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Publications (10 of 81) Show all publications
Danenberg, R. & Haas, T. (2018). New trends in bottom-up urbanism and governance-reformulating ways for mutual engagement between municipalities and citizen-led urban initiatives. In: The Palgrave Handbook of Bottom-Up Urbanism: (pp. 113-129). Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New trends in bottom-up urbanism and governance-reformulating ways for mutual engagement between municipalities and citizen-led urban initiatives
2018 (English)In: The Palgrave Handbook of Bottom-Up Urbanism, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 113-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter addresses how bottom-up urbanism relates to urban governance in Europe. The recent proliferation of bottom-up urban initiatives contrasts with the conventional system of top-down planning. This chapter includes eight examples of bottom-up initiatives from Stockholm, Sweden, and Istanbul, Turkey. Three conclusions can be drawn: first, the discrepancy between organizational structures, a hierarchical governmental structure, and the dominance of politics create missing links in the relationship between municipalities and citizen-led urban initiatives; second, new governance arrangements alone are not enough to create opportunities for citizens to partake in participatory methods and to be involved in decision-making processes; third, the political perspective of social innovation reformulates mutual engagement by introducing political liaisons, such as municipal guides or neighborhood councils.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing, 2018
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236275 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-90131-2_8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85053746218 (Scopus ID)9783319901312 (ISBN)9783319901305 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20181029

Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Haas, T. (2016). Beyond the sustainable urban design roadmaps. Journal of Urban Design, 21(1), 38-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond the sustainable urban design roadmaps
2016 (English)In: Journal of Urban Design, ISSN 1357-4809, E-ISSN 1469-9664, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 38-40Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-185392 (URN)10.1080/13574809.2016.1114716 (DOI)000372552000007 ()2-s2.0-84956777125 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160418

Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
D'Acci, L., Haas, T. & Bardhan, R. (2016). Inaugural Editorial of Urban Planning. URBAN PLANNING, 1(1), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inaugural Editorial of Urban Planning
2016 (English)In: URBAN PLANNING, ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

This editorial is the introductory piece of Urban Planning, a new international peer-reviewed open access journal of urban studies aimed at advancing understanding of and ideas about humankind's habitats in order to promote progress and quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COGITATIO PRESS, 2016
Keywords
future cities, progress, urban forms, urban planning
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214923 (URN)10.17645/up.v1i1.586 (DOI)000408825000001 ()2-s2.0-85044459647 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 2017-09-25

Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Vranic, P., Vasilevska, L. & Haas, T. (2015). Hybrid spatialities: Multi-storey extensions of socialist blocks of flats under post-socialist transition in Serbia, the case of Nis. Urban Studies, 53(6), 1261-1277
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hybrid spatialities: Multi-storey extensions of socialist blocks of flats under post-socialist transition in Serbia, the case of Nis
2015 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 1261-1277Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this research is to study the emergence and evolution of the multi-storey extension (MSE) of socialist blocks of flats in the form of additional storeys or lofts on top of host buildings, which is seen as a dominant model of post-socialist spatial change in inherited multi-storey housing areas in Serbia. Relying on an analysis of empirical data sources, interviews, observation and a comparative analysis, the paper investigates the MSE as a predominantly self-organising process. It also considers its manifestations at different operational and spatial levels in the study area of the city of Nis. It is argued that the MSE, under conditions of low economic capacity, an indifferent attitude of local authorities, an inconsistent legislative environment, and the market as an essential driving force of the process, results in uneven urban transformations, both in physical and social terms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Urban Studies Journal Limited, 2015
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-165795 (URN)10.1177/0042098015571887 (DOI)000373700400015 ()2-s2.0-84962145335 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150505

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Littke, H., Locke, R. & Haas, T. (2015). Taking the High Line: elevated parks, transforming neighbourhoods, and the ever-changing relationship between the urban and nature. Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking the High Line: elevated parks, transforming neighbourhoods, and the ever-changing relationship between the urban and nature
2015 (English)In: Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability, ISSN 1754-9175, E-ISSN 1754-9183Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The popularity and impact of the High Line in New York mirrors the complex reality of contemporary provision of public space. The development of the project, its relationship to its surroundings and the evolving trend of elevated parks are analyzed in relation to the role of urban green space and impacts of Landscape Urbanism. The High Line shows the way to a new role for urban green space by utilizing abandoned infrastructure. In analysing the narrative of the High Line, this article stresses the importance of understanding localities and connectivity. Based on observations as well as a review of the literature and media, the article concludes that great landscaping does not create great places without careful consideration of the surrounding community and residents.

Keywords
elevated parks, environmental gentrification, High Line, Landscape Urbanism, urban parks
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-175627 (URN)10.1080/17549175.2015.1063532 (DOI)
Note

QC 20151027

Available from: 2015-10-27 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Haas, T. & Jing, J. (2015). The Built Environment for Children: Stockholm Experience. In: : . Paper presented at 52nd International Making Cities Livable Conference on Achieving Green, Healthy Cities in Bristol, UK, June 29 – July 3, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Built Environment for Children: Stockholm Experience
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The enjoyment of, and impact on children from the built environment is a very significant aspect of “social sustainability”, but it is relatively underrepresented in the discourse on sustainable development. Despite significant advancements in the understanding of the relationship between the built environment and child health and development made over the past several decades, many argue that contemporary urban (and sub-urban) environments in developed countries are having negative repercussions on child health and development.

