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Lucero, A., Desjardins, A., Neustaedter, C., Höök, K., Hassenzahl, M. & Cecchinato, M. E. (2019). A sample of one: First-person research methods in HCI. In: DIS 2019 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2019 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference: . Paper presented at 2019 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2019; San Diego; United States; 23 June 2019 through 28 June 2019 (pp. 385-388). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A sample of one: First-person research methods in HCI
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2019 (English)In: DIS 2019 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2019 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 385-388Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

First-person research (i.e., research that involves data collection and experiences from the researcher themselves) continues to become a viable addition and, possibly even, alternative to more traditional HCI methods. While we have seen the benefits of using methods such as autoethnography, autobiographical design, and autoethnographical research through design, we also see the need to further explore, define, and investigate the practices, techniques, tactics, and implications of first-person research in HCI. To address this, this one-day workshop aims to bring together a community of researchers, designers, and practitioners who are interested in exploring and reimagining research in HCI and interaction design, with an emphasis on first-person methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019
Keywords
Autobiographical design, Autoethnography, Design research, First-person research, Research through design
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-262621 (URN)10.1145/3301019.3319996 (DOI)2-s2.0-85069479630 (Scopus ID)9781450362702 (ISBN)
Conference
2019 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2019; San Diego; United States; 23 June 2019 through 28 June 2019
Note

QC 20191030

Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Sanches, P., Höök, K., Sas, C. & Stahl, A. (2019). Ambiguity as a resource to inform proto-practices: The case of skin conductance. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 26(4), Article ID 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambiguity as a resource to inform proto-practices: The case of skin conductance
2019 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 26, no 4, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Skin conductance is an interesting measure of arousal level, largely unfamiliar to most end-users. We designed a mobile application mirroring end-users’ skin conductance in evocative visualizations, purposefully made ambiguous to invite rich interpretations. Twenty-three participants used the system for a month. Through the lens of a practice-based analysis of weekly interviews and the logged data, several quite different—sometimes even mutually exclusive—interpretations or proto-practices arose: as stress management; sports performance; emotion tracking; general life logging; personality representation; or behavior change practices. This suggests the value of a purposefully open initial design to allow for the emergence of broader proto-practices to be followed by a second step of tailored design for each identified goal to facilitate the transition from proto-practice to practice. We contribute to the HCI discourse on ambiguity in design, arguing for balancing openness and ambiguity with scaffolding to better support the emergence of practices around biodata.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257745 (URN)10.1145/3318143 (DOI)000496740900002 ()2-s2.0-85069516500 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190905

QC 20191016

Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, S., Unander-Scharin, Å., Trichon, V., Unander-Scharin, C., Kjellström, H. & Höök, K. (2019). Dancing with Drones: Crafting Novel Artistic Expressions through Intercorporeality. In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at ACM SIGCHI (pp. 617:1-617:12). New York, NY USA
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dancing with Drones: Crafting Novel Artistic Expressions through Intercorporeality
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY USA, 2019, p. 617:1-617:12Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY USA: , 2019
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257746 (URN)10.1145/3290605.3300847 (DOI)000474467907074 ()2-s2.0-85067597620 (Scopus ID)
Conference
ACM SIGCHI
Projects
KAW 2015.0080, Engineering theInterconnected Society: Information, Control, Interaction
Note

QC 20190916

Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Balaam, M., Comber, R., Clarke, R. E., Windlin, C., Ståhl, A., Höök, K. & Fitzpatrick, G. (2019). Emotion Work in Experience-Centred Design. In: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Proceedings (CHI 2019), May 4–9, 2019, Glasgow, Scotland UK: . Paper presented at CHI 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion Work in Experience-Centred Design
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2019 (English)In: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Proceedings (CHI 2019), May 4–9, 2019, Glasgow, Scotland UK, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Experience Centred Design (ECD) implores us to develop empathic relationships and understanding of participants, to actively work with our senses and emotions within the design process. However, theories of experience-centred design do little to account for emotion work undertaken by design researchers when doing this. As a consequence, how a design researcher’s emotions are experienced, navigated and used as part of an ECD process are rarely published. So, while emotion is clearly a tool that we use, we don’t share with one another how, why and when it gets used. This has a limiting effect on how we understand design processes, and opportunities for training. Here, we share some of our experiences of working with ECD. We analyse these using Hochschild’s framework of emotion work to show how and where this work occurs. We use our analysis to question current ECD practices and provoke debate.

Keywords
emotion work, experience-centred design, design research
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252787 (URN)10.1145/3290605.3300832 (DOI)000474467907059 ()2-s2.0-85067599533 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI 2019
Projects
Affective Health, Innovative Training Network under Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 722022
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RIT15- 0046Swedish Research Council, 2017-05133
Note

QC 20190624

Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
Sanches, P., Janson, A., Karpashevich, P., Nadal, C., Qu, C., Daudén Roquet, C., . . . Corina, S. (2019). HCI and Affective Health: Taking stock of a decade of studies and charting future research directions. In: : . Paper presented at In Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HCI and Affective Health: Taking stock of a decade of studies and charting future research directions
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM, 2019
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257744 (URN)10.1145/3290605.3300475 (DOI)000474467903016 ()2-s2.0-85067625758 (Scopus ID)
Conference
In Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Projects
AffecTech
Note

