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Franzen, F., Strand, Å., Stadmark, J., Ingmansson, I., Thomas, J.-B., Söderqvist, T., . . . Hasselström, L. (2024). Governance hurdles for expansion of low trophic mariculture production in Sweden. Ambio
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governance hurdles for expansion of low trophic mariculture production in Sweden
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2024 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The study examines the governance of low trophic species mariculture (LTM) using Sweden as a case study. LTM, involving species such as seaweeds and mollusks, offers ecosystem services and nutritious foods. Despite its potential to contribute to blue growth and Sustainable Development Goals, LTM development in the EU and OECD countries has stagnated. A framework for mapping governance elements (institutions, structures, and processes) and analyzing governance objective (effective, equitable, responsive, and robust) was combined with surveys addressed to the private entrepreneurs in the sector. Analysis reveals ineffective institutions due to lack of updated legislation and guidance, resulting in ambiguous interpretations. Governance structures include multiple decision-making bodies without a clear coordination agency. Licensing processes were lengthy and costly for the private entrepreneurs, and the outcomes were uncertain. To support Sweden’s blue bioeconomy, LTM governance requires policy integration, clearer direction, coordinated decision-making, and mechanisms for conflict resolution and learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-347611 (URN)10.1007/s13280-024-02033-4 (DOI)001216121500001 ()2-s2.0-85192198108 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

QC 20240613

Available from: 2024-06-12 Created: 2024-06-12 Last updated: 2024-06-13Bibliographically approved
Shahbazi, A., Moeinaddini, M., Abdoli, M. A., Hosseinzadeh, M., Jaafarzadeh, N. & Sinha, R. (2023). Environmental Damage of Different Waste Treatment Scenarios by Considering Avoided Emissions Based on System Dynamics Modeling. Sustainability, 15(23), Article ID 16158.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental Damage of Different Waste Treatment Scenarios by Considering Avoided Emissions Based on System Dynamics Modeling
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2023 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 23, article id 16158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to develop a comprehensive model for life cycle assessment and environmental damage cost calculations considering avoided emissions in different waste management scenarios using the system dynamics (SD) approach. Our analysis reveals that under the business-as-usual (BAU) scenario for the period 2020-2050, the total net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reach 12.5 Mt, with the highest environmental damage cost being USD 689 million. In contrast, an integrated management strategy encompassing recycling, composting, anaerobic digestion, and incineration results in a 195% reduction in net GHG emissions compared to the BAU Scenario. Concurrently, the environmental damage cost drops to USD 277 million, incorporating USD 347 million in savings, leading to a net environmental damage cost of USD -71 million. The findings affirm that accounting for emissions avoided across various treatment methods offers a more accurate estimate of environmental damage costs. Additionally, policies centered on integrated waste management are more likely to achieve sustainability. The study also demonstrates the utility of the SD approach in providing a holistic view of waste management systems and in evaluating the effectiveness of various policy strategies for sustainable waste management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2023
Keywords
waste management scenarios, environmental saving, system dynamics approach, life cycle impact assessment method (LIME), environmental damage cost
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-341557 (URN)10.3390/su152316158 (DOI)001115976900001 ()
Note

QC 20231222

Available from: 2023-12-22 Created: 2023-12-22 Last updated: 2023-12-22Bibliographically approved
Söderqvist, T., Nathaniel, H., Franzén, D., Franzén, F., Hasselström, L., Gröndahl, F., . . . Thomas, J.-B. (2022). Cost–benefit analysis of beach-cast harvest: Closing land-marine nutrient loops in the Baltic Sea region. Ambio, 51(5), 1302-1313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost–benefit analysis of beach-cast harvest: Closing land-marine nutrient loops in the Baltic Sea region
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2022 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 1302-1313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Harvesting beach-cast can help mitigate marine eutrophication by closing land-marine nutrient loops and provide a blue biomass raw material for the bioeconomy. Cost–benefit analysis was applied to harvest activities during 2009–2018 on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, highlighting benefits such as nutrient removal from the marine system and improved recreational opportunities as well as costs of using inputs necessary for harvest. The results indicate that the activities entailed a net gain to society, lending substance to continued funding for harvests on Gotland and assessments of upscaling of harvest activities to other areas in Sweden and elsewhere. The lessons learnt from the considerable harvest experience on Gotland should be utilized for developing concrete guidelines for carrying out sustainable harvest practice, paying due attention to local conditions but also to what can be generalized to a wider national and international context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
Keywords
Beach recreation, Beach wrack, Bioeconomy, Circular economy, Eutrophication, Nutrient loops, biomass, cost-benefit analysis, marine environment, pollutant removal, spatiotemporal analysis, Atlantic Ocean, Baltic Sea, Gotland, Sweden, nitrogen, Baltic States, cost benefit analysis, Nutrients
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-313251 (URN)10.1007/s13280-021-01641-8 (DOI)000719717500001 ()34787831 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85119203226 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220613

