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Elblaus, L. & Eckel, G. (2020). Acoustic modelling as a strategy for composing site-specific music. In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Audio Mostly. Paper presented at 15th International Audio Mostly Conference, AM 2020, 15 September 2020 through 17 September 2020 (pp. 69-76). Association for Computing Machinery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acoustic modelling as a strategy for composing site-specific music
2020 (English)In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Audio Mostly, Association for Computing Machinery , 2020, p. 69-76Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes two site-specific musical compositions, focusing on how modelling was used in their respective composition processes. Primarily, the acoustics of the sites were modelled to aid in the preparation and composition of the pieces. From this we propose the general use of modelling as a way to work with the concept of site. But the idea of formulating a model is also applicable more widely in the work described and this is discussed with the two pieces as starting points. Both pieces use acoustic room scale feedback as their only source of sound, so the impact of the room, speakers and microphones used is immense. The first piece, Rundgång, is a commission for the GRM Acousmonium. The second piece, Clockwork, is a public installation that will also be the site of a performance, combining the installation with live interventions. Clockwork will also employ modelling as a component of the piece itself, and include a remote performer and a remote audience. We suggest that there are possibilities to employ compositional strategies to embrace these kinds of hybrid presence situations by composing for many vantage points.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, 2020
Keywords
acoustics, composition, electroacoustic music, feedback, modelling, presence, room impulse response, site specificity, Clocks, Acoustic modelling, Compositional strategies, Musical composition, Site-specific, Computer music
National Category
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-291591 (URN)10.1145/3411109.3411141 (DOI)2-s2.0-85092134188 (Scopus ID)
Conference
15th International Audio Mostly Conference, AM 2020, 15 September 2020 through 17 September 2020
Note

QC 20210316

Available from: 2021-03-16 Created: 2021-03-16 Last updated: 2023-04-03Bibliographically approved
Bresin, R., Mancini, M., Elblaus, L. & Frid, E. (2020). Sonification of the self vs. sonification of the other: Differences in the sonification of performed vs. observed simple hand movements. International journal of human-computer studies, 144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sonification of the self vs. sonification of the other: Differences in the sonification of performed vs. observed simple hand movements
2020 (English)In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Existing works on interactive sonification of movements, i.e., the translation of human movement qualities from the physical to the auditory domain, usually adopt a predetermined approach: the way in which movement features modulate the characteristics of sound is fixed. In our work we want to go one step further and demonstrate that the user role can influence the tuning of the mapping between movement cues and sound parameters. Here, we aim to verify if and how the mapping changes when the user is either the performer or the observer of a series of body movements (tracing a square or an infinite shape with the hand in the air). We asked participants to tune movement sonification while they were directly performing the sonified movement vs. while watching another person performing the movement and listening to its sonification. Results show that the tuning of the sonification chosen by participants is influenced by three variables: role of the user (performer vs observer), movement quality (the amount of Smoothness and Directness in the movement), and physical parameters of the movements (velocity and acceleration). Performers focused more on the quality of their movement, while observers focused more on the sonic rendering, making it more expressive and more connected to low-level physical features.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2020
Keywords
Sonification, Mapping, Hand movement, Performance, User role
National Category
Interaction Technologies Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Media and Communication Technology Other Computer and Information Science
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-277059 (URN)10.1016/j.ijhcs.2020.102500 (DOI)000573482500002 ()2-s2.0-85086799093 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DANCE
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 645553
Note

QC 20200819

Available from: 2020-06-24 Created: 2020-06-24 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L. & Eckel, G. (2020). Utruchirp: An impulse response measurement and auralisation tool developed for artistic practice. In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: . Paper presented at 15th International Audio Mostly Conference, AM 2020, 15 September 2020 through 17 September 2020 (pp. 61-68). Association for Computing Machinery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utruchirp: An impulse response measurement and auralisation tool developed for artistic practice
2020 (English)In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2020, p. 61-68Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the utruchirp software, a tool for measuring impulse responses and modelling room acoustics in real time through auralisation based on convolution using those responses. utruchirp is the result of concerns and needs emerging from the authors' ongoing artistic practice, exploring room scale acoustic feedback as material for live performance, installations, and fixed media pieces as utrumque. The paper provides the technical and, more importantly, the artistic details of the development of utruchirp and its features, highlighting those that are the direct result of insights from artistic work: Monitoring of all stages of measuring and signal processing, auralisations of the measurements from within the measurement process, and integrated round trip delay estimation. Finally, it points out future directions and features that are to be explored next, with an invitation for collaborative efforts, aiming to bring the sensibilities of musical instruments to our measurement tools.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, 2020
Keywords
acoustics, composition, convolution, electroacoustic music, feedback, impulse response measurement, room modelling, Architectural acoustics, Impulse response, Acoustic feedback, Artistic works, Auralisation, Impulse response measurements, Measurement process, Measurement tools, Room acoustics, Round trip delay, Signal processing
National Category
Signal Processing Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Control Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-291590 (URN)10.1145/3411109.3411140 (DOI)2-s2.0-85092181963 (Scopus ID)
Conference
15th International Audio Mostly Conference, AM 2020, 15 September 2020 through 17 September 2020
Note

