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Mehaffy, M. W. & Haas, T. (2023). Introduction: Toward a “Post‐Alexandrian” Agenda. Urban Planning, 8(3), 148-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Toward a “Post‐Alexandrian” Agenda
2023 (English)In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 148-152Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Christopher Alexander, who died in March 2022, was undeniably one of the most influential, if sometimes controversial, urban thinkers of the last half‐century. From Notes on the Synthesis of Form, his first book and Harvard PhD thesis, to the landmark “A City is Not a Tree,” to the classic best‐sellers A Pattern Language and The Timeless Way of Building, to his more difficult and controversial magnum opus, The Nature of Order, Alexander has left a body of work whose breadth and depth is only now coming into view. Yet Alexander’s legacy is also the subject of intense debate and critique within the planning and design fields. This introduction provides an overview of the thematic issue of Urban Planning titled “Assessing the Complex Contributions of Christopher Alexander.” Its purpose is to provide greater clarity on where Alexander’s contribu-tion is substantial, and where there are documented gaps and remaining challenges. Most importantly, the thematic issue aims to identify fruitful avenues for further research and development, taking forward some of the more promising but undeveloped insights of this seminal 20th‐century thinker.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogitatio, 2023
Keywords
Christopher Alexander, harmony‐seeking computations, pattern languages, pattern languages of programming, wiki
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-336792 (URN)10.17645/up.v8i3.7375 (DOI)001058353100001 ()2-s2.0-85168965004 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230920

Available from: 2023-09-20 Created: 2023-09-20 Last updated: 2023-09-22Bibliographically approved
Haas, T. & Olsson, K. (2023). Urban Heritage, Planning and Design and Development. Sustainability, 15(16), Article ID 12359.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Heritage, Planning and Design and Development
2023 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 16, article id 12359Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2023
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-336791 (URN)10.3390/su151612359 (DOI)001056043900001 ()2-s2.0-85169090838 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230920

Available from: 2023-09-20 Created: 2023-09-20 Last updated: 2023-09-26Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, A.-P. & Haas, T. (2022). New urban developments in a heritage area. A case study of Skeppsholmsviken 6 in Stockholm, Sweden. In: A Research Agenda for Urban Tourism: (pp. 143-175). Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New urban developments in a heritage area. A case study of Skeppsholmsviken 6 in Stockholm, Sweden
2022 (English)In: A Research Agenda for Urban Tourism, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2022, p. 143-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A vibrant visitor industry can be a useful indicator of good urban environments. People choose to visit a destination because there is something to see there; there is something worth experiencing. It is well-known that heritage spaces score high on lists of what people enjoy and look for when travelling. Stockholm is no different from other cities in this regard. Some of the most visited destinations in the capital include Gamla Stan (the Old Town) and Djurg√•rden (the Royal National City Park). Both places are the result of hundreds of years of history, careful development and many generations of residents placing their “footprints” on the social milieu of the place; such places cannot easily be replaced or “fast-tracked” into being. In other words, there is an imperative to manage new urban developments in such places carefully, especially since they are often the site of conflicting interests. To better understand the challenges this imperative might place on planning practices, this case study follows the planning process of a plot located on Djurg√•rden in Stockholm. The case study will observe that conflicting interests and values between residents, urban heritage professionals and private corporate actors - with regards to how such a plot should be allowed to develop - highlight the complicated nature of planning in heritage areas. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 2022
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-323850 (URN)2-s2.0-85130113606 (Scopus ID)
Note