Available from: 2022-06-13 Created: 2022-06-13 Last updated: 2023-11-09Bibliographically approved
Henrysson, M., Papageorgiou, A., Björklund, A., Vanhuyse, F. & Sinha, R. (2022). Monitoring progress towards a circular economy in urban areas: An application of the European Union circular economy monitoring framework in Umeå municipality. Sustainable cities and society, 87, 104245-104245, Article ID 104245.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring progress towards a circular economy in urban areas: An application of the European Union circular economy monitoring framework in Umeå municipality
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2022 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 87, p. 104245-104245, article id 104245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As cities worldwide implement strategies to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy (CE), there is an increasing need for tools to monitor progress. However, a standardised metric for CE monitoring in urban areas is lacking. This study examines the potential of the EU Circular Economy Monitoring Framework (CEMF), an established indicator-based framework for measuring national- and EU-level circularity performance, as a monitoring tool for urban areas. For this purpose, available data sources that can support the framework's application at the urban level are mapped, and data quality is assessed following the pedigree matrix approach. Next, the CEMF indicators are computed for the urban area of Umeå, Sweden. The mapping showed limited availability of urban-level data, necessitating the downscaling of national-level data using proxy factors. Most available urban-level data are of high quality, while the quality of national-level data is reduced when used to compute indicators at the urban level. The application of the CEMF in Umeå indicates that there are areas where the municipality performs well, though further improvements are needed. We conclude that the CEMF has potential as a monitoring tool for urban areas. However, improvements in CEMF...s scope and data availability are recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Cities Circularity Indicators Resources Waste Sustainable urban transitions
National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Engineering and Technologies Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis, Environmental Strategic Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-320346 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2022.104245 (DOI)000876395200002 ()2-s2.0-85139840787 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2019–03237
Note

QC 20221205

Available from: 2022-10-19 Created: 2022-10-19 Last updated: 2022-12-05Bibliographically approved
Sinha, R., Thomas, J.-B., Strand, A., Soderqvist, T., Stadmark, J., Franzen, F., . . . Hasselström, L. (2022). Quantifying nutrient recovery by element flow analysis: Harvest and use of seven marine biomasses to close N and P loops. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 178, Article ID 106031.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantifying nutrient recovery by element flow analysis: Harvest and use of seven marine biomasses to close N and P loops
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2022 (English)In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 178, article id 106031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anthropogenic consumption of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) has pushed their respective planetary boundaries beyond a safe operating space causing environmental problems, and simultaneously, the depletion of finite mineral P resources is of growing concern. Previous research has found that marine biomass such as kelp, reed and mussels have a high potential for taking up N and P, which could potentially contribute both to alleviating environmental problems and recirculating P from marine environments back to human consumption systems. This paper thus examines these nutrient flows and the extent to which marine biomass can contribute to close the loop. The study utilizes an element flow analysis (EFA) to establish the mapping of N and P flows and explore plausible scenarios of biomass utilisation by 2030 and 2050 for P loop closure in Sweden. The current uptake of P and N through the seven marine biomass cases (mariculture of mussels on both the Swedish east and west coasts, kelp and ascidians and the harvest of wild oysters, beach-cast and reed) contributes to 1.1% and 0.3% respectively of the full loop closure (relative to 2016 loading). Approximately 22% of the total P (and 23% N) uptake (in the biomasses) is currently being used in products, while the rest remains unused. The plausible future scenario for 2050 expects to contribute to around 10% P and 2.8% N loop closure (relative to 2016) if all nutrients in the uptake are used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2022
Keywords
Element flow analysis, Blue growth, Circular economy, Nutrient recovery, Phosphorus, Nitrogen
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-310589 (URN)10.1016/j.resconrec.2021.106031 (DOI)000767524900013 ()2-s2.0-85119441368 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220405

