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Gavkalova, N., Gładysz, B., Quadrini, W., Sassanelli, C., Asplund, F., Ramli, M. R., . . . Terzi, S. (2023). Digital Innovation Hubs and portfolio of their services across European economies. Oeconomia Copernicana, 15(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital Innovation Hubs and portfolio of their services across European economies
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2023 (English)In: Oeconomia Copernicana, ISSN 2083-1277, E-ISSN 2353-1827, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research background: Digital ecosystems in Europe are heterogenous organizations involving different economies, industries, and contexts. Among them, Digital Innovation Hubs (DIHs) are considered a policy-driven organization fostered by the European Commission to push companies’ digital transition through a wide portfolio of supporting services.

Purpose of the article: There are DIHs existing in all European economies, but literature needs more precise indications about their status and nature. The purpose is to study a distribution of DIHs and differences in portfolios of DIHs’ services across European economies. Therefore, the paper wants to deliver more precise data on effects on national and European policies. This is required to define their final role and scope in the complex dynamics of the digital transition, depending on regional context and heterogeneity of industries.

Methods: Data on 38 economies was collected from the S3 platform (on both existing and in preparation DIHs) and further verified by native speaking researchers using manual web scrapping of websites of DIHs identified from S3. To find potential similarities of digital ecosystems in different economies as emanated by the existence of DIHs, clusterization (Ward’s method and Euclidean distances) was applied according to the services offered. Economies were clustered according to the number of DIHs and the spread of DIHs intensity in different cities. The results were further analyzed according to the scope of the provided services.

Findings & value added: The applied clustering classified European economies in four different sets, according to the types of services offered by the DIHs. These sets are expression of the different digitalization statuses and strategies of the selected economies and, as such, the services a company can benefit from in a specific economy. Potential development-related reasons behind the data-driven clustering are then conjectured and reported, to guide companies and policy makers in their digitalization strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Instytut Badan Gospodarczych / Institute of Economic Research, 2023
Keywords
Digital Innovation Hubs, clustering, innovation ecosystem, digital transition, Industry 4.0, digitalization
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Industrial Engineering and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-343564 (URN)10.24136/oc.2757 (DOI)001198847600006 ()2-s2.0-85192445352 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240513

Available from: 2024-02-20 Created: 2024-02-20 Last updated: 2024-05-16Bibliographically approved
Abu Sa'a, E. & Asplund, F. (2023). Enabling knowledge sharing in university-cross-industry competence centres. In: Proceedings of European Academy of Management (EURAM) 2023: Transforming Business for Good. Paper presented at European Academy of Management (EURAM), 14-16 June, Dublin, Irelind, 2023. Dublin, Ireland
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling knowledge sharing in university-cross-industry competence centres
2023 (English)In: Proceedings of European Academy of Management (EURAM) 2023: Transforming Business for Good, Dublin, Ireland, 2023Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

University competence centres (UCCs) are created to enhance university-industry collaboration and knowledge sharing among collaborating partners. This study investigates the organisation of knowledge sharing among firms in UCCs through a qualitative case study of UCCs with or without a focus on research in their activities. Data collection was done through interviews and observations over a period of 24 months. While the findings indicate that both types of UCCs are non-neutral, they also reveal several different characteristics that appear primarily based on a strong tie either to the first (education) or the second (research) mission of academia. Although both types of UCCs act to build a common meaning among participating organisations, the focus on the first or the second mission leads to this meaning is primarily being constructed in the firm-to-firm or university-to-firm interfaces, respectively. Whereas cross-industry knowledge sharing is emphasised by both types of centres, it is thus more strongly emphasised by UCCs without a focus on research as it helps to avoid harmful effects of knowledge spillovers. The focus on the first mission also appears able to sustain the organisation of knowledge ecosystems created by UCCs without a focus on research in a prefigurative form, which is otherwise typically transient. Furthermore, the challenges to sustainability are different, with centres focused on research being pre-occupied with funding issues, while centres not focused on research leveraging on others means to maintain the interest of industry. The findings contribute to innovation management research and practice by refining current understanding of processes and practices of university-industry collaboration, and how they contribute to facilitate (cross-industry) collaboration and knowledge transfer. Given that university-industry collaboration is often promoted in national innovation policies to create value for society as whole, our findings contribute towards enabling organisations, managers as well as governments to take more informed actions when engaging in such collaborations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dublin, Ireland: , 2023
Keywords
University-industry collaboration, cross-industry innovation, knowledge sharing, university competence centres, innovation intermediaries, academic logic
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Industrial Engineering and Management; Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-332998 (URN)
Conference
European Academy of Management (EURAM), 14-16 June, Dublin, Irelind, 2023
Note

