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Zapico, J. L., Katzeff, C., Bohne, U. & Milestad, R. (2016). Eco-feedback Visualization for Closing the Gap of Organic Food Consumption. In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NORDICHI '16: THE 9TH NORDIC CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION - GAME CHANGING DESIGN. Paper presented at 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (NordiCHI), OCT 23-27, 2016, Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept of Appl Informat Technol, Gothenburg, SWEDEN. Association for Computing Machinery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eco-feedback Visualization for Closing the Gap of Organic Food Consumption
2016 (English)In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NORDICHI '16: THE 9TH NORDIC CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION - GAME CHANGING DESIGN, Association for Computing Machinery , 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the results of EcoPanel, an eco-feedback visualization created in collaboration with a Swedish food retailer. The visualization uses automatic data gathering to provide consumers with detailed information and long-term trends about their organic food consumption. The results from a five months test with 65 users show an increase in organic purchases compared to the control group, especially for the users who overestimated their percentage of organic food before the test. From the results we point out the possibilities of using visualization as a way of creating insight on behaviors such as food consumption, that are difficult to grasp from individual actions. This insight can be a way of closing the gap between attitudes and actual behavior, helping users that are already aware and willing to change, to perform more sustainable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, 2016
Keywords
Sustainable HCI, food, sustainability, visualization, eco-feedback
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-199823 (URN)10.1145/2971485.2971507 (DOI)000390298600075 ()2-s2.0-84997426786 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4763-1 (ISBN)
Conference
9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (NordiCHI), OCT 23-27, 2016, Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept of Appl Informat Technol, Gothenburg, SWEDEN
Note

QC 20170116

Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
von Oelreich, J. & Milestad, R. (2016). Sustainability transformations in the balance: exploring Swedish initiatives challenging the corporate food regime. European Planning Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainability transformations in the balance: exploring Swedish initiatives challenging the corporate food regime
2016 (English)In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores to what extent organic initiatives that go beyond mainstream organic (so-called Organic 3.0) can challenge the corporate food regime and how they can push the food system towards sustainability transformations. We depart from the assumption that individual initiatives may differ in their potential to influence the corporate food regime and that this potential can be assessed by examining traits linked to reformist, progressive or radical food regime/food movement trends that they may possess. Rather than establishing a dichotomy between niche and food regime or categorising Organic 3.0 initiatives within one of these trends, we explore the nuances in niche-regime relationships within the food system from a multi-level perspective, using the cases of two Organic 3.0 initiatives in Sweden. The results show that relations between these initiatives and the food regime share key characteristics, but also differ in important respects. While a reformist strategy facilitates niche growth, progressive and radical approaches are more likely to challenge the regime. The choice of approach in both cases involves trade-offs between growth and organic values. We conclude that one of the primary roles of Organic 3.0 initiatives may be to illustrate the viability of alternative models.

Keywords
Organic 3.0 initiatives, food regimes, sustainable food systems, sustainability transformations, multi-level perspective (MLP), Sweden
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-203336 (URN)10.1080/09654313.2016.1270908 (DOI)000402629300003 ()
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme
Note

QC 20170508

Available from: 2017-03-15 Created: 2017-03-15 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Milestad, R., Hahn, T. & von Oelreich, J. (2016). The resilience of a sustainability entrepreneur in the Swedish food system. Sustainability, 8(6), Article ID 550.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The resilience of a sustainability entrepreneur in the Swedish food system
2016 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organizational resilience emphasizes the adaptive capacity for renewal after crisis. This paperexplores the resilience of a business with both a social and an environmental orientation—a not-forprofitbusiness that claims to contribute to sustainable development of the food system. We ask whatconstitutes social and sustainable entrepreneurship in this case, and discuss determinants of theresilience of the business. The business, Biodynamiska Produkter (BP), has experienced periods ofgrowth, conservation, and rapid decline in demand, followed by periods of re-organization. Our resultssuggest that BP, with its social mission and focus on organic food, meets the criteria of both a socialand sustainability entrepreneurship organization. Two major crises in the late 1980s and late 1990swere met by re-organization and novel market innovations. Other criteria for resilience, met by BP,include flexibility, high level of trust, authentic value-based leadership promoting experimentation andadaptability, and a long-term authentic local trade-mark supporting customer loyalty. BP has beeneconomically resilient but not thriving. Controlling the value chain and following the social andenvironmental objectives were given higher priority than expanding its operations. In 2003 BPlaunched a box scheme and after its crisis in 2008/2009 focused on consolidation rather than newinnovations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2016
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-187467 (URN)10.3390/su8060550 (DOI)000378776800047 ()2-s2.0-84976314655 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160524

Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2018-02-08Bibliographically approved
von Oelreich, J. & Milestad, R. (2015). Transformations towards resilience within the food system: scaling up two organic food value chains in Sweden. In: Sutherland, L.-A. et al. (Ed.), Proceedings of the XXVI Congress. Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World: . Paper presented at XXVI European Society for Rural Sociology Congress, 18-21 August 2015, Aberdeen, Scotland (pp. 201-202). Aberdeen: James Hutton Institute
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transformations towards resilience within the food system: scaling up two organic food value chains in Sweden
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the XXVI Congress. Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World / [ed] Sutherland, L.-A. et al., Aberdeen: James Hutton Institute , 2015, p. 201-202Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

One way to build resilience of the food system may be to scale up organic food initiatives. This paper discusses two organic food initiatives in Sweden, exploring challenges and opportunities for a double scaling up of volumes and values. Two different approaches, "reformist" and "progressive", are explored. The paper concludes that the two approaches demand sustaining and building resilience in different ways and at multiple scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aberdeen: James Hutton Institute, 2015
Keywords
Transformations, resilience, food systems, organic food
National Category
Sociology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Human Geography Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-183282 (URN)978-0-902701-14-4 (ISBN)
Conference
XXVI European Society for Rural Sociology Congress, 18-21 August 2015, Aberdeen, Scotland
Note

QC 20160307

Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Jaklin, U., Kummer, S. & Milestad, R. (2015). Why do farmers collaborate with a food cooperative?: Reasons for participating in a civic food network in Vienna, Austria. International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food, 22(1), 41-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why do farmers collaborate with a food cooperative?: Reasons for participating in a civic food network in Vienna, Austria
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food, ISSN 0798-1759, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 41-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food cooperatives can be qualified as a civic food network as they can create more embedded market relations between consumers and farmers and increase knowledge about food consumption. In this study, we explore why farmers collaborated with the consumer-initiated food co-op D’Speis in Vienna, and assess the food co-op’s potential to support a peasant mode of farming. Farmers and working members of the food co-op were interviewed. As the food co-op selected their suppliers depending on their production methods, i.e. small-scale and organic farming, all farmers showed some elements of peasant farming. The interaction between farmers and co-op members, especially regarding price negotiations and quality standards, provided farmers with more room to manoeuvre. As the food co-op’s contribution to farmers’ incomes was negligible, the food co-op mainly supported peasant farming in the sphere of social and cultural capital. However, the degree of collaboration differed substantially as more peasant farmers interacted more closely with the food co-op. The farmers and co-op members shared their criticism of the hegemonic food system, but on the other hand missed clear common goals. Both farmers and food co-op members regarded their practices as political acts for a different food system. Values deduced from these practices point towards food sovereignty, which could serve as a compass for common political actions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cardiff University; Florida Atlantic University, 2015
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-183241 (URN)
Note