QC 20210324

Available from: 2021-03-24 Created: 2021-03-24 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Tsaknaki, V. & Elblaus, L. (2019). A wearable nebula material investigations of implicit interaction. In: TEI 2019 - Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction: . Paper presented at 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2019, 17 March 2019 through 20 March 2019 (pp. 625-633). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A wearable nebula material investigations of implicit interaction
2019 (English)In: TEI 2019 - Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2019, p. 625-633Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present the Nebula, a garment that translates intentional gestures and implicit interaction into sound. Nebula is a studded cloak made from a heavy fabric that envelopes the wearer with pendulous folds and has strong experiential qualities that were especially appreciated by performing artists. We describe the design process in detail, and highlight three material investigations that show material connections that were fundamental to the experience of the garment: How the draping and construction of the garment allowed for implicit interaction, how the studs were used both as a computational sensing material and a strong visual component, and how the sound design exploited tangible material qualities in the garment. We offer these three material investigations as contributions and discuss how material investigations more broadly can produce evocative connections in the materials available in design work, but also as a way to extract legible design intentions for other designers and researchers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2019
Keywords
Crafting, Implicit Interaction, Materials, Sound and Music Computing, Wearable technology, Design intention, Experiential qualities, Material quality, Sensing material, Visual components
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252214 (URN)10.1145/3294109.3295623 (DOI)000472795300079 ()2-s2.0-85063908332 (Scopus ID)9781450361965 (ISBN)
Conference
13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2019, 17 March 2019 through 20 March 2019
Note

QC 20190611

Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Frid, E., Elblaus, L. & Bresin, R. (2019). Interactive sonification of a fluid dance movement: an exploratory study. Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, 13(3), 181-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactive sonification of a fluid dance movement: an exploratory study
2019 (English)In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present three different experiments designed to explore sound properties associated with fluid movement: (1) an experiment in which participants adjusted parameters of a sonification model developed for a fluid dance movement, (2) a vocal sketching experiment in which participants sketched sounds portraying fluid versus nonfluid movements, and (3) a workshop in which participants discussed and selected fluid versus nonfluid sounds. Consistent findings from the three experiments indicated that sounds expressing fluidity generally occupy a lower register and has less high frequency content, as well as a lower bandwidth, than sounds expressing nonfluidity. The ideal sound to express fluidity is continuous, calm, slow, pitched, reminiscent of wind, water or an acoustic musical instrument. The ideal sound to express nonfluidity is harsh, non-continuous, abrupt, dissonant, conceptually associated with metal or wood, unhuman and robotic. Findings presented in this paper can be used as design guidelines for future applications in which the movement property fluidity is to be conveyed through sonification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Interactive sonification, Fluid movement, Vocal sketching, sound and music computing
National Category
Media Engineering Media and Communication Technology Human Computer Interaction Other Natural Sciences Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239168 (URN)10.1007/s12193-018-0278-y (DOI)000480549700004 ()2-s2.0-85056702595 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DANCE
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 645553
Note

QC 20190904

Available from: 2018-11-18 Created: 2018-11-18 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Frid, E., Lindetorp, H., Hansen, K. F., Elblaus, L. & Bresin, R. (2019). Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation. In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 1-12). ACM, Article ID 677.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2019, p. 1-12, article id 677Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sound Forest is a music installation consisting of a room with light-emitting interactive strings, vibrating platforms and speakers, situated at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts. In this paper we present an exploratory study focusing on evaluation of Sound Forest based on picture cards and interviews. Since Sound Forest should be accessible for everyone, regardless age or abilities, we invited children, teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities to take part in the evaluation. The main contribution of this work lies in its fndings suggesting that multisensory platforms such as Sound Forest, providing whole-body vibrations, can be used to provide visitors of diferent ages and abilities with similar associations to musical experiences. Interviews also revealed positive responses to haptic feedback in this context. Participants of diferent ages used diferent strategies and bodily modes of interaction in Sound Forest, with activities ranging from running to synchronized music-making and collaborative play.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM, 2019
Series
CHI ’19
Keywords
accessible digital musical instruments, evaluation of music systems, haptic feedback, music installations, music production
National Category
Media and Communication Technology Interaction Technologies Media Engineering Human Computer Interaction Music
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction; Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-250780 (URN)10.1145/3290605.3300907 (DOI)000474467908056 ()2-s2.0-85067628421 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Projects
Ljudskogen
Note