Available from: 2022-04-05 Created: 2022-04-05 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L. E., Sinha, R., Frostell, B. & Friman, M. (2022). What Can Be Done to Change?—The Environmental and Behavioral Consequences of Interventions for Sustainable Travel. Sustainability, 14(3), Article ID 1345.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Can Be Done to Change?—The Environmental and Behavioral Consequences of Interventions for Sustainable Travel
2022 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 3, article id 1345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2022
National Category
Environmental Sciences Social Work Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-319968 (URN)10.3390/su14031345 (DOI)000916835700001 ()2-s2.0-85123401552 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20221017

Available from: 2022-10-17 Created: 2022-10-17 Last updated: 2023-09-21Bibliographically approved
Wang, S. & Sinha, R. (2021). Life Cycle Assessment of Different Prefabricated Rates for Building Construction. Buildings, 11(11), Article ID 552.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life Cycle Assessment of Different Prefabricated Rates for Building Construction
2021 (English)In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 552Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, Sweden has promoted prefabricated buildings supporting the increasing of prefabricated rates in buildings with precast components, in order to reduce the environmental problems caused by the construction sector. This study, focusing on the construction activities, examines how the increasing prefabricated rate could influence the environmental impacts of the construction sector. This study conducts a cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment (LCA) of a reference building with a prefabricated rate of 26% in the Stockholm Royal Seaport, and compares nine scenarios with prefabricated rates, ranging from 6% to 96%. The results indicate the water footprint decreases, but the total energy footprint and carbon footprint increase as the prefabricated rate increases. Among other impacts, terrestrial ecotoxicity shows the biggest increase with an increase of the prefabricated rate. This study reveals that material extraction is the largest influencing factor, causing a water footprint when the prefabricated rate increases. The impact changes in the energy footprint, carbon footprint, and terrestrial ecotoxicity, and are primarily determined by transport and are sensitive to transport distance and vehicle types.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2021
Keywords
life cycle assessment, cradle-to-gate LCA, prefabricated buildings, prefabricated rate, building environmental impacts
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-306439 (URN)10.3390/buildings11110552 (DOI)000725526000001 ()2-s2.0-85119920098 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20211217

Available from: 2021-12-17 Created: 2021-12-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Papageorgiou, A., Henrysson, M., Nuur, C., Sinha, R., Sundberg, C. & Vanhuyse, F. (2021). Mapping and assessing indicator-based frameworks for monitoring Circular Economy development at the city-level. Sustainable cities and society, 75, Article ID 103378.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping and assessing indicator-based frameworks for monitoring Circular Economy development at the city-level
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2021 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 75, article id 103378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The transition towards a circular economy (CE) is increasingly recognized as a promising pathway to tackle pressing sustainability challenges at the city-level. Indicator-based frameworks, that is, integrated systems of indicators, are considered as useful tools for monitoring this transition. Yet, studies that map and assess such frameworks are scanty. This article addresses this gap by assessing 15 indicator-based frameworks applicable to measure circularity at the city-level. The identified frameworks were assessed using eight criteria (transparency, stakeholder engagement, effective communication, ability to track temporal changes, applicability, alignment with CE principles, validity and relevance to sustainable development). Additionally, 12 validity requirements were defined to assess to what extent the indicators in the frameworks reflect CE aspects. The assessment reveals a wide variation regarding the extent to which the frameworks match the criteria with none of them satisfying all. In addition, in terms of validity criterion, none includes indicators that fulfill all the validity requirements. Furthermore, most frameworks consist mainly of environmental indicators and only three include indicators reflecting aspects related to the four pillars of sustainable development (environmental, social, economic and governance). Further research could develop a standardized framework for measuring circularity at the city-level and improving existing frameworks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2021
Keywords
Circular cities, Circularity, Indicators, indicators, Metrics, Monitoring and evaluation, Sustainable urban development
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-302983 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2021.103378 (DOI)000728571100006 ()2-s2.0-85116134733 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-03237
Note