QC 20160303

Available from: 2016-03-03 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Rist, L., Felton, A., Nyström, M., Troell, M., Sponseller, R. A., Bengtsson, J., . . . Moen, J. (2014). Applying resilience thinking to production ecosystems. Ecosphere, 5(6), 73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying resilience thinking to production ecosystems
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2014 (English)In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 73-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Production ecosystems typically have a high dependence on supporting and regulating ecosystem services and while they have thus far managed to sustain production, this has often been at the cost of externalities imposed on other systems and locations. One of the largest challenges facing humanity is to secure the production of food and fiber while avoiding long-term negative impacts on ecosystems and the range of services that they provide. Resilience has been used as a framework for understanding sustainability challenges in a range of ecosystem types, but has not been systematically applied across the range of systems specifically used for the production of food and fiber in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. This paper applied a resilience lens to production ecosystems in which anthropogenic inputs play varying roles in determining system dynamics and outputs. We argue that the traditional resilience framework requires important additions when applied to production systems. We show how sustained anthropogenic inputs of external resources can lead to a "coercion'' of resilience and describe how the global interconnectedness of many production systems can camouflage signals indicating resilience loss.

Keywords
agriculture, aquaculture, coerced resilience, fisheries, forestry, sustainable development
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-149224 (URN)10.1890/ES13-00330.1 (DOI)000338925000007 ()2-s2.0-84903482318 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20140818

Available from: 2014-08-18 Created: 2014-08-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Milestad, R., Svenfelt, Å. & Dreborg, K. H. (2014). Developing integrated explorative and normative scenarios: The case of future land use in a climate-neutral Sweden. Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, 60, 59-71
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing integrated explorative and normative scenarios: The case of future land use in a climate-neutral Sweden
2014 (English)In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 60, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transition from the current oil-based world economy to an economy based on renewable resources can become a strong driving force for land use change. This paper describes the development of integrated explorative and normative scenarios for the analysis of future land use in a climate-neutral Sweden. The aim is to show how backcasting scenarios fulfilling far-reaching greenhouse gas reduction targets can be related to assumptions on possible external developments, in order to contribute to the discussion on future sustainable land use. A target-fulfilling scenario element was combined with an external scenario element, i.e. developments that cannot be influenced by the targeted actors. The scenarios were developed and analysed in collaboration with local actors. Four scenarios were used to describe how land in Sweden could be used when Sweden has achieved zero emissions of greenhouse gases in 2060. The explorative dimension stretched from a situation where there is no international climate agreement to one where there is an international agreement on reducing greenhouse gases. The backcasting dimension illustrated different strategies to achieve the target and stretches from a very influential municipal level to one where the national/EU level is most influential.

Keywords
Participatory backcasting, Land use, Climate change, Contextual scenario element, Normative scenario element, Sweden
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-148603 (URN)10.1016/j.futures.2014.04.015 (DOI)000338616400006 ()2-s2.0-84901937212 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20140812

Available from: 2014-08-12 Created: 2014-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Marquardt, K., Milestad, R. & Porro, R. (2013). Farmers' Perspectives on Vital Soil-related Ecosystem Services in Intensive Swidden Farming Systems in the Peruvian Amazon. Human Ecology, 41(1), 139-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Farmers' Perspectives on Vital Soil-related Ecosystem Services in Intensive Swidden Farming Systems in the Peruvian Amazon
2013 (English)In: Human Ecology, ISSN 0300-7839, E-ISSN 1572-9915, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 139-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A growing dilemma is how to conserve Amazonian forest while allowing local people to secure their livelihoods. Small-scale swidden farming in Amazonia is entirely dependent on the continued provision of ecosystem services (ES) that generate the conditions for agriculture. This study identified soil-related ES needed for, and enhanced by, productive swidden systems from the farmer's perspective. Workshops in six farming communities in northeastern Peru discussed various land uses, swidden systems that continue to be productive, and swidden systems on degraded land. The participating farmers noted changes in their production systems and described the ES (or lack thereof) in terms of soil quality, crop production quantity and quality, burning practices, forest regeneration, and farming skill. The central elements described in farmers' own strategies for managing soil-related ES were fallow management for biomass production and crop diversity, factors identified as central to future ES management work in established agricultural areas in Amazonia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
Diversity, Fallow management, Land use, Peruvian Amazon, Small-scale farming, Subsistence production
National Category
Agricultural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-143668 (URN)10.1007/s10745-012-9522-3 (DOI)000314718800011 ()
Note