QC 20190625

Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Handberg, L., Elblaus, L., Chafe, C. & Canfield-Dafilou, E. K. (2018). Op 1254: Music for neutrons, networks and solenoids using a restored organ in a nuclear reactor. In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction: . Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 18 March 2018 through 21 March 2018 (pp. 537-541). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Op 1254: Music for neutrons, networks and solenoids using a restored organ in a nuclear reactor
2018 (English)In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 537-541Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, an installation is presented that connects Stanford and Stockholm through a one-of-a-kind combination of instrument and venue: the Skandia Wurlitzer theatre organ (Wurlitzer serial no. 1254) situated in the KTH R1 Experimental Performance Space, a disused nuclear reactor. A continuous stream of musical data, audio, and video between the two places explored the capabilities of the digital to play with the concepts of presence and embodiment, virtuality and the physical. In the installation, a series of performances presented new pieces written especially for this setting. The pieces were performed by musicians in Stanford, mediated in real-time, allowing them to play together with the theatre organ in Stockholm, temporarily fusing the two venues to create one ensemble, one audience, in one space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Algorithmic composition, Mediated musicianship, Musical instrument, Musification, Presence, Theatre organ
National Category
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228574 (URN)10.1145/3173225.3173304 (DOI)000476944600070 ()2-s2.0-85046782126 (Scopus ID)9781450355681 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 18 March 2018 through 21 March 2018
Note

QC 20180528

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, T., Helms, K., Tsaknaki, V., Elblaus, L. & Hansen, N. B. (2018). Sociomateriality: Infrastructuring and appropriation of artifacts. In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction: . Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 18 March 2018 through 21 March 2018 (pp. 724-727). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sociomateriality: Infrastructuring and appropriation of artifacts
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2018 (English)In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 724-727Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This Studio offers researchers and designers an opportunity to investigate and discuss prototypes and in-process projects from a perspective that expands beyond material aspects, to also cover social and cultural ones. Participants will bring a project, device, or platform, which will be discussed as sociomaterials that actively participate across multiple social and cultural contexts. This perspective, as well as the prototypes and projects brought by the participants, forms the core of the Studio, where conversation will emerge over several phases: from the demonstration of the individual projects as things, to the generation of speculative fictions as to the role and use of these artifacts in the world. Finally, we end with a discussion of infrastructuring and appropriation of the artefacts and their social roles. The themes that will be examined in this Studio are agency, emerging behaviors, embeddedness and design strategies from a sociomaterial perspective of artifacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Design, Design things, Infrastructuring, Materiality, Prototypes, Research through design, Sociomaterials
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228576 (URN)10.1145/3173225.3173330 (DOI)000476944600100 ()2-s2.0-85046771185 (Scopus ID)9781450355681 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 18 March 2018 through 21 March 2018
Note

QC 20180528

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L., Unander-Scharin, Å. & Unander-Scharin, C. (2017). Uncanny Materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads. Leonardo music journal, 27, 62-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncanny Materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads
2017 (English)In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 27, p. 62-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the medieval tradition of ballads, a recurring theme is that of transformation. In a staged concert for chamber orchestra, singers and dancers called Varelser och Ballader (Beings and Ballads), we explored this theme using ballads coupled with contemporary poetry and new music. The performance made use of custom-made digital musical instruments, using video analysis and large-scale physical interfaces for transformative purposes. In this article, we describe the piece itself as well as how uncanny qualities of the digital were used to emphasize eerie themes of transformation and deception by the supernatural beings found in the medieval ballads.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2017
National Category
Music
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220476 (URN)10.1162/LMJ_a_01020 (DOI)000416826400023 ()2-s2.0-85037632721 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171221

Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Paloranta, J., Lundström, A., Elblaus, L., Bresin, R. & Frid, E. (2016). Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting. In: Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg (Ed.), Sound and Music Computing 2016: . Paper presented at Sound and Music Computing 2016 (pp. 388-395). Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting
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2016 (English)In: Sound and Music Computing 2016 / [ed] Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg, Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4) , 2016, p. 388-395Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present a study of the interaction with a large sized string instrument intended for a large installation in a museum, with focus on encouraging creativity,learning, and providing engaging user experiences. In the study, nine participants were video recorded while interacting with the string on their own, followed by an interview focusing on their experiences, creativity, and the functionality of the string. In line with previous research, our results highlight the importance of designing for different levels of engagement (exploration, experimentation, challenge). However, results additionally show that these levels need to consider the users age and musical background as these profoundly affect the way the user plays with and experiences the string.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4), 2016
Series
Proceedings SMC, ISSN 2518-3672
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Media and Communication Technology Media Engineering Human Computer Interaction Interaction Technologies Music Performing Arts
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-193003 (URN)2-s2.0-85067632707 (Scopus ID)978-3-00-053700-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Sound and Music Computing 2016
Projects
Ljudskogen
Note

QC 20210913

Available from: 2016-09-24 Created: 2016-09-24 Last updated: 2022-06-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2659-0411

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