QC 20211213

Available from: 2021-10-03 Created: 2021-10-03 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Thomas, J.-B., Sinha, R., Strand, Å., Söderqvist, T., Stadmark, J., Franzén, F., . . . Hasselström, L. (2021). Marine biomass for a circular blue‐green bioeconomy? A life cycle perspective on closing nitrogen and phosphorus land‐marine loops. Journal of Industrial Ecology, Article ID jiec.13177.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marine biomass for a circular blue‐green bioeconomy? A life cycle perspective on closing nitrogen and phosphorus land‐marine loops
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, article id jiec.13177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A blue-green bioeconomy revolution is underway in Europe, with particular attention being paid to the development of new or underutilized marine biomass resources. The wild harvest and mariculture of low-trophic non-fed species of marine biomass may be contributing to circular economies, the mitigation of environmental problems such as eutrophication and climate change through the uptake of nutrients and carbon, while also recovering finite phosphorus from marine coastal environments, thus contributing to food security. The present study provides a cradle-to-gate life cycle perspective on seven established or innovative/emerging marine biomass utilization cases in Sweden: mariculture of sugar kelp, blue mussels, and ascidians and the harvest of invasive Pacific oysters along the Skagerrak coast, the mariculture of blue mussels in the Baltic sea, the harvest of common reed in the Stockholm archipelago, and the harvest of beach-cast seaweed in Gotland. Results showed that the mariculture cases were found to contribute to eutrophication and climate impact mitigation (at gate). All cases were found to contribute to closing the loop on phosphorus by enabling recovery from marine or coastal environments, bridging marine–land flows, all while performing well from an environmental perspective with a relatively low cumulative energy demand and low carbon and nutrient footprints. This highlights the potential of low-trophic biomass to contribute to phosphorus security in the future, and demonstrates the value of industrial ecology tools such as LCA in support of this imminent Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development. 

Keywords
General Social Sciences, General Environmental Science
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering Environmental Management Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-303328 (URN)10.1111/jiec.13177 (DOI)000673656800001 ()2-s2.0-85110303357 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20211110

Available from: 2021-10-12 Created: 2021-10-12 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Papageorgiou, A., Sinha, R., Frostell, B. & Sundberg, C. (2019). A new physical accounting model for material flows in urban systems with application to the Stockholm Royal Seaport District. Journal of Industrial Ecology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new physical accounting model for material flows in urban systems with application to the Stockholm Royal Seaport District
2019 (English)In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sustainable urbanization requires streamlining of resource management in urban systems which in turn requires understanding of urban metabolism (UM). Even though various methods have been applied for UM analysis, to date there is no standardized method for comprehensive accounting of material flows in urban systems. Moreover, the accounting of material flows is rarely implemented with a bottom-up approach that can provide a thorough analysis of UM. This article presents the Urban Accounting Model (UAM) which aims to allow comprehensive accounting of urban material flows based on a bottom-up approach. The model comprises two interlinked sub-models. The first was developed by integrating a new physical input output table (PIOT) framework for urban systems into a three-dimensional structure. The second comprises a set of physical accounts for systematic accounting of material flows of each economic sector in the system in order to support the compilation of the PIOTs. The functions of the UAM were explored through its application to two urban neighborhoods in the Stockholm Royal Seaport district. The application highlighted that the UAM can describe the physical interactions between the urban system and the environment or other socioeconomic systems, and capture the intersectoral flows within the system. Moreover, its accounts provide information that allow an in-depth analysis of the metabolism of specific sectors. Overall, the UAM can function as a useful tool for UM analysis as it systematizes data collection and at the same time depicts the physical reality of the urban system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019
Keywords
bottom-up, industrial ecology, material flow analysis, physical input output table, Stockholm Royal Seaport, urban metabolism, Economics, Bottom up, Stockholm, Urban metabolisms, Industry
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-268459 (URN)10.1111/jiec.12963 (DOI)000498405900001 ()2-s2.0-85075785194 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20200409

Available from: 2020-04-09 Created: 2020-04-09 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2459-0311

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