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Hedin, B., Katzeff, C., Eriksson, E. & Pargman, D. (2019). A Systematic Review of Digital Behaviour Change Interventions for More Sustainable Food Consumption. Sustainability, 11(9), Article ID 2638.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Systematic Review of Digital Behaviour Change Interventions for More Sustainable Food Consumption
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 2638Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food production and consumption present major sustainability challenges, and finding ways to reduce the environmental impact of food, for example through behavioural changes by consumers, is becoming increasingly important. In recent years, digital interventions have become important tools to change behaviours in many areas. In this review, we evaluate the status of current scientific knowledge of digital behaviour change interventions for sustainable food consumption practices. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist for how to conduct systematic reviews, we searched multiple databases for papers containing terms related to food, sustainability and digital behaviour change interventions. Only studies where the digital interventions were actually implemented and evaluated from a behaviour change perspective were included, resulting in 15 primary studies in the final review. The quality of the studies was evaluated from a behaviour change perspective, and the approaches used were categorised using two intervention frameworks, the Behaviour Change Wheel and the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1. The results show that all of the included studies had major quality issues when evaluated from a behaviour change perspective. This means that we could not find any evidence regarding whether the digital behaviour change interventions examined worked or not. Most studies further lacked theoretical grounding or a clear approach to how or why they should be effective for behaviour change for more sustainable food consumption practices. Our main recommendation for future research in the field is to expand from the current exploratory phase to conducting scientifically rigorous studies of higher quality, more thoroughly grounded in behaviour change theory and methods. Furthermore, based on our study, we suggest changes to the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
sustainability, food, behaviour change, digital intervention, digital behaviour change, sustainable HCI, human computer interaction, Behaviour Change Wheel, Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy, systematic review, consumer behaviour
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255335 (URN)10.3390/su11092638 (DOI)000469518700186 ()2-s2.0-85066982513 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190731

Available from: 2019-07-31 Created: 2019-07-31 Last updated: 2019-07-31Bibliographically approved
Hedin, B. & Kann, V. (2019). Improving Study Skills by Combining a Study Skill Module and Repeated Reflection Seminars. Education Research International, Article ID 9739854.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving Study Skills by Combining a Study Skill Module and Repeated Reflection Seminars
2019 (English)In: Education Research International, ISSN 2090-4002, E-ISSN 2090-4010, article id 9739854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

If students have a broad spectrum of study skills, learning will likely be positively affected, since they can adapt the way they learn in different situations. Such study skills can be learned in, for example, learning-to-learn courses. Several studies of such courses have been done over the years, but few of these have been carried out in longitudinal naturalistic settings, where the effect has been evaluated over several years in nonexperimental settings. In this paper, we present a novel approach for learning study skills, as a part of a course running over three years. The course starts with a learning-to-learn module, followed by 11 follow-ups that include, among other things, peer discussions about learning strategies with the aim of promoting self-regulated learning. This evaluation shows which study skills the students were most interested in trying, how successful they were in continuing to use the study skills, and which effects the students believed the study skills had after trying them. No significant change was found in how satisfied the students were with their overall study technique immediately after the initial module, but in the long term, 78% of the students believed the course had promoted their ability to analyze and adapt their study habits. We conclude that our approach could be a useful way to get the students to improve their repertoire and use of study skills, and we believe that the students also will improve general self-regulated learning skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science; Technology and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246185 (URN)10.1155/2019/9739854 (DOI)000461626600001 ()2-s2.0-85063217918 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190318