QC 20230726

Available from: 2023-07-25 Created: 2023-07-25 Last updated: 2023-07-26Bibliographically approved
Asplund, F. & Ulfvengren, P. (2022). Engineer-Centred Design Factors and Methodological Approach for Maritime Autonomy Emergency Response Systems. Safety, 8(3), 54-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engineer-Centred Design Factors and Methodological Approach for Maritime Autonomy Emergency Response Systems
2022 (English)In: Safety, E-ISSN 2313-576X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 54-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Commercial deployment of maritime autonomous surface ships (MASSs) is close to becoming a reality. Although MASSs are fully autonomous, the industry will still allow remote operations centre (ROC) operators to intervene if a MASS is facing an emergency the MASS cannot handle by itself. A human-centred design for the associated emergency response systems will require attention to the ROC operator workplace, but also, arguably, to the behaviour-shaping constraints on the engineers building these systems. There is thus a need for an engineer-centred design of engineering organisations, influenced by the current discourse on human factors. To contribute to the discourse, think-aloud protocol interviewing was conducted with well-informed maritime operators to elicit fundamental demands on cognition and collaboration by maritime autonomy emergency response systems. Based on the results, inferences were made regarding both design factors and methodological choices for future, early phase engineering of emergency response systems. Firstly, engineering firms have to improve their informal gathering and sharing of information through gatekeepers and/or organisational liaisons. To avoid a too cautious approach to accountability, this will have to include a closer integration of development and operations. Secondly, associated studies taking the typical approach of exposing relevant operators to new design concepts in scripted scenarios should include significant flexibility and less focus on realism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI, 2022
Keywords
maritime autonomy; emergency response; maritime autonomous surface ship (MASS); remote operations centre (ROC); safety; cognitive systems engineering; human-centred design; engineer-centred design
National Category
Vehicle Engineering Embedded Systems Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Vehicle and Maritime Engineering; Machine Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-315978 (URN)10.3390/safety8030054 (DOI)000859605700001 ()2-s2.0-85138685391 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Boundaries of Autonomy
Note

QC 20221103

Available from: 2022-08-03 Created: 2022-08-03 Last updated: 2023-02-01Bibliographically approved
Parseh, M., Nybacka, M. & Asplund, F. (2022). Motion planning for autonomous vehicles with the inclusion of post-impact motions for minimising collision risk. Vehicle System Dynamics, 1-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motion planning for autonomous vehicles with the inclusion of post-impact motions for minimising collision risk
2022 (English)In: Vehicle System Dynamics, ISSN 0042-3114, E-ISSN 1744-5159, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The introduction of more automation into our vehicles is increasing our ability to avoid or mitigate the effects of collisions. Early systems could brake when a likely collision was detected, while more advanced systems will be able to steer to avoid or reconfigure a collision during the same circumstances. This paper addresses how the post-impact motion of an impacted vehicle could be included in the decision-making process of severity minimisation motion planning. A framework is proposed that builds on previous work by the authors, combining models from motion planning, vehicle dynamics, and accident reconstruction. This framework can be configured for different contexts by adjusting its cost function according to relevant risks. Simulations of the unified system are carried out and analysed from the perspective of vehicle model complexity and collision parameters sensitivity. Additionally, effects are highlighted concerning different modelling decisions, with respect to vehicle dynamics models and collision models, that are important to consider in further research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa UK Limited, 2022
Keywords
autonomous vehicle, collision model, collision risk, Motion planning, post-impact, vehicle dynamics
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-324952 (URN)10.1080/00423114.2022.2088396 (DOI)000815418500001 ()2-s2.0-85132837306 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230327

