies aimed at advancing understanding of and ideas about humankind's habitats in order to promote progress and quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COGITATIO PRESS, 2016
Keywords
future cities, progress, urban forms, urban planning
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214923 (URN)10.17645/up.v1i1.586 (DOI)000408825000001 ()2-s2.0-85044459647 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 2017-09-25

Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Locke, R. & Haas, T. (2016). Sustainable Urbanism Solutions for Breaking the Bonds of Concentrated Poverty in Public Housing. Urban Design Tsingua University Press, 2(004), 40-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Urbanism Solutions for Breaking the Bonds of Concentrated Poverty in Public Housing
2016 (English)In: Urban Design Tsingua University Press, ISSN 2096-1235, Vol. 2, no 004, p. 40-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historically, a large number of public housing estates in the United States and Europe have had concentrated poverty and isolated residents, either socially, economically, ethnically or all of the above. This paper investigates the demolition of public housing in the US through HOPE VI grants, and the rebuilding of mixed-use neighborhoods. Based on site visits, visual documentation, interviews, and analysis of documents and other reports, as well as scientific articles, this paper uses a qualitative mixed-methods approach to the analysis. It examines project sites in three US cities to see if the Sustainable Urbanist paradigm offers an alternative to the failed suburban-alienated type of living in major European cities. Applying Sustainable Urbanism concepts to European housing areas could be a way forward, where the papers expressing some ideas towards the complex issue of analyzing and coming up with solutions for re-urban renewal of isolated and distressed European cities housing areas. The paper then proposes a meaningful set of strategies based on the Futurescape method. The paper concludes with a concentrated and constructive critique of HOPE VI efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
China: Tsinghua University Press, 2016
Keywords
Sustainable Urbanism, Revitalization, Urban form, Hope VI, social housing
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-249728 (URN)
Note

QC 20190423

Available from: 2019-04-19 Created: 2019-04-19 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2386-0663

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