Part of book: ISBN 9781789907407, QC 20230221

Available from: 2023-02-21 Created: 2023-02-21 Last updated: 2023-02-21Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, A.-P. & Haas, T. (2022). New urban developments in heritage areas: Evidence for making tourism part of urban planning (1ed.). In: Jan van der Borg (Ed.), A Research agenda for Urban Tourism: . Northhampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New urban developments in heritage areas: Evidence for making tourism part of urban planning
2022 (English)In: A Research agenda for Urban Tourism / [ed] Jan van der Borg, Northhampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2022, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A vibrant visitor industry can be a useful indicator of good urban environments. People choose to visit a destination because there is something to see there; there is something worth experiencing. Among popular destinations spaces of heritage score high on lists of what people enjoy and look for when travelling. Stockholm is no different from other cities in this regard. Some of the most visited destinations in the capital include Gamla Stan (Old Town) and Djurgården (Royal National City Park). Both places are the result of hundreds of years of history, careful development and many generations of residents placing their ‘foot prints’ on the social milieu of the place. Such places cannot easily be replaced or ‘fast-tracked’ into being. In other words, there is an imperative to manage new urban developments in such places carefully. Ironically, the popularity of such places can make this all the more difficult. Attractive places can end up ‘cursed’ by their own ‘attractiveness’, that turns them into battle grounds for conflicting interests between, for example, residents, developers and visitor industry actors. To better understand the challenges this might place on planning practices, this case study follows the planning process of a plot located on Djurgården in Stockholm. The case study will observe that conflicting interests and values between residents, urban heritage professionals, and private corporate actors - with regards to how such a plot should be allowed to develop - highlight the complicated nature of planning in heritage areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Northhampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2022 Edition: 1
Keywords
Public space, sustainable tourism, planning, new urban development, heritage
National Category
Social Sciences Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-319640 (URN)10.4337/9781789907407.00015 (DOI)
Note

QC 20221011

Available from: 2022-10-04 Created: 2022-10-04 Last updated: 2024-03-18Bibliographically approved
Gabauer, A., Knierbein, S., Cohen, N., Lebuhn, H., Trogal, K., Viderman, T. & Haas, T. (2021). Care and the City: Encounters with Urban Studies. Informa UK Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Care and the City: Encounters with Urban Studies
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2021 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Care and the City is a cross-disciplinary collection of chapters examining urban social spaces, in which caring and uncaring practices intersect and shape people’s everyday lives. While asking how care and uncare are embedded in the urban condition, the book focuses on inequalities in caring relations and the ways they are acknowledged, reproduced, and overcome in various spaces, discourses, and practices. This book provides a pathway for urban scholars to start engaging with approaches to conceptualize care in the city through a critical-reflexive analysis of processes of urbanization. It pursues a systematic integration of empirical, methodological, theoretical, and ethical approaches to care in urban studies, while overcoming a crisis-centered reading of care and the related ambivalences in care debates, practices, and spaces. These strands are elaborated via a conceptual framework of care and situated within broader theoretical debates on cities, urbanization, and urban development with detailed case studies from Europe, the Americas, and Asia. By establishing links to various fields of knowledge, this book seeks to systematically introduce debates on care to the interconnecting fields of urban studies, planning theory, and related disciplines for the first time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa UK Limited, 2021. p. 254
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-329155 (URN)10.4324/9781003031536 (DOI)2-s2.0-85136738081 (Scopus ID)9781000504903 (ISBN)9780367468583 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20230614

Available from: 2023-06-15 Created: 2023-06-15 Last updated: 2023-07-23Bibliographically approved
Karimnia, E. & Haas, T. (2020). Appropriation of Public Space: A dialectical approach in designing publicness. In: Vikas Mehta and Danilo Palazzo (Ed.), Companion to Public Space: . Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Appropriation of Public Space: A dialectical approach in designing publicness
2020 (English)In: Companion to Public Space / [ed] Vikas Mehta and Danilo Palazzo, Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Publicness is a crucial concept in urban design practice that provides a critical though constructive backdrop to approaches and strategies that go beyond simply designing ‘public space.’ Planning and building public spaces are among the objectives of urban design projects, while the publicness of spaces is shaped as the aftermath of larger development strategies. Over the last decade, we have witnessed the socio-cultural potential of public spaces through tremendous efforts by activists, practitioners as well as scholars. Scholarly research (mainly in the social sciences) has addressed the multidimensionality and complexity of the publicness of urban spaces, questioning the production of pseudo-public places as an urban design outcome. Addressing the question ‘Whose public space?’ casts a negative light on urban design practice for its contribution to systematic exclusions from public spaces (Madanipour 1995, 2010). The publicness of urban spaces is subject to change through the everyday spatial practices that reflect the importance of expanding the notion of ‘design’ as a process, and embracing the multiplicity of spaces, actors/actions as well as unintended consequences as a driving force in the design process.