 

Stockholm, featuring both advancements as child-friendly city which reflects Sweden’s national branding as “child-friendly” nation (Swedish Institute, 2012) and challenges as to its radical urban transformation which in combination with a relative shortage of housing that places great pressure on city planning. The paper draws importance to the phenomenon of public space regeneration, with particular focus on understanding how public spaces can be built and adapted to provide children with environments that stimulate their social, educational and physical development. The high levels of activities to modify, expand, and build new areas in the city to accommodate more people, including more children, provides a dynamic and robust setting for case study.  This paper reviews the built environment for pre-school aged children (age 0-6) in the city of Stockholm and investigate how planners, architects and designers account for children as users of the spaces and places that they plan and design. A series of case studies on child-friendly design are provided in order to produce learning materials for architects, planners and policy makers based upon the Stockholm experience.

Keywords
Urban Design, Architecture, Cities, Children
National Category
Architecture Design
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-165798 (URN)
Conference
52nd International Making Cities Livable Conference on Achieving Green, Healthy Cities in Bristol, UK, June 29 – July 3, 2015
Note

NV 20150504

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2015-05-04Bibliographically approved
Haas, T. & Krister, O. (Eds.). (2014). Emergent Urbanism: Urban Planning & Design in Times of Structural and Systemic Change (1ed.). London: Ashgate
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emergent Urbanism: Urban Planning & Design in Times of Structural and Systemic Change
2014 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Ashgate, 2014. p. 185 Edition: 1
Keywords
Urbanism, Planning, Theory, Transformation, Cities, Environment
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Architecture; Economics; History of Science, Technology and Environment; Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-165793 (URN)978-1-4094-5727-5 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20150504

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Ejigu, A. G. & Haas, T. (2014). Sustainable urbanism: Moving past Neo-Modernist & Neo-Traditionalist housing strategies. Open House International, 39(1), 5-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable urbanism: Moving past Neo-Modernist & Neo-Traditionalist housing strategies
2014 (English)In: Open House International, ISSN 0168-2601, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 5-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The growing alienation of modernist public housing estates and their ethnically and socially excluded residents, as well as the neglected human potential-capital they symbolize (not social burden), is a grotesque expression of the failure of a system driven by the profit motive and failed housing, planning and social policy, rather than by the requirement to satisfy sustainable urbanism and dignified and just housing for all. The modernist concept of architecture & urban planning, which emerged in response to a very particular set of regional circumstance, spread throughout the world in the 20th century. The result, where the idea was simplistically accepted, had disastrous consequences. The postmodernist approach on the other hand has given up altogether on the social agenda of architecture and housing. Paying particular attention to housing, this paper discusses the contrasting results of modernist and –or post modernist planning approaches in housing and its consequences. It also looks at the rather recent Sustainable Urbanism paradigm and the possibility that it might offer as an alternative or a new complement to housing planning and design; this in contrast to the modernist satellite-suburban generic type of living in most major European cities as well as in the developing countries. The study is based on multiple methods which include, descriptive and exploratory qualitative approach (observation, introspection, analysis and deduction), as well as Futurescape Method of selected cases in the American Housing Program HOPE VI, and from ethnographic survey of an ongoing large scale housing program in Ethiopia known as Integrated Housing Development Program (IHDP).Keywords: Sustainable Urbanism, Modernism, Hope VI, Integrated Housing Development Program, IHDP.

Keywords
Sustainable Urbanism, Modernism, Hope VI, Integrated Housing Development Program, IHDP
National Category
Architecture Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-124387 (URN)000337994100002 ()2-s2.0-84899993516 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150623

Available from: 2013-07-01 Created: 2013-07-01 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Haas, T. & Olsson, K. (2014). Transmutation and reinvention of public spaces through ideals of urban planning and design. Space and Culture, 17(1), 59-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transmutation and reinvention of public spaces through ideals of urban planning and design
2014 (English)In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our cities are undergoing a rapid transformation of public spaces due to different factors, such as economic and cultural globalization, demographic transformations, marketing strategies, urban planning and design approaches, medialization reinterpretations, social networks, and others. The urban realm itself is the collection of public spaces and places - buildings, squares, streets, landscapes, and ecosystems, as well as processes, mindscapes, and people that make up and shape any environment. In that respect, urban planning and design is really characterized by two distinct processes that transubstantiate space and place: static and dynamic. This qualitative, reflective article discusses these issues, taking a standpoint from the notion of public space as a common good. This notion is discussed in relation to the factors that transform our cities and is analyzed in relation to the concept of public good. We reflect this discussion vis-à-vis the views of the leading paradigms in urban planning and design, and their intake on and outlook on these complex issues.

Keywords
public good, public space, urban planning and design, urbanism paradigms
National Category
Architecture Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-142988 (URN)10.1177/1206331213493855 (DOI)000337343000005 ()2-s2.0-84892385817 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20140314

Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Mehaffy, M., Haas, T. & Van Den Dobbelsteen, A. (2014). Unpacking Density: Exploiting Urban Design Variables in Carbon Reduction Strategies. Nordic Journal of Architectural Research, 26(2), 9-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unpacking Density: Exploiting Urban Design Variables in Carbon Reduction Strategies
2014 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Architectural Research, ISSN 1893-5281, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 9-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has indicated a consistent association between higher residential density (expressed per capita) and lower energy use and greenhouse gas emissions (also expressed per capita) when other factors are held equal. However, the factors contributing to the benefits of density, and the ways they interact, are less well understood. In this paper we examine three such factors: the distribution of destinations, the provision of viable pedestrian-based multi-modal pathways, and, least understood but perhaps most intriguing, the «network effects» that appear to arise from the structural dynamics of certain features of urban networks. We present the case that these factors can be exploited by urban designers as variable elements within design, as part of a strategy to achieve ambitious carbon reduction goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
sintef akademisk forlag, 2014
Keywords
Density, Urban Design, Planning, Environment
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Architecture; Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-165792 (URN)
Note

QC 20150505

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2386-0663

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