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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Sophonrat, N., Sandström, L., Svanberg, R., Han, T., Dvinskikh, S., Lousada, C. M. & Yang, W. (2019). Ex Situ Catalytic Pyrolysis of a Mixture of Polyvinyl Chloride and Cellulose Using Calcium Oxide for HCl Adsorption and Catalytic Reforming of the Pyrolysis Products. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 58(31), 13960-13970
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ex Situ Catalytic Pyrolysis of a Mixture of Polyvinyl Chloride and Cellulose Using Calcium Oxide for HCl Adsorption and Catalytic Reforming of the Pyrolysis Products
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2019 (English)In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 58, no 31, p. 13960-13970Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the context of chemical recycling of mixed plastics and paper, multitemperature step pyrolysis has shown good potential for the separation of oxygenated products from hydrocarbons. Here, we report results of an investigation of the first pyrolysis step at low temperature, which involves the dehydrochlorination of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and the pyrolysis of cellulose, the main component of paper. Calcium oxide (CaO), selected for its chloride adsorption ability and its catalytic activity on biooil deoxygenation, was used for upgrading the downstream products from the pyrolysis. Additionally, we studied the performance of CaO for the simultaneous adsorption of HCl and for reforming cellulose pyrolysates in the temperature range of 300-600 degrees C with feedstock to CaO ratios of 1:0.2, 1:0.4, and 1:1. It was found that the suitable catalytic temperature for HCl and acetic acid adsorption is lower than 400 degrees C. This is due to the desorption of HCl from CaCl2 and Ca(OH)Cl in the presence of water and CO2 at 400 degrees C and higher. A larger amount of CaO resulted in a more efficient reduction of acids and the organic liquids were found to have lower amounts of oxygen. A comparison between the cases of neat and mixed feedstock showed that pyrolysis of mixed feedstock produced more water, H-2, CO, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) when compared to the case of neat materials over CaO.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
National Category
Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257448 (URN)10.1021/acs.iecr.9b02299 (DOI)000480496100016 ()2-s2.0-85071301059 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190830

Available from: 2019-08-30 Created: 2019-08-30 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ghadami Yazdi, M., Lousada, C. M., Evertsson, J., Rullik, L., Soldemo, M., Bertram, F., . . . Göthelid, M. (2019). Structure dependent effect of silicon on the oxidation of Al(111) and Al(100). Surface Science, 684, 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structure dependent effect of silicon on the oxidation of Al(111) and Al(100)
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2019 (English)In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 684, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effect of sub-monolayer silicon on the oxidation of Al(111) and Al(100) surfaces was investigated using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On both surfaces the adatom site is preferred over substituting Si into the Al-lattice; on Al(100) the four fold hollow site is vastly favored whereas on Al(111) bridge and hollow sites are almost equal in energy. Upon O 2 exposure, Si is not oxidized but buried at the metal/oxide interface under the growing aluminum oxide. On Al(111), Si has a catalytic effect on both the initial oxidation by aiding in creating a higher local oxygen coverage in the early stages of oxidation and, in particular, at higher oxide coverages by facilitating lifting Al from the metal into the oxide. The final oxide, as measured from the Al2p intensity, is 25–30% thicker with Si than without. This observation is valid for both 0.1 monolayer (ML) and 0.3 ML Si coverage. On Al(100), on the other hand, at 0.16 ML Si coverage, the initial oxidation is faster than for the bare surface due to Si island edges being active in the oxide growth. At 0.5 ML Si coverage the oxidation is slower, as the islands coalesce and he amount of edges reduces. Upon oxide formation the effect of Si vanishes as it is overgrown by Al 2 O 3 , and the oxide thickness is only 6% higher than on bare Al(100), for both Si coverages studied. Our findings indicate that, in addition to a vanishing oxygen adsorption energy and Mott potential, a detailed picture of atom exchange and transport at the metal/oxide interface has to be taken into account to explain the limiting oxide thickness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Aluminum, Density functional theory, Oxidation, Silicon, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246413 (URN)10.1016/j.susc.2019.02.005 (DOI)000470192900001 ()2-s2.0-85061563000 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190402

Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Lousada, C. M., Johansson, A. J. & Korzhavyi, P. . (2018). Adsorption of Hydrogen Sulfide, Hydrosulfide and Sulfide at Cu(110) - Polarizability and Cooperativity Effects. First Stages of Formation of a Sulfide Layer. ChemPhysChem, 19(17), 2159-2168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adsorption of Hydrogen Sulfide, Hydrosulfide and Sulfide at Cu(110) - Polarizability and Cooperativity Effects. First Stages of Formation of a Sulfide Layer
2018 (English)In: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 19, no 17, p. 2159-2168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the surface site preference for single adsorbates, the interactions between adsorbates, how these interactions affect surface site specificity in adsorption and perturb the electronic states of surfaces is important for rationalizing the structure of interfaces and the growth of surface products. Herein, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigated the adsorption of H2S, HS and, S onto Cu(110). The surface site specificity observed for single adsorbates can be largely affected by the presence of other adsorbates, especially S that can affect the adsorption of other species even at distances of 13 Å. The large supercell employed with a surface periodicity of (6×6) allowed us to safely use the Helmholtz method for the determination of the dipole of the surface-adsorbate complex at low adsorbate coverages. We found that the surface perturbation induced by S can be explained by the charge transfer model, H2S leads to a perturbation of the surface that arises mostly from Pauli exclusion effects, whereas HS shows a mix of charge transfer and Pauli exclusion effects. These effects have a large contribution to the long range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions observed. Further support for the long range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions are the values of the adsorption energies of adsorbate pairs that are larger than the sum of the adsorption energies of the single adsorbates that constitute the pair. This happens even for large distances and thus goes beyond the H-bond contribution for the H-bond capable adsorbate pairs. Exploiting this knowledge we investigated two models for describing the first stages of growth of a layer of S-atoms at the surface: the formation of islands versus the formation of more homogeneous surface distributions of S-atoms. We found that for coverages lower than 0.5 ML the S-atoms prefer to cluster as islands that evolve to stripes along the [1 (Formula presented.) 0] direction with increasing coverage. At 0.5 ML a homogeneous distribution of S-atoms becomes more stable than the formation of stripes. For the coverage equivalent to 1 ML, the formation of two half-monolayers of S-atoms that disrupt the Cu−Cu bonds between the first and second layer is more favorable than the formation of 1 ML homogeneous coverage of S-atoms. Here the S−Cu bond distances and geometries are reminiscent of pyrite, covellite, and to some extent chalcocite. The small energy difference of ≈0.1 eV that exists between this structure and the formation of 1 ML suggests that in a real system at finite temperature both structures may coexist leading to a structure with even lower symmetry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2018
Keywords
adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, copper sulfide growth, hydrogen sulfide, polarizability, sulfur adsorption
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236702 (URN)10.1002/cphc.201800246 (DOI)000443680500008 ()2-s2.0-85052734894 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB
Note

Export Date: 22 October 2018; Article; CODEN: CPCHF; Correspondence Address: Lousada, C.M.; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology SE-Sweden; email: cmlp@kth.se; Funding details: SKB, Svensk Kärnbränslehantering; Funding details: KTH, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan; Funding text: Financial support from the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is gratefully acknowledged. The computations were performed on resources provided by the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC): at the Center for High Performance Computing at the KTH – Royal Institute of Technology (PDC). QC 20181112