In this chapter, we intend to build a deeper understanding of the challenges embedded in spatial production process, and in the required shift in urban design practice when designing publicness. We argue that producing publicness is not a linear process of applying experts’ knowledge and approaches conceived in a positivist mode. Publicness is in fact not an outcome of any specific stage of the urban design process; rather, publicness emerges out of a series of purposeful strategies and actions enabled or delimited by public spaces in everyday practice.

The potentials of public space, as infrastructure for social activities, cultural production, and political expression, have been highlighted, specifically over the last decade, in various academic conferences, educational programs, and even policy-making platforms. However, we still lack multi-disciplinary knowledge of these potentials in and for practice (Carmona 2014). A dialectical approach suggests that urban design knowledge can evolve through practice: applying the knowledges of everyday practices, such as the way public space is appropriated, lets urban designers redefine the problems encountered in both practice and design (Inam 2011). Appropriations reveal that public space is a medium and a catalyst where various actors, together with their aspirations, needs, and conflicts, participate in producing publicness.

This chapter concerns the complex processes of producing publicness. The first argument of this chapter concerns how publicness as an abstract ‘intention’ is translated through urban development processes. We discuss the limitations of spatial production, which is usually driven by political and economic intentions and territorial strategies and is known as the intention–outcome gap in urban design. Urban design is often subject to criticism for the gap (Foroughmand Araabi 2017; 2018) arising from the antithesis between a substantive–descriptive understanding of publicness and a normative–prescriptive design of public spaces, with urban design traditionally considered responsible for the latter (Moudon 1992). This argument calls for a deeper understanding of the contribution of practice to capital creation (i.e. neoliberal practices of urban design).

The second argument highlights the appropriations by which space becomes public in action, and the sets of efforts by those whose regular presence, togetherness, and encounters contest the intended publicness. Appropriation is discussed in light of Lefebvre’s concept of ‘trial by space,’ to address everyone’s right and intention to practice their being in space, resulting in levels of territorial adaptation and domination that accordingly transform the publicness of space. The third argument of this chapter treats the implications of appropriations as creative conflicts that can identify and challenge the assumptions of urban design practice. Such an approach recommends a multi-scale and consequence-based framework for designing not only space but also the conditions under which publicness emerges. This represents a shift towards creative urban practices going beyond publicness as intention and public space as outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2020
Keywords
Appropriation, Urban Design, Publicness, Public Space
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-290790 (URN)10.4324/9781351002189-4 (DOI)2-s2.0-85122775538 (Scopus ID)
Note

ISBN 9781138549722, QC 20210223

Available from: 2021-02-22 Created: 2021-02-22 Last updated: 2023-07-04Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, C., Westlund, H. & Haas, T. (2020). Innovative transformations of global city regions in the post-urban world. In: Urban Empires: Cities as Global Rulers in the New Urban World (pp. 257-274). Taylor and Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovative transformations of global city regions in the post-urban world
2020 (English)In: Urban Empires: Cities as Global Rulers in the New Urban World, Taylor and Francis , 2020, p. 257-274Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis, 2020
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-284954 (URN)2-s2.0-85090955724 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20201216

Available from: 2020-12-16 Created: 2020-12-16 Last updated: 2023-03-30Bibliographically approved
Mehaffy, M. W. & Haas, T. (2020). New Urbanism in the New Urban Agenda: Threads of an Unfinished Reformation. Urban Planning, 5(4), 441-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Urbanism in the New Urban Agenda: Threads of an Unfinished Reformation
2020 (English)In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 441-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present evidence that New Urbanism, defined as a set of normative urban characteristics codified in the 1996 Charter of the New Urbanism, reached a seminal moment-in mission if not in name-with the 2016 New Urban Agenda, a landmark document adopted by acclamation by all 193 member states of the United Nations. We compare the two documents and find key parallels between them (including mix of uses, walkable multi-modal streets, buildings defining public space, mix of building ages and heritage patterns, co-production of the city by the citizens, and understanding of the city as an evolutionary self-organizing structure). Both documents also reveal striking contrasts with the highly influential 20th century Athens Charter, from 1933, developed by the Congres Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne. Yet, both newer documents also still face formidable barriers to implementation, and, as we argue, each faces similar challenges in formulating effective alternatives to business as usual. We trace this history up to the present day, and the necessary requirements for what we conclude is an `unfinished reformation' ahead.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COGITATIO PRESS, 2020
Keywords
Athens Charter, Charter of the New Urbanism, New Urban Agenda, new urbanism, sustainable urbanism
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-292711 (URN)10.17645/up.v5i4.3371 (DOI)000620652900006 ()2-s2.0-85099311364 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20210414