QC 20140613

Available from: 2014-03-26 Created: 2014-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Marquardt, K., Milestad, R. & Salomonsson, L. (2013). Improved fallows: A case study of an adaptive response in Amazonian swidden farming systems. Agriculture and Human Values (30), 417-428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved fallows: A case study of an adaptive response in Amazonian swidden farming systems
2013 (English)In: Agriculture and Human Values, ISSN 0889-048X, E-ISSN 1572-8366, no 30, p. 417-428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many smallholders in the Amazon employ swidden (slash-and-burn) farming systems in which forest or forest fallows are the primary source of natural soil enrichment. With decreasing opportunities to claim natural forests for agriculture and shrinking landholdings, rotational agriculture on smaller holdings allows insufficient time for fallow to regenerate naturally into secondary forest. This case study examines how Peruvian farmers use "improved fallows" as an adaptive response to a situation of decreasing soil fertility and how the farmers describe the rationale underlying the various actions taken in these modified fallow systems. The results indicate that farmers establish improved fallows using contextual ecological knowledge and various techniques to introduce a large diversity of tree species. This practice is also used to restore degraded land to agricultural production. The tasks of maintaining productivity on agricultural land and reforesting degraded areas is becoming increasingly urgent in the Amazon, making agricultural practices that involve reforestation and tree management highly relevant. Since swidden farming systems are the basis for the livelihoods of most Amazon smallholders, good farming practices elaborated by swidden farmers are important for sustainable small-scale family farming systems in the Amazon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
Fallow management, Diversity management, Amazon, Farmer practice, Ecosystem services, Peru
National Category
Agricultural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-143667 (URN)10.1007/s10460-012-9415-5 (DOI)000323223100009 ()
Note

QC 20140613

Available from: 2014-03-26 Created: 2014-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Kummer, S., Milestad, R., Leitgeb, F. & Vogl, C. (2012). Building Resilience through Farmers’ Experiments in Organic Agriculture: Examples from Eastern Austria. Sustainable Agriculture Research, 1(2), 308-321
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Resilience through Farmers’ Experiments in Organic Agriculture: Examples from Eastern Austria
2012 (English)In: Sustainable Agriculture Research, ISSN 1927-050X, E-ISSN 1927-0518, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 308-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Farmers have always lived in changing environments where uncertainty and disturbances are inevitable. Therefore, farmers need the ability to adapt to change in order to be able to maintain their farms. Experimentation is one way for farmers to learn and adapt, and may be a tool to build farm resilience. Farmers’ experiments as defined in this paper are activities where something totally or partially new is introduced at the farm and the feasibility of this introduction is evaluated. The theoretical framework applied to study farmers’ experiments is the concept of resilience. Resilience is the capacity of social-ecological systems to cope with change, and is a framework used to assess complex systems of interactions between humans and ecosystems.

This paper explores to which extent farmers’ experimentation can help build farm resilience. In addition to arguments found in the literature, five organic farms in Eastern Austria are used to illustrate this potential. The farmers were interviewed in 2007 and 2008. The respective farmers all worked fulltime on their farms, were between 34 and 55 years old, and owned farms between 15 and 76 ha. These farmers experimented in ways that enhance resilience – at the farm and in the region. The outcome of experiments can be management changes, new insights, or technology that can be passed on and potentially be built into education and advisory institutions. To encourage farmers’ experiments, it is important to develop conditions that support farmers in their experimenting role.

National Category
Agricultural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-143666 (URN)10.5539/sar.v1n2p308 (DOI)
Note

QC 20140919

Available from: 2014-03-26 Created: 2014-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8626-7288

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