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Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Handberg, L., Elblaus, L., Chafe, C. & Canfield-Dafilou, E. K. (2018). Op 1254: Music for neutrons, networks and solenoids using a restored organ in a nuclear reactor. In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction: . Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 18 March 2018 through 21 March 2018 (pp. 537-541). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Op 1254: Music for neutrons, networks and solenoids using a restored organ in a nuclear reactor
2018 (English)In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 537-541Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, an installation is presented that connects Stanford and Stockholm through a one-of-a-kind combination of instrument and venue: the Skandia Wurlitzer theatre organ (Wurlitzer serial no. 1254) situated in the KTH R1 Experimental Performance Space, a disused nuclear reactor. A continuous stream of musical data, audio, and video between the two places explored the capabilities of the digital to play with the concepts of presence and embodiment, virtuality and the physical. In the installation, a series of performances presented new pieces written especially for this setting. The pieces were performed by musicians in Stanford, mediated in real-time, allowing them to play together with the theatre organ in Stockholm, temporarily fusing the two venues to create one ensemble, one audience, in one space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Algorithmic composition, Mediated musicianship, Musical instrument, Musification, Presence, Theatre organ
National Category
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228574 (URN)10.1145/3173225.3173304 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046782126 (Scopus ID)9781450355681 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 18 March 2018 through 21 March 2018
Note

QC 20180528

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Jenkins, T., Helms, K., Tsaknaki, V., Elblaus, L. & Hansen, N. B. (2018). Sociomateriality: Infrastructuring and appropriation of artifacts. In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction: . Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 18 March 2018 through 21 March 2018 (pp. 724-727). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sociomateriality: Infrastructuring and appropriation of artifacts
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2018 (English)In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 724-727Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This Studio offers researchers and designers an opportunity to investigate and discuss prototypes and in-process projects from a perspective that expands beyond material aspects, to also cover social and cultural ones. Participants will bring a project, device, or platform, which will be discussed as sociomaterials that actively participate across multiple social and cultural contexts. This perspective, as well as the prototypes and projects brought by the participants, forms the core of the Studio, where conversation will emerge over several phases: from the demonstration of the individual projects as things, to the generation of speculative fictions as to the role and use of these artifacts in the world. Finally, we end with a discussion of infrastructuring and appropriation of the artefacts and their social roles. The themes that will be examined in this Studio are agency, emerging behaviors, embeddedness and design strategies from a sociomaterial perspective of artifacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Design, Design things, Infrastructuring, Materiality, Prototypes, Research through design, Sociomaterials
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228576 (URN)10.1145/3173225.3173330 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046771185 (Scopus ID)9781450355681 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 18 March 2018 through 21 March 2018
Note

QC 20180528

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L., Unander-Scharin, Å. & Unander-Scharin, C. (2017). Uncanny Materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads. Leonardo music journal, 27, 62-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncanny Materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads
2017 (English)In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 27, p. 62-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the medieval tradition of ballads, a recurring theme is that of transformation. In a staged concert for chamber orchestra, singers and dancers called Varelser och Ballader (Beings and Ballads), we explored this theme using ballads coupled with contemporary poetry and new music. The performance made use of custom-made digital musical instruments, using video analysis and large-scale physical interfaces for transformative purposes. In this article, we describe the piece itself as well as how uncanny qualities of the digital were used to emphasize eerie themes of transformation and deception by the supernatural beings found in the medieval ballads.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2017
National Category
Music
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220476 (URN)10.1162/LMJ_a_01020 (DOI)000416826400023 ()2-s2.0-85037632721 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171221

Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Paloranta, J., Lundström, A., Elblaus, L., Bresin, R. & Frid, E. (2016). Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting. In: Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg (Ed.), Sound and Music Computing 2016: . Paper presented at Sound and Music Computing 2016 (pp. 388-395). Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting
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2016 (English)In: Sound and Music Computing 2016 / [ed] Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg, Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4) , 2016, p. 388-395Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present a study of the interaction with a large sized string instrument intended for a large installation in a museum, with focus on encouraging creativity,learning, and providing engaging user experiences. In the study, nine participants were video recorded while interacting with the string on their own, followed by an interview focusing on their experiences, creativity, and the functionality of the string. In line with previous research, our results highlight the importance of designing for different levels of engagement (exploration, experimentation, challenge). However, results additionally show that these levels need to consider the users age and musical background as these profoundly affect the way the user plays with and experiences the string.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4), 2016
Series
Proceedings SMC, ISSN 2518-3672
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Media and Communication Technology Media Engineering Human Computer Interaction Interaction Technologies Music Performing Arts
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-193003 (URN)978-3-00-053700-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Sound and Music Computing 2016
Projects
Ljudskogen
Note

QC 20161007

Available from: 2016-09-24 Created: 2016-09-24 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L., Unander-Scharin, Å. & Unander-Scharin, C. (2016). New Scenic Subjects: Explorations of a System of Autonomous On-Stage Observers. In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 265-268).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Scenic Subjects: Explorations of a System of Autonomous On-Stage Observers
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, p. 265-268Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192248 (URN)10.1145/2851581.2889470 (DOI)978-1-4503-4082-3 (ISBN)
External cooperation:
Conference
CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Note

QC 20160908

Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2016-09-08Bibliographically approved
Almqvist Gref, A., Elblaus, L. & Falkenberg Hansen, K. (2016). Sonification as Catalyst in Training Manual Wheelchair Operation for Sports and Everyday Life. In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2016: . Paper presented at Sound and Music Computing Conference (pp. 9-14). Sound and Music Computing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sonification as Catalyst in Training Manual Wheelchair Operation for Sports and Everyday Life
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2016, Sound and Music Computing , 2016, p. 9-14Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, a study on sonification of manual wheelchair movements is presented. The aim was to contribute to both rehabilitation contexts and in wheelchair sports contexts, by providing meaningful auditory feedback for training of manual wheelchair operation. A mapping approach was used where key parameters of manual wheelchair maneuvering were directly mapped to different sound models. The system was evaluated with a qualitative approach in experiments. The results indicate that there is promise in utilizing sonification for training of manual wheelchair operation but that the approach of direct sonification, as opposed to sonification of the deviation from a predefined goal, was not fully successful. Participants reported that there was a clear connection between their wheelchair operation and the auditory feedback, which indicates the possibility of using the system in some, but not all, wheelchair training contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sound and Music Computing, 2016
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192377 (URN)
Conference
Sound and Music Computing Conference
Note

QC 20160919

Available from: 2016-09-11 Created: 2016-09-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Bresin, R., Elblaus, L., Frid, E., Favero, F., Annersten, L., Berner, D. & Morreale, F. (2016). SOUND FOREST/LJUDSKOGEN: A LARGE-SCALE STRING-BASED INTERACTIVE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT. In: Sound and Music Computing 2016: . Paper presented at Sound and Music Computing 2016 (pp. 79-84). SMC Sound&Music Computing NETWORK
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SOUND FOREST/LJUDSKOGEN: A LARGE-SCALE STRING-BASED INTERACTIVE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
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2016 (English)In: Sound and Music Computing 2016, SMC Sound&Music Computing NETWORK , 2016, p. 79-84Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

 In this paper we present a string-based, interactive, largescale installation for a new museum dedicated to performing arts, Scenkonstmuseet, which will be inaugurated in 2017 in Stockholm, Sweden. The installation will occupy an entire room that measures 10x5 meters. We aim to create a digital musical instrument (DMI) that facilitates intuitive musical interaction, thereby enabling visitors to quickly start creating music either alone or together. The interface should be able to serve as a pedagogical tool; visitors should be able to learn about concepts related to music and music making by interacting with the DMI. Since the lifespan of the installation will be approximately five years, one main concern is to create an experience that will encourage visitors to return to the museum for continued instrument exploration. In other words, the DMI should be designed to facilitate long-term engagement. Finally, an important aspect in the design of the installation is that the DMI should be accessible and provide a rich experience for all museum visitors, regardless of age or abilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SMC Sound&Music Computing NETWORK, 2016
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Media Engineering Interaction Technologies Music Performing Arts
Research subject
Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192919 (URN)978-3-00-053700-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Sound and Music Computing 2016
Projects
Ljudskogen
Note