Available from: 2019-03-14 Created: 2019-03-14 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Riese, E., Bälter, O., Hedin, B. & Kann, V. (2019). Programme Integrating Courses Fighting to Get Engineers to Reflect on Non-technical Topics. In: ITiCSE '19 Proceedings of the 2019 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education: . Paper presented at ITiCSE ’19,24rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, July 15-17, 2019, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK. (pp. 133-139). New York, NY, USA: ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Programme Integrating Courses Fighting to Get Engineers to Reflect on Non-technical Topics
2019 (English)In: ITiCSE '19 Proceedings of the 2019 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, New York, NY, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2019, p. 133-139Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Programme Integrating Courses (PICs) aim to tie students, teachers and courses in education programmes closer together. In this study, we investigate three PICs, as part of engineering programmes in computer science and media technology. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of how students and mentors experience the PICs with a focus on the assessment and the relationship between students, and students and mentors. We used a mixed method approach, interviewed 22 students and 6 mentors, and sent out questionnaires to all 25 mentors and all students from two of the three courses (630+470 students). The results showed that the students and mentors appreciated the social aspects of the courses, getting to know each other and share experiences. However, some were uncomfortable reflecting upon the given non-technical topics. On a general level, the students stated that their mentors assessed their reflections correctly but they were sceptical towards being graded on a scale other than pass/fail.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2019
Series
Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE, ISSN 1942-647X
Keywords
Programme integrating course; assessment, engineering students, reflection, higher education
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Computer Science; Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-258917 (URN)10.1145/3304221.3319754 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070857062 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-6895-7 (ISBN)
Conference
ITiCSE ’19,24rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, July 15-17, 2019, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.
Note

QC 20191107

Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-11-07Bibliographically approved
Bälter, O. & Hedin, B. (2019). Walking with Seminars. In: KTH SoTL 2019: . Paper presented at KTH SoTL 2019. Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walking with Seminars
2019 (English)In: KTH SoTL 2019, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose

Low levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are a growing health problem globally and physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of numerous ailments, cardiovascular disease and mortality. To counteract this, the Walking seminar was invented at KTH in 2015. It is a small step towards a less sedentary lifestyle for students and teachers. Several teachers have already adopted walking seminars, but since it can be perceived as unorthodox, at least before you have tried it yourself, we offer this workshop to give hand-on experience on how to conduct a walking seminar.

Work done/work in progress

We started by transforming an on-campus course into a blended course to make sure all participants had accessed the information that would be discussed during the seminar. These walking seminars were evaluated among 131 students and nine teachers leading the walking seminars (Bälter et al. 2018). The responses to the student survey and teacher interviews indicate that discussions, sense of well-being and the general quality of the seminar improved, regardless of how physically active participants were the rest of the time.

Results/observations/lessons learned

Students might be sceptical towards a walking seminar, before they have tried it. However, if introduced a day with pleasant conditions, very few are willing to go back to sitting indoors. There is some time lost for the organisation (putting on clothes, dropping of bags, opening doors), but since the discussions outdoors are way more intense than the indoor discussions, this more than makes up for the lost time. The methodology for walking seminars has evolved since its beginning and at this workshop you will get a feel for state-of-the-art when it comes to promoting and arranging a walking seminar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2019
Keywords
Course development, Peer learning, Student engagement and motivation
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-258436 (URN)
Conference
KTH SoTL 2019
Note

QC 20191105

Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-11-05Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, P., Baltatzis, A., Bälter, O., Enoksson, F., Hedin, B. & Riese, E. (2018). DRIVERS AND BARRIERS FOR PROMOTING TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION. In: Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC (Ed.), 12TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE (INTED): . Paper presented at 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (INTED), MAR 05-07, 2018, Valencia, SPAIN (pp. 4576-4584). IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DRIVERS AND BARRIERS FOR PROMOTING TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION
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2018 (English)In: 12TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE (INTED) / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2018, p. 4576-4584Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper presents a study were drivers and barriers for increased use of Technology Enhanced Learning in higher education were identified. The method included focus groups with Faculty Pedagogical Developers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, followed by a Force Field Analysis. Ten drivers and ten barriers were identified, and are presented in this paper. The most significant drivers found were: collegial discussions, increased automatization, Technology enhanced learning support for the teachers (to assist exploration), tech savvy students and engagement among faculty. The most significant barriers identified were: unclear return on time investment, insufficient funding for purchases and lack of central decisions. The analysis also revealed that some drivers and barriers could act both ways. One example is locally developed systems which are understood to be drivers when it comes to solving (local) problems and encouraging experimentation with IT systems, but when these local systems are cancelled due to lack of funding, or for example replaced by centralized systems, they discourage use and development. The findings constitute a foundation for future discussions about change processes to increase utilization of technology enhanced learning in higher education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT, 2018
Series
INTED Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1079
Keywords
Technology Enhanced Learning, Higher Education, Drivers, