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Hedin, B. & Kann, V. (2019). Improving Study Skills by Combining a Study Skill Module and Repeated Reflection Seminars. Education Research International, Article ID 9739854.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving Study Skills by Combining a Study Skill Module and Repeated Reflection Seminars
2019 (English)In: Education Research International, ISSN 2090-4002, E-ISSN 2090-4010, article id 9739854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

If students have a broad spectrum of study skills, learning will likely be positively affected, since they can adapt the way they learn in different situations. Such study skills can be learned in, for example, learning-to-learn courses. Several studies of such courses have been done over the years, but few of these have been carried out in longitudinal naturalistic settings, where the effect has been evaluated over several years in nonexperimental settings. In this paper, we present a novel approach for learning study skills, as a part of a course running over three years. The course starts with a learning-to-learn module, followed by 11 follow-ups that include, among other things, peer discussions about learning strategies with the aim of promoting self-regulated learning. This evaluation shows which study skills the students were most interested in trying, how successful they were in continuing to use the study skills, and which effects the students believed the study skills had after trying them. No significant change was found in how satisfied the students were with their overall study technique immediately after the initial module, but in the long term, 78% of the students believed the course had promoted their ability to analyze and adapt their study habits. We conclude that our approach could be a useful way to get the students to improve their repertoire and use of study skills, and we believe that the students also will improve general self-regulated learning skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science; Technology and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246185 (URN)10.1155/2019/9739854 (DOI)000461626600001 ()2-s2.0-85063217918 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190318

Available from: 2019-03-14 Created: 2019-03-14 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, P., Baltatzis, A., Bälter, O., Enoksson, F., Hedin, B. & Riese, E. (2018). DRIVERS AND BARRIERS FOR PROMOTING TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION. In: Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC (Ed.), 12TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE (INTED): . Paper presented at 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (INTED), MAR 05-07, 2018, Valencia, SPAIN (pp. 4576-4584). IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DRIVERS AND BARRIERS FOR PROMOTING TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION
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2018 (English)In: 12TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE (INTED) / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2018, p. 4576-4584Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper presents a study were drivers and barriers for increased use of Technology Enhanced Learning in higher education were identified. The method included focus groups with Faculty Pedagogical Developers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, followed by a Force Field Analysis. Ten drivers and ten barriers were identified, and are presented in this paper. The most significant drivers found were: collegial discussions, increased automatization, Technology enhanced learning support for the teachers (to assist exploration), tech savvy students and engagement among faculty. The most significant barriers identified were: unclear return on time investment, insufficient funding for purchases and lack of central decisions. The analysis also revealed that some drivers and barriers could act both ways. One example is locally developed systems which are understood to be drivers when it comes to solving (local) problems and encouraging experimentation with IT systems, but when these local systems are cancelled due to lack of funding, or for example replaced by centralized systems, they discourage use and development. The findings constitute a foundation for future discussions about change processes to increase utilization of technology enhanced learning in higher education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT, 2018
Series
INTED Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1079
Keywords
Technology Enhanced Learning, Higher Education, Drivers, Barriers
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-238933 (URN)000447408804092 ()978-84-697-9480-7 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (INTED), MAR 05-07, 2018, Valencia, SPAIN
Note

QC 20181114

Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Viberg, O., Bälter, O., Hedin, B., Riese, E. & Mavroudi, A. (2018). Faculty pedagogical developers as enablers of technology‐enhanced learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faculty pedagogical developers as enablers of technology‐enhanced learning
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2018 (English)In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As the integration of digital technologies in higher education continues to increase, there is a need to understand how to best support university teachers as designers of technology‐enhanced learning (TEL) in order to support students to achieve academic success. In this study, we have examined the Faculty Pedagogical Developer Initiative at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, an innovative project to support a bottom‐up change process of teachers as designers of TEL, with the intent to strengthen the professional pedagogical development for the faculty. Data were collected from interviews and official documents. Actor–network theory was applied for the analysis. The results suggest that the initiative stimulated both practical implementation of digital technology in educational programmes and also spurred a debate about teachers as designers of TEL between these pedagogical developers and other teachers across different schools and subjects at KTH. However, there are important social, organisational and technical challenges that should be considered when developing support for university teachers as designers of TEL. This paper concludes that this process requires a deep understanding of four interrelated elements: information, technology, organisation and social arrangements.