QC 20160926

Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L., Unander-Scharin, C. & Unander-Scharin, Å. (2016). Which Scenic Subjects may Emerge when Interacting With Machines Through Vocal and Bodily Virtuosity?. In: Annette Arlander (Ed.), Proceedings of CARPA4: Colloquium on Artistic Research in Performing Arts. Paper presented at CARPA4 - Colloquium on Artistic Research in Performing Arts. Theatre Academy Helsinki
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Which Scenic Subjects may Emerge when Interacting With Machines Through Vocal and Bodily Virtuosity?
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of CARPA4: Colloquium on Artistic Research in Performing Arts / [ed] Annette Arlander, Theatre Academy Helsinki , 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Theatre Academy Helsinki, 2016
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192249 (URN)978-952-6670-84-3 (ISBN)
Conference
CARPA4 - Colloquium on Artistic Research in Performing Arts
Note

QC 160921

Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2016-09-21Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L. (2015). Crafting New Interfaces for Musical Expression. (Licentiate dissertation). Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crafting New Interfaces for Musical Expression
2015 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis collects and contextualizes several projects involving artistically directed prototyping where new artifacts have been developed, in multi-disciplinary groups of practitioners, for use in performance contexts. These projects and their resulting publications have been team efforts, and therefore all papers have more than one author. In the introduction, a complementary perspective to that of the publications is offered, engaging with the characteristics of the digital innards of these artifacts and their digital material qualities. The stance that software source code is a design material is argued, and the notion of the crafting coder is used to view processes that use code as material for artistic creation. Code is also prominently featured in the introductory chapter with examples of some of the central components of the sound processing techniques that have been successfully used in the projects described in this thesis.

The artifacts that are described in the thesis are: The Throat, an instrument for augmenting the singing voice using gestural control in real-time, The Vocal Chorder, a string based instrument using full-body interaction that also allows for audience participation through an installation mode, The Charged Room, a video tracking installation that lets users manipulate sound by moving across a stage, and Nebula, a garment that senses the users movements and responds with sound. These artifacts have been evaluated in the context they are designed for, and not only tested in laboratory settings, to make sure that the knowledge produced is valid. Several performances and peda-gogical courses have been used as empirical foundation for the claims of empowerment, expressivity, and performance qualities ascribed to the developed artifacts.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015. p. xi, 43
Series
TRITA-CSC-A, ISSN 1653-5723 ; 2015:19
National Category
Media Engineering
Research subject
Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-176888 (URN)978-91-7595-784-5 (ISBN)
Presentation
2015-12-14, Fantum, Lindstedtsvägen 24, plan 5, KTH, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20151202

Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-11-11 Last updated: 2015-12-03Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L., Tsaknaki, V., Lewandowski, V. & Bresin, R. (2015). Nebula: An Interactive Garment Designed for Functional Aesthetics. In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI 2015 (pp. 275-278). New York, NY, USA: ACM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nebula: An Interactive Garment Designed for Functional Aesthetics
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY, USA: ACM , 2015, p. 275-278Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present Nebula, a prototype for examining the properties of textiles, fashion accessories, and digital technologies to arrive at a garment design that brings these elements together in a cohesive manner. Bridging the gap between everyday performativity and enactment, we aim at discussing aspects of the making process, interaction and functional aesthetics that emerged. Nebula is part of the Sound Clothes project that aims at exploring the expressive potential of wearable technologies creating sound from motion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2015
Series
CHI EA '15
Keywords
design process, fashion, music computation, wearable technology
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-170399 (URN)10.1145/2702613.2725454 (DOI)2-s2.0-84954230456 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-3146-3 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI 2015
Projects
SoundClothes
Note

QC 20150630

Available from: 2015-06-30 Created: 2015-06-30 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2659-0411

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