QC 20190904

Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Cockton, G., Höök, K., Kaye, J., Waern, A., Wynn, E. & Williamson, J. (2019). Moving Towards a Journal-centric Publication Model for CHI: Possible Paths, Opportunities and Risks. In: CHI EA '19 EXTENDED ABSTRACTS: EXTENDED ABSTRACTS OF THE 2019 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS. Paper presented at 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2019; Glasgow; United Kingdom; 4 May 2019 through 9 May 2019. ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moving Towards a Journal-centric Publication Model for CHI: Possible Paths, Opportunities and Risks
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2019 (English)In: CHI EA '19 EXTENDED ABSTRACTS: EXTENDED ABSTRACTS OF THE 2019 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As a scholarly field, the ACM SIGCHI community maintains a strong focus on conferences as its main outlet for scholarly publication. Historically, this originates in how the field of computer science adopted a conference-centric publication model as well as in the organizational focus of ACM. Lately, this model has become increasingly challenged for a number of reasons, and multiple alternatives are emerging within the SIGCHI community as well as in adjacent communities. Through revisiting examples from other conferences and neighboring communities, this panel explores alternative publication paths and their opportunities and risks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY, 2019
Keywords
ACM proceedings, conference, journal, hybrid publication model
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260227 (URN)10.1145/3290607.3311743 (DOI)000482042103005 ()2-s2.0-85067306063 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2019; Glasgow; United Kingdom; 4 May 2019 through 9 May 2019
Note

QC 20190929

Available from: 2019-09-29 Created: 2019-09-29 Last updated: 2019-09-29Bibliographically approved
Windlin, C., Ståhl, A., Sanches, P., Tsaknaki, V., Karpashevich, P., Balaam, M. & Höök, K. (2019). Soma Bits - Mediating Technology to Orchestrate Bodily Experiences. In: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference19–22/03/2019: . Paper presented at RTD 2019 - Research through Design Conference 2019, the Science Centre, Delft, on 19th to 22nd March 2019..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soma Bits - Mediating Technology to Orchestrate Bodily Experiences
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference19–22/03/2019, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Soma Bits are a prototyping toolkit that facilitates Soma Design. Acting as an accessible ‘sociodigital material’ Soma Bits allow designers to pair digital technologies, with their whole body and senses, as part of an iterative soma design process.The Soma Bits addresses the difficulty we experienced in past Soma Design processes — that articulating ofsensations we want to evoke to others, and thenmaintaining these experiences in memory throughout a design process. Thus, the Soma Bits enable designers to know and experience what a designmight ‘feel like’ and to share that with others.

The Soma Bits relate to three experiential qualities:‘feeling connected’, ‘feeling embraced’, and ‘being in correspondence’ with the interactive materials. The Soma Bits have a form factor and materiality thatallow actuators (heat, vibration, and shape-changing) to be placed on and around the body; they are easily configurable to enable quick and controllable creations of soma experiences which can be both part of a first-person approach as well as shared withothers. The Soma Bits are a living, growing library ofshapes and actuators. We use them in our own designpractices, as well as when engaging others in soma design processes.

Keywords
Somaesthetic Interaction Design, Design Process
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253818 (URN)10.6084/m9.figshare.7855799.v2 (DOI)
Conference
RTD 2019 - Research through Design Conference 2019, the Science Centre, Delft, on 19th to 22nd March 2019.
Projects
Affective Health, Innova- tive Training Network funded by the H2020 People Programme under Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 722022
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RIT15-0046
Note

QC 20190619

Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Mueller, F. "., Andres, J., Marshall, J., Svanæs, D., schraefel, m. c., Gerling, K., . . . Sas, C. (2018). Body-centric Computing: Results from a Weeklong Dagstuhl Seminar in a German Castle. interactions, 25(4), 34-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body-centric Computing: Results from a Weeklong Dagstuhl Seminar in a German Castle
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2018 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM, 2018
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240605 (URN)10.1145/3215854 (DOI)
Note

QC 20181220

Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Fitzpatrick, G., Friedman, B., Höök, K., Olson, J. S. & Russell, D. M. (2018). Daring to change: Creating a slower more sustainable academic life. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2018, Montreal, Canada, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID panel06.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daring to change: Creating a slower more sustainable academic life
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2018 (English)In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id panel06Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Numerous reports and studies point to increasing performance criteria and workplace stress for academics/researchers. Together with the audience, this panel will explore how we experience this in the HCI community, focussing particularly on what we can do to change this for a slower more sustainable academic culture. The future of good quality HCI research is dependent on happy healthy researchers and reasonable realistic academic processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Academic burnout, Culture change, Performance accountability, Work life balance
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-234124 (URN)10.1145/3170427.3186322 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052022835 (Scopus ID)9781450356206 (ISBN)9781450356213 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2018, Montreal, Canada, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018
Note

QC 20180903

Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Fernaeus, Y., Höök, K. & Ståhl, A. (2018). Designing for Joyful Movement. In: Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk (Ed.), Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment (pp. 193-207). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Joyful Movement
2018 (English)In: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk, Springer , 2018, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Interaction design research has broadened its focus from settings in which people would sit more or less still in front of static computers doing their work tasks, to instead thriving off new interactive materials, mobile use, and ubiquitously available data of all sorts, creating interactions everywhere. These changes have put into question such as play versus learning, work versus leisure, or casual versus serious technology use. As both hardware and software have become mobile—both literally and in terms of transgressing cultural categories—the different social spheres and the rules that they are associated with are changing

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257754 (URN)978-3-319-68213-6 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20190903

Part of the Human–Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0002-4825

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