Available from: 2023-03-27 Created: 2023-03-27 Last updated: 2023-03-27Bibliographically approved
Asplund, F., Magnusson, M., Törngren, M., Vahlne, T. & Karlsson, M. (2022). Which skills? A critical perspective on the skills facilitating the transfer of third-cycle students to knowledge-intensive SMEs. In: Proceedings of Frontiers in Education 2022: . Paper presented at 2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2022, Uppsala, Sweden, 8-11 October 2022. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Which skills? A critical perspective on the skills facilitating the transfer of third-cycle students to knowledge-intensive SMEs
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2022 (English)In: Proceedings of Frontiers in Education 2022, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This Research Full Paper relates to public-private innovation ecosystems. This loosely knit form of cooperation allows for beneficial activities such as knowledge transfer, dissemination of novel technology, and recruitment. In these contexts students graduating from third-cycle education should be able to find opportunities for transferring to knowledge-intensive positions in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

However, a 3-year study of the reasons why firms approach public organisations within a Europe-wide, public-private innovation ecosystem suggests that students might struggle to find such opportunities. Through a questionnaire provided to all firms approaching the ecosystem we identify recruitment as one of their lowest ranked interests. By interviewing members of the public organisations found in the ecosystem we identify how cooperation is initiated and maintained, and how this influences the opportunities for students to transfer into industry. The results provide nuance to the current emphasis in skill development within third-cycle (engineering) education. It is rarely recognized that fostering technical skill and academic entrepreneurship might not be enough to allow all types and sizes of firms to receive engineering students. 

Particularly, this study identifies the academic and industrial boundary spanning roles at knowledge-intensive SMEs as important. These roles require a third-cycle education that early on hones skills that typically do not become critical until much later for students that pursue an academic path – e.g., the inter-organisational project management skills necessary to effectively seek research funding or to negotiate goal alignment between organisations. We argue that to allow third-cycle students to practice the finer points of such skills, universities need to evolve more distributed support structures for innovation that integrate in-depth engineering knowledge with innovation skills and have an increased focus on human and social capital.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022
Keywords
Engineering education, Small and medium sized enterprises (SME), Public-private innovation ecosystems, Boundary spanners, Recruitment
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-316521 (URN)10.1109/FIE56618.2022.9962435 (DOI)2-s2.0-85143797144 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2022, Uppsala, Sweden, 8-11 October 2022
Projects
Digital Innovation Hubs and Collaborative Platform for Cyber-Physical Systems
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 872698
Note

QC 20230621

Available from: 2022-08-19 Created: 2023-06-21 Last updated: 2022-08-22Bibliographically approved
Parseh, M., Asplund, F., Svensson, L., Sinz, W., Tomasch, E. & Törngren, M. (2021). A Data-Driven Method Towards Minimizing Collision Severity for Highly Automated Vehicles. IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Vehicles, 6(4), 723-735
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Data-Driven Method Towards Minimizing Collision Severity for Highly Automated Vehicles
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2021 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Vehicles, ISSN 2379-8858, E-ISSN 2379-8904, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 723-735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The deployment of autonomous vehicles on public roads calls for the development of methods that are reliably able to mitigate injury severity in case of unavoidable collisions. This study proposes a data-driven motion planning method capable of minimizing injury severity for vehicle occupants in unavoidable collisions. The method is based on establishing a metric that models the relationship between impact location and injury severity using real accident data, and subsequently including it in the cost function of a motion planning framework. The vehicle dynamics and associated constraints are considered through a precomputed trajectory library, which is generated by solving an optimal control problem. This allows for efficient computation as well as an accurate representation of the vehicle. The proposed motion planning approach is evaluated by simulation, and it is shown that the trajectory associated with the minimum cost mitigates the collision severity for occupants of passenger vehicles involved in the collision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2021
Keywords
Motion planning, collision severity, data-driven, impact location, injury severity, trajectory library, occupant safety, optimal control
National Category
Control Engineering Embedded Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-290942 (URN)10.1109/TIV.2021.3061907 (DOI)000722000500013 ()2-s2.0-85101766019 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ECSEL PRYSTINE
Note