Available from: 2021-04-14 Created: 2021-04-14 Last updated: 2022-10-24Bibliographically approved
Kickert, C., vom Hofe, R., Haas, T., Zhang, W. & Mahato, B. (2020). Spatial dynamics of long-term urban retail decline in three transatlantic cities. Cities, 107, Article ID 102918.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial dynamics of long-term urban retail decline in three transatlantic cities
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2020 (English)In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 107, article id 102918Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper studies the effects of the centrality, connectivity and agglomeration of retail establishments on their long-term viability in three cities in the United States, United Kingdom and The Netherlands. As retail is declining in all three markets, there is a dearth of knowledge on the spatial patterns of this decline. This obstructs the substantiation of development decisions and public policy on urban retail retention and growth. Without knowing where stores are most at risk of closing, where can we decide to invest or divest? This paper uses a self-built dataset of store locations and store closures over the span of more than a century in the urban cores of Detroit, Michigan; Birmingham, England; and The Hague, The Netherlands. While taking different paths, all three cities have experienced significant retail decline over the past century. The probability of store closure over time is compared to the metric distance of stores to the retail center of gravity (centrality), store location along well-used streets as measured by their Choice value (connectivity), and the number of surrounding stores (agglomeration). These three comparisons are statistically analyzed using simple line regression, panel regression, and spatial autoregressive probit models. Across these models, store closure is most significantly affected by agglomeration, then by centrality, followed by connectivity. The significance of all three measures is strongest in The Hague, followed by Birmingham and Detroit – two cities that experienced large-scale urban renewal and socio-economic decline.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2020
Keywords
Downtown, Retail, Space syntax, Spatial econometrics, Urban retail
National Category
Business Administration Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-287907 (URN)10.1016/j.cities.2020.102918 (DOI)000594762900005 ()32921867 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85090272645 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20201230

Available from: 2020-12-30 Created: 2020-12-30 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Jing, J., Canter, D. & Haas, T. (2019). Conceptualizing Public Space Using a Multiple Sorting Task–Exploring the Links between Loneliness and Public Space. Urban Science, 3(4), 1-22, Article ID 107.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptualizing Public Space Using a Multiple Sorting Task–Exploring the Links between Loneliness and Public Space
2019 (English)In: Urban Science, ISSN 2413-8851, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 1-22, article id 107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study tests the viability of multiple sorting tasks (MST) as a method to explore perceptions of public space and its potential for people that are vulnerable to loneliness. The procedure integrates qualitative and quantitative aspects and obviates the challenge of people articulating how they interact with their surroundings, especially being aware of what features of their environment are influencing them. Two samples, each with six participants of varying ages and backgrounds, viewed 20 photographs of public spaces in Stockholm. They sorted these into categories based upon the activities they anticipated would occur there. Within each sample, a multidimensional scaling procedure was used to reveal the underlying structure across the combination of the six responses. The results showed coherent structures with interesting variations between people. A set of general multi-purpose places are identified, with others being differentiated in terms of whether they were ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ and ‘open’ or ‘enclosed’. The study also found that people conceptualized public space differently when loneliness was the focus during the sorting process. An assemblage of public spaces relevant for loneliness is also illustrated. This demonstrates the utility of the MST and provides theoretical and practical implications for urban planning and design that addresses loneliness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
public space; multiple sorting task; loneliness; social interaction; theory of place; environmental probabilism; urban planning; urban design
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Research subject
Architecture, Urban Design; Planning and Decision Analysis, Urban and Regional Studies; Planning and Decision Analysis, Strategies for sustainable development; Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326927 (URN)10.3390/urbansci3040107 (DOI)000621639500007 ()2-s2.0-85150646913 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230516

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-05-16Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2386-0663

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