Available from: 2018-11-12 Created: 2018-11-12 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Xia, S., Lousada, C. M., Mao, H., Maier, A. C., Korzhavyi, P. ., Sandström, R., . . . Zhang, Y. (2018). Erratum: Nonlinear oxidation behavior in pure Ni and Ni-containing entropic alloys (Front. Mater., (2018) 5, 53, 10.3389/fmats.2018.00053). Frontiers in Materials, 5, Article ID 73.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Erratum: Nonlinear oxidation behavior in pure Ni and Ni-containing entropic alloys (Front. Mater., (2018) 5, 53, 10.3389/fmats.2018.00053)
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Materials, ISSN 2296-8016, Vol. 5, article id 73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the original article, there was an error. An explanation should be inserted at the beginning of the section Thermodynamic Calculations, Paragraph 1, line 1: In this as well as the following paragraphs the authors refer to phases such as halite, spinel, corundum etc. It thereby solely referred to the structure type and not the respective mineral. In the original article, there was an error. The word "sfinancial" should be corrected to "financial" in the Acknowledgements section, Paragraph 1: The Carl Tryggers Stiftelse för Vetenskaplig Forskning is gratefully acknowledged for financial support. The authors apologize for these errors and state that they do not change the scientific conclusions of the article in any way. The original article has been updated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
National Category
Theoretical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252249 (URN)10.1177/0956797615602271 (DOI)2-s2.0-85062450216 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC20190612

Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Korzhavyi, P. ., Li, Y., Soroka, I. L. & Lousada, C. M. (2018). Exploring configurational degrees of freedom in disordered solids. In: International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering 2018 (ICCMSE 2018): . Paper presented at International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering 2018, ICCMSE 2018, The Met Hotel, Thessaloniki, Greece, 14 March 2018 through 18 March 2018. American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2040, Article ID 020003.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring configurational degrees of freedom in disordered solids
2018 (English)In: International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering 2018 (ICCMSE 2018), American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2018, Vol. 2040, article id 020003Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent computational modeling studies of configurational degrees of freedom in oxide-hydroxides of aluminum and copper are reviewed. Density functional theory calculations are employed to investigate the effect of hydrogen on the structural stability of gamma-alumina and to explore the configurational space of cuprous hydroxide CuOH. Free energy modeling, taking into account configurational and vibrational degrees of freedom, shows that the studied hydrogenated oxides of aluminum and copper are metastable compounds, whereas the respective oxides are thermodynamically stable phases. Selected structural and optical properties of the studied compounds, evaluated using a hybrid functional approach, are reported and compared with available experimental data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2018
Series
AIP Conference Proceedings, ISSN 0094-243X ; 2040
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-241387 (URN)10.1063/1.5079045 (DOI)000467966400002 ()2-s2.0-85058654905 (Scopus ID)9780735417663 (ISBN)
Conference
International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering 2018, ICCMSE 2018, The Met Hotel, Thessaloniki, Greece, 14 March 2018 through 18 March 2018
Funder
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKBSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research
Note

QC 20190121

Available from: 2019-01-21 Created: 2019-01-21 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
Lousada, C. M. & Korzhavyi, P. . (2018). First stages of oxide growth on Al(1 1 0) and core-level shifts from density functional theory calculations. Applied Surface Science, 441, 174-186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First stages of oxide growth on Al(1 1 0) and core-level shifts from density functional theory calculations
2018 (English)In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 441, p. 174-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The formation of islands of O-atoms is the dominant mode of growth of the oxide in the first stages of oxidation of Al(1 1 1). It is however unknown if a similar mechanism exists for other low index surfaces of Al. We performed a density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular dynamics investigation of the first stages of the oxidation of Al(1 1 0) using two distinct models: a homogeneous surface disposition of O-atoms; and a model where the O-atoms are close-spaced forming clusters or islands. We investigated the surface reactions with oxygen up to a coverage of 2 ML and found that for both models the adsorption energy per dissociating O2(g) becomes more negative with increasing coverage. Our results show that for coverages up to 1.25 ML the oxide forms clusters or islands while for coverages higher than 1.5 ML the oxide covers the surface homogeneously. This is because the O-atoms bind preferably to neighboring sites even at the minimum coverage. With increasing coverage, the clusters of O start to form stripes along the [1 1¯ 0] direction. The work function (ϕ) of the surface decreases when going from bare Al(1 1 0) to up to 1 ML coverage of O-atoms, but for coverages of 1.25 ML and higher, ϕ increases. The Al 2p surface core level shifts (SCLS) shift towards higher binding energies with increasing surface coverage of O-atoms and start to approach the values of Al 2p in Al2O3 already at a coverage of 2ML. A relation between the SCLS and the coordination number of Al to O-atoms was made. The Al 2p SCLS increases with increasing coordination to O-atoms, for single, twofold and three-fourfold coordinated cations. For the O-atoms that terminate the surface at the short-bridge sites, the SCLS of O 1s, is largely affected by the proximity to other O-atoms. These results demonstrate that the cooperative effects between surface bound O-atoms have important roles in the mechanism of growth of the oxide at Al(1 1 0), and similarly to what happens for Al(1 1 1), the initial oxidation of Al(1 1 0) proceeds via the formation of islands of O-atoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Al(1 1 0), Aluminum, DFT, Oxidation, Oxygen adsorption, Oxygen islands
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-227568 (URN)10.1016/j.apsusc.2018.01.246 (DOI)000427816400021 ()2-s2.0-85041747539 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RMA11-0090
Note

QC 20180517

Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Lousada, C. M., Sophonrat, N. & Weihong, Y. (2018). Mechanisms of Formation of H, HO, and Water and of Water Desorption in the Early Stages of Cellulose Pyrolysis. The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 122(23), 12168-12176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanisms of Formation of H, HO, and Water and of Water Desorption in the Early Stages of Cellulose Pyrolysis
2018 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 23, p. 12168-12176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we report the results from a combined first-principles and experimental investigation of the initial stages of decomposition of cellulose during heating in pyrolysis. Density functional theory calculations with periodic boundary conditions were performed to investigate the formation of H and HO radicals and of the molecular products H2O, H-2, and H2O2 originating from their recombination. The stabilization that alcohol groups impart to adjacent C-radicals and the allylic recombination of unpaired electrons of neighboring C-radicals play decisive roles in the decomposition mechanism. This makes the simultaneous formation of H-center dot from C2 and HO center dot from C3 the most favorable process. The recombination of these radicals to form water leads to an additional stabilization of the reaction. The computed temperature-dependent reactions Gibbs' free energies reveal that desorption of H2O from intact cellulose occurs at T = 147 degrees C and that gas-phase water forms spontaneously from the decomposition of cellulose at T = 282 degrees C. These results are in excellent agreement with our experimental study of the pyrolysis done with pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at different temperatures. The experiments show that upon heating, a small amount of water is released from cellulose at 210 degrees C, and a considerably larger amount starts to be released at 280 degrees C.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2018
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231703 (URN)10.1021/acs.jpcc.8b02173 (DOI)000435611900005 ()2-s2.0-85047430208 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180822

Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-08-22 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
Xia, S., Lousada, C. M., Mao, H., Maier, A. C., Korzhavyi, P. ., Sandström, R., . . . Zhang, Y. (2018). Nonlinear oxidation behavior in pure Ni and Ni-containing entropic alloys. Frontiers in Materials, 5, Article ID 53.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nonlinear oxidation behavior in pure Ni and Ni-containing entropic alloys
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Materials, ISSN 2296-8016, Vol. 5, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We performed a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the oxidation behavior of pure Ni and of the following multi-component Ni-containing alloys with nearly equiatomic compositions: FeNi, CoFeNi, CoCrFeNi, and CoCrFeMnNi. The materials were exposed to air at ambient pressure and at a temperature of 800°C for 150 min, their weight-gain due to oxidation was continuously monitored and the products of oxidation were subsequently characterized by XRD. The most common oxides formed have spinel or halite structure and the materials resistance to oxidation increases as: FeNi < CoFeNi < Ni < CoCrFeMnNi < CoCrFeNi. We found further that the oxidation-resistance of the materials does not correlate linearly with the number of elements present, instead the type of elements impacts significantly the materials susceptibility to oxidative damage. Cr is the element that imparted higher resistance to oxidation while Mn and Fe worsened the materials performance. In order to better understand the mechanisms of oxidation we employed thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and predicted the phase stability of oxides of the elements that are present in the materials, in different ranges of temperature, composition and oxygen activity. Additionally, we determined the phase compositions for the thermodynamically stable oxides at 800°C. The results from the thermodynamic modeling are in good agreement with the experimental finds. The alloys with low resistance to oxidation such as CoFeNi and FeNi, form the Fe 3 O 4 spinel phase which tends to dominate the phase diagram for these materials. The presence of Cr increases the resistance to atomic rearrangement due to slow diffusion in the complex structure of Cr containing spinel phases. This causes the extremely high resistance to oxidation of the CoCrFeNi alloy. The presence of Mn in CoCrFeNi stabilizes the Mn 3 O 4 spinel, which reduces the oxidation-resistance of the alloys due to the high mobility of Mn.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
High-entropy alloys, Nonlinear behavior, Oxidation, Single-phase multicomponent alloys, Thermodynamic calculations
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-247186 (URN)10.3389/fmats.2018.00053 (DOI)000443961600001 ()2-s2.0-85062451872 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190506

Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-05-06Bibliographically approved
Xia, S., Lousada, C. M., Mao, H., Maier, A. C., Korzhavyi, P. ., Sandström, R., . . . Zhang, Y. (2018). Nonlinear Oxidation Behavior in Pure Ni and Ni-Containing Entropic Alloys (vol 5, 53, 2018). FRONTIERS IN MATERIALS, 5, Article ID 73.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nonlinear Oxidation Behavior in Pure Ni and Ni-Containing Entropic Alloys (vol 5, 53, 2018)
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2018 (English)In: FRONTIERS IN MATERIALS, ISSN 2296-8016, Vol. 5, article id 73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2018
Keywords
single-phase multicomponent alloys, oxidation, thermodynamic calculations, high-entropy alloys, nonlinear behavior
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239990 (URN)10.3389/fmats.2018.00073 (DOI)000451624300001 ()
Note

QC 20181211

Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Lousada, C. M. & Korzhavyi, P. . (2018). The first stages of oxide growth at the low index Al surfaces (100), (110), (111): clusters and stripes vs. homogeneous growth. Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, 20(46), 29549-29557
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The first stages of oxide growth at the low index Al surfaces (100), (110), (111): clusters and stripes vs. homogeneous growth
2018 (English)In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 20, no 46, p. 29549-29557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We performed a density functional theory (DFT) investigation of the mechanisms of oxide growth at Al(100), Al(110) and Al(111) up to 1 monolayer (ML) coverage of O-atoms with 0.125 ML increments. We found that the surface binding site preferences of O-atoms are largely affected by the presence of neighboring O-atoms. Based on this we constructed two oxide growth models: the formation of clusters that evolve to stripes with increasing coverage and the formation of a more homogeneous distribution of O-atoms. While the former model is characterized by a lower symmetry of distribution of O-atoms at the surfaces, the latter corresponds to higher symmetries. We found that the prevalence of each oxide growth mode depends on the coverage of O-atoms and that this dependency is different for each surface. For Al(100) and Al(110), up to coverages of 1 ML the oxide grows preferably via the formation of clusters that evolve to stripes with increasing coverage, while for Al(111) the stripes and clusters are the preferred growth mode for coverages up to 0.375 ML, beyond which the homogeneous growth mode is energetically favored. The calculated Al-O pair distribution functions show that the formation of clusters and stripes leads to shorter Al-O bond lengths when compared to the homogeneous growth. The oxides formed at Al(100) and Al(110) have Al-O bond lengths and geometries typical of the shorter bonds of -alumina while at Al(111) the bond lengths are typical of -alumina and -alumina. These results suggest that for low coverages, the oxides formed at Al(100) and Al(110) are resemblant of defective -alumina while the oxide formed at Al(111) is similar to less disordered -alumina and -alumina. For Al(111), the small energy difference between the growth of clusters and stripes and homogeneous growth does not exclude the coexistence of both growth modes; this could lead to the formation of a defective or amorphous oxide.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY, 2018
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240998 (URN)10.1039/c8cp04519d (DOI)000453935400054 ()30457618 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057236874 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190109

Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0086-5536

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