QC 20220301

Available from: 2021-02-26 Created: 2021-02-26 Last updated: 2024-03-01Bibliographically approved
Ko, S.-T., Asplund, F. & Zeybek, B. (2021). A Scoping Review of Pressure Measurements in Prosthetic Sockets of Transfemoral Amputees during Ambulation: Key Considerations for Sensor Design. Sensors, 21(15), Article ID 5016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Scoping Review of Pressure Measurements in Prosthetic Sockets of Transfemoral Amputees during Ambulation: Key Considerations for Sensor Design
2021 (English)In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 21, no 15, article id 5016Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sensor systems to measure pressure at the stump–socket interface of transfemoral amputees are receiving increasing attention as they allow monitoring to evaluate patient comfort and socket fit. However, transfemoral amputees have many unique characteristics, and it is unclear whether existing research on sensor systems take these sufficiently into account or if it is conducted in ways likely to lead to substantial breakthroughs. This investigation addresses these concerns through a scoping review to profile research regarding sensors in transfemoral sockets with the aim of advancing and improving prosthetic socket design, comfort and fit for transfemoral amputees. Publications found from searching four scientific databases were screened, and 17 papers were found relating to the aim of this review. After quality assessment, 12 articles were finally selected for analysis. Three main contributions are provided: a de facto methodology for experimental studies on the implications of intra-socket pressure sensor use for transfemoral amputees; the suggestion that associated sensor design breakthroughs would be more likely if pressure sensors were developed in close combination with other types of sensors and in closer cooperation with those in possession of an in-depth domain knowledge in prosthetics; and that this research would be facilitated by increased interdisciplinary cooperation and open research data generation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: , 2021
Keywords
transfemoral socket; pressure sensor system; prosthetic socket comfort; gait monitoring; lower limb prosthetics
National Category
Embedded Systems
Research subject
Electrical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-298984 (URN)10.3390/s21155016 (DOI)000682228900001 ()34372253 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85110657753 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SocketSense
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 825429
Note

QC 20210810

Available from: 2021-07-24 Created: 2021-07-24 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Asplund, F. & Flening, E. (2021). Boundary spanning at work placements: Challenges to overcome, and ways to learn in preparation for early career engineering. European Journal of Engineering Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boundary spanning at work placements: Challenges to overcome, and ways to learn in preparation for early career engineering
2021 (English)In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The transition from engineering student to early career engineer is often difficult as not all skills that constitute effective engineering practice are formally taught. Work placements are suggested as a solution by providing opportunities to learn skills that academia is unable to teach. However, academic requirements for skills such as research proficiency can be overlooked in a work placement environment, since they are often seen as of little value to engineers. Nevertheless, through interviews with master’s students that have conducted their thesis projects at a firm, their experience of boundary spanning to align academic and industrial requirements has been shown to prepare them for an (early) career in engineering by providing opportunities to learn informal professional skills. As the effect is moderated by the motivation of the individual firm for offering work placements, teachers need to consider this motivation when planning and preparing a student for such a work placement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2021
Keywords
Boundary spanning; master’s education; professional engineering skills; research–teaching nexus; work placement
National Category
Embedded Systems Learning Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-291116 (URN)10.1080/03043797.2021.1889467 (DOI)000624743600001 ()2-s2.0-85119341865 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForsk, 86220
Note