National Category
Learning
Research subject
Technology and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235536 (URN)10.1111/bjet.12710 (DOI)
Note

QC 20181001

Available from: 2018-09-28 Created: 2018-09-28 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Hedin, B., Larsson, V. & Artman, H. (2018). Indoor temperature awareness using an Ambient Information Display: a semi-longitudinal study of one household. In: Birgit Penzenstadler, Steve Easterbrook, Colin Venters and Syed Ishtiaque Ahmed (Ed.), ICT4S2018. 5th International Conference on Information and Communication Technology for Sustainability: . Paper presented at 5th International Conference on ICT4S, May 15-17 2018, Toronto, Canada (pp. 112-124). , 52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indoor temperature awareness using an Ambient Information Display: a semi-longitudinal study of one household
2018 (English)In: ICT4S2018. 5th International Conference on Information and Communication Technology for Sustainability / [ed] Birgit Penzenstadler, Steve Easterbrook, Colin Venters and Syed Ishtiaque Ahmed, 2018, Vol. 52, p. 112-124Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the use of an Ambient Information Display (AID) to visualize indoor temperature, in order to promote behavior change through reflection and discussion. A prototype system was built using Philips Hue, a personal wireless LED lighting system, to visualize indoor temperature with colors, and an unused smartphone as temperature sensor. A household with a family of five was used as test environment. The design process underwent two major design iterations focusing on the visualization and its impact on the family’s everyday perception of the indoor temperature, and the reflective processes this triggered. After three months of usage, late December to late March, the system was evaluated thoroughly. The awareness of the indoor temperature had been increased with the use of the system, where the AID had served as a trigger for discussions.

National Category
Media and Communication Technology Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction; Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-247939 (URN)10.29007/8qd6 (DOI)
Conference
5th International Conference on ICT4S, May 15-17 2018, Toronto, Canada
Note

QC 20190329

Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, E. & Hedin, B. (2018). Smart interactions for the quantified self. In: Challenges and Solutions in Smart Learning: Proceeding of 2018 International Conference on Smart Learning Environments, Beijing, China (pp. 67-72). Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smart interactions for the quantified self
2018 (English)In: Challenges and Solutions in Smart Learning: Proceeding of 2018 International Conference on Smart Learning Environments, Beijing, China, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 67-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Quantified Self is a movement for collecting personal data with the goal of providing possibilities for new insights through reflecting on own relevant data, with applications in areas such as physical exercise, food, and health. When collecting personal data, difficulties may arise, such as information from different sources which cannot easily be combined, closed access to information sources, inflexible tooling for producing desired quantifications, varying precision of data used for producing quantifications, and a lack of control over data sharing for supporting relevant comparisons with others. In this paper, we introduce the concept of smart interactions, backed by linked data, as a means of introducing the QS through smart and personal learning environments, both for reducing the associated difficulties and further empowering the QS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing, 2018
Series
Lecture Notes in Educational Technology, ISSN 2196-4963
Keywords
Linked data, Personal learning environments, Quantified self, Smart interactions, Smart learning environments
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-224845 (URN)10.1007/978-981-10-8743-1_10 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043759933 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20180327

Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
Kjellgren, B., Havtun, H., Wingård, L., Andersson, M., Hedin, B., Hjelm, N. & Berglund, A. (2018). The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Sustainable Impact of Falling into Oblivion?. In: Bean Bennedsen, Edström, Hugo, Roslöf, Songer & Yamamoto (Ed.), Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO Conference: . Paper presented at The 14th International CDIO Conference (pp. 738-747). Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Sustainable Impact of Falling into Oblivion?
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO Conference / [ed] Bean Bennedsen, Edström, Hugo, Roslöf, Songer & Yamamoto, Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology , 2018, p. 738-747Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Between 2014-16, KTH Royal Institute of Technology set aside considerable resources in its biggest pedagogical project to date, the Pedagogical Developers Initiative. The project has been continuously reported on at recent CDIO conferences. While aimed primarily at CDIO Standard 10, enhancement of faculty teaching competence, the project managed, by design as much as through accident, to strengthen many CDIO standards and syllabus items. With the conclusion of the project, the constructive practices and ideas that emerged from the initiative were meant to be incorporated into the regular operations of the university, a task that was delegated to each of KTH’s ten schools. However, even though KTH officially labelled the project a success, the schools have taken a non-uniform approach to this endeavour, as they indeed had done to the project as a whole during its duration. Following up on our earlier reports, and primarily using data from interviews and our own observations, the paper looks at which of the initiative’s ideas and practices have survived the end of the project, in what forms, by what means, and what insights and lessons one can draw from this when designing mechanisms for continuous and sustainable improvement of pedagogical practices at a technical university.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 2018
Series
Proceedings of the International CDIO Conference, ISSN 2002-1593
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235509 (URN)
Conference
The 14th International CDIO Conference
Note

QC 20181008

Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Hedin, B. & Jorge Luis, Z. (2018). What Can You Do with 100 kWh? A Longitudinal Study of Using an Interactive Energy Comparison Tool to Increase Energy Awareness. Sustainability, 10(7), Article ID 2269.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Can You Do with 100 kWh? A Longitudinal Study of Using an Interactive Energy Comparison Tool to Increase Energy Awareness
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 2269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reducing the use of energy is important for several reasons, such as saving money and reducing impact on the climate. However, the awareness among non-experts of how much energy is required by different activities and appliances is generally low, which can lead to wrong prioritizations. In this study, we have developed an interactive tool to increase “energy awareness”, and performed a longitudinal study to evaluate its effect. A group of 58 students first did a test to benchmark their current energy awareness, where their current knowledge of energy used for 14 different activities, such as driving vehicles and using home appliances, was measured. They then tried the interactive learning tool for 10 min. Next, they did the same test immediately after trying the tool, then again one week after trying the tool, and finally again six months after trying the tool. The results showed a significant learning effect in energy awareness with a “huge” effect size of 2.25 immediately after the intervention, a “very large” effect size of 1.70 after one week, and a “large” effect size of 0.93 after six months. The results further showed that the respondents consistently underestimated what 100 kWh could be used for, and especially so for appliances and activities requiring little energy. Before the intervention, on average they underestimated how much 100 kWh could be used for by 95.2%, and six months after the intervention the underestimation was 86.8%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI AG, 2018
Keywords
energy awareness, technology enhanced learning, sustainable HCI, e-learning, energy conservation, energy literacy
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Pedagogy
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction; Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231766 (URN)10.3390/su10072269 (DOI)000440947600160 ()2-s2.0-85049384194 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Improved energy counceling and energy habits by Quantified Self Assisted Advisory
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 38208-1
Note

QC 20180702

Available from: 2018-07-02 Created: 2018-07-02 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Louis Zapico, J. & Hedin, B. (2017). Energy Weight: Tangible Interface for Increasing Energy Literacy. In: The Fifth IFIP Conference on Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability, Funchal, Portugal – December  6-7, 2017: . Paper presented at The Fifth IFIP Conference on Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability Funchal, Portugal – December 6-7, 2017. IEEE Computer Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy Weight: Tangible Interface for Increasing Energy Literacy
2017 (English)In: The Fifth IFIP Conference on Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability, Funchal, Portugal – December  6-7, 2017, IEEE Computer Society, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increasing energy literacy has been identified as an important topic in order to help people understand their energy use and thereby enabling them to reduce their energy use. We have developed a tangible interface for helping people learn about energy by using wooden blocks as representation of several common cases of energy use. These are then placed on a digital scale connected to a computer which visualizes how many solar panels are required to power these. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society, 2017
Keywords
Sustainable HCI, Energy Literacy, Tangible interfaces, Technology Enhanced Learning, Work in Progress
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-219814 (URN)10.23919/SustainIT.2017.8379807 (DOI)000436181400017 ()2-s2.0-85050029554 (Scopus ID)978-3-901882-99-9 (ISBN)
Conference
The Fifth IFIP Conference on Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability Funchal, Portugal – December 6-7, 2017
Projects
Förbättrad energirådgivning och förbättrade energivanor genom Quantified Self Assisted Advisory
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20180116

Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
Hedin, B. (2017). LCAFDB - A Crowdsourced Life Cycle Assessment Database for Food. In: The Fifth IFIP Conference on Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability, Funchal, Portugal – December  6-7, 2017: . Paper presented at The Fifth IFIP Conference on Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability Funchal, Portugal – December 6-7, 2017 (pp. 88-90). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LCAFDB - A Crowdsourced Life Cycle Assessment Database for Food
2017 (English)In: The Fifth IFIP Conference on Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability, Funchal, Portugal – December  6-7, 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, p. 88-90Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents LCAFDB, a crowdsourced database for collecting Life Cycle Assessment data for foodstuff. Such an open database is useful to facilitate the development of feedback systems about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for food. We describe the design challenges encountered while we developed the system and our solutions. We also exemplify by a number of applications developed that use this database. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017
Series
Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability, ISSN 2377-5580
Keywords
Sustainable HCI; LCA; Open Data; Food
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-219782 (URN)10.23919/SustainIT.2017.8379804 (DOI)000436181400014 ()2-s2.0-85050029660 (Scopus ID)9783901882999 (ISBN)
Conference
The Fifth IFIP Conference on Sustainable Internet and ICT for Sustainability Funchal, Portugal – December 6-7, 2017
Projects
Förbättrad energirådgivning och förbättrade energivanor genom Quantified Self Assisted Advisory
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20171218

Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
Berglund, A., Havtun, H., Jerbrant, A., Wingård, L., Andersson, M., Hedin, B. & Kjellgren, B. (2017). THE PEDAGOGICAL DEVELOPERS INITIATIVE: SYSTEMATIC SHIFTS, SERENDIPITIES, AND SETBACKS. In: 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22, 2017: . Paper presented at 13th International CDIO Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>THE PEDAGOGICAL DEVELOPERS INITIATIVE: SYSTEMATIC SHIFTS, SERENDIPITIES, AND SETBACKS
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2017 (English)In: 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22, 2017, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pedagogical projects have often, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, as well as elsewhere, been initiated and managed by individual enthusiasts rather than dedicated teams. This generally decreases the possibility of successful implementation of more ambitious ideas, e.g., changing educational programs, implementing the CDIO syllabus, or strengthening the pedagogical development of larger parts of the faculty. To enable wider and more effective change, KTH top management therefore launched a universityencompassing three-year project in 2014, in which a group of highly motivated teachers from all schools at KTH were appointed part-time pedagogical developers (PDs). The PDs were given the task of promoting pedagogical development and facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange among faculty members, as described in two previous papers at CDIO conferences. From 2017, the outcomes of this project are supposed to be integrated parts of the KTH line organization. The project has led to numerous actions, which would have been difficult to set in motion unless given the freedom in time to explore and to develop into a collective effort rather than a myriad of individual “stand-alone” examples. By addressing key areas for pedagogical development, our group of dedicated faculty have tried to surpass the suboptimal "lock-in" of strict individual reasoning and to deal with surfaced questions and relevant issues in a broader collective manner. A major insight confirmed by the project and its many sub-projects has indeed been the fundamental importance of collegial discussions and the creation of processes that facilitate and support teacher cooperation. We have also, through discussions with faculty at KTH, confirmed the need for clearly defined, tangible incentives for teachers, motivating them to participate in pedagogical development activities, even if this means less time left for the traditional pathway to rewards within academia, i.e. research. In this paper, we chart changes that have occurred in the educational practices at KTH by describing and discussing the project’s focus on pedagogical development of faculty, actual execution of changes in the engineering educations, lessons learned along the way, and visions yet to be realised.

Keywords
pedagogical developers, educational change, change agents, faculty development, CDIO standards
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-213962 (URN)
Conference
13th International CDIO Conference
Note

QC 20170919

Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6457-5231

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