QC 20210304

Available from: 2021-03-02 Created: 2021-03-02 Last updated: 2022-06-28Bibliographically approved
Parseh, M. & Asplund, F. (2021). Collision Mitigation in the Presence of Uncertainty. In: Proceedings 2021 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC 2021): . Paper presented at 2021 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, SMC 2021, Melbourne, Australia, October 17-20, 2021 (pp. 1655-1662). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collision Mitigation in the Presence of Uncertainty
2021 (English)In: Proceedings 2021 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC 2021), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2021, p. 1655-1662Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present a probabilistic collision mitigation system (CMS) that aims to decrease the severity of unavoidable collisions. CMSs have to decide when to act in order to keep enough trajectories for lowering severity available, while at the same time not increasing the collision probability. This paper operationalises the choice of when to act as a probability threshold, which is applied to all or part of the trajectories available to an automated vehicle equipped with the CMS. Through simulations the relationship between the value of the threshold, and the trade-off between being able to reduce the collision severity and not causing a collision, is investigated. We identify two types of behaviours that increase the severity of collisions: one when acting late (setting a higher threshold) reduces the number of available trajectories with lower severity, and one when acting early is susceptible to prediction errors. Regardless, by setting a lower prediction horizon the prediction accuracy increases, but also reduces the available trajectories with lower severity. We also note that the outcome of the CMS improves when the severity of a trajectory is aligned with maximum risk of collision along it, rather than the severity at the time step when it crosses the probability threshold.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2021
Keywords
Collision probability, collision severity, uncertainty, automated vehicles
National Category
Engineering and Technology Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Machine Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-311021 (URN)10.1109/SMC52423.2021.9658791 (DOI)000800532001099 ()2-s2.0-85124317657 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2021 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, SMC 2021, Melbourne, Australia, October 17-20, 2021
Note

QC 20220420

Available from: 2022-04-14 Created: 2022-04-14 Last updated: 2022-09-23Bibliographically approved
Asplund, F., Björk, J. & Magnusson, M. (2021). Knowing too much?: On bias due to domain-specific knowledge in internal crowdsourcing for explorative ideas. R&D Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowing too much?: On bias due to domain-specific knowledge in internal crowdsourcing for explorative ideas
2021 (English)In: R&D Management, ISSN 0033-6807, E-ISSN 1467-9310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Internal crowdsourcing utilizes a firm’s employees, of which many have a strong understanding of the domains in which the firm operates, for contributing with, developing and evaluating ideas. On the one hand, these employees can use their domain-specific knowledge to identify the value of what may seem a far-fetched solution to the average employee. On the other hand, previous research has shown that employees typically evaluate ideas in their domains less favorably if they do not align with ongoing exploitation activities. Hence, this study focuses on whether a higher degree of relevant domain-specific knowledge makes employees participating in internal crowdsourcing prefer exploitative solutions when evaluating ideas. An empirical study of an online platform for firm-internal innovation in a multinational engineering company showed that employees who only infrequently participated in internal crowdsourcing mostly contributed to and evaluated ideas within their own domain. Employees who frequently participated also contributed to and evaluated ideas outside their own domains. By statistically analyzing group differences during idea evaluation, we show that employees participating infrequently favor exploitable solutions, whereas employees participating frequently are more uncertain. The former difference is only seen concerning ideas that require domain-specific knowledge to understand, but the latter is observed for all types of ideas. This study makes three substantial contributions. First, employees with domain-specific knowledge, through their preference for exploitative solutions, bias the outcome of internal crowdsourcing when idea evaluation requires domain-specific knowledge. Second, this bias is aggravated by the overall higher level of uncertainty displayed by employees participating frequently in internal crowdsourcing and thereby tend to reach out to other domains. Third, in order to mitigate this, bias management can build engagement in internal crowdsourcing through idea challenges that do not require domain-specific knowledge and consider avoiding employees with a strongly associated domain knowledge for idea evaluation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
Internal crowdsouring, Internal crowds, Domain-specific knowledge
National Category
Business Administration Other Engineering and Technologies Embedded Systems Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Research subject
Industrial Engineering and Management; Electrical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-305343 (URN)10.1111/radm.12517 (DOI)000722303100001 ()2-s2.0-85120622069 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2015-01524
Note

QC 20211129

Available from: 2021-11-26 Created: 2021-11-26 Last updated: 2022-09-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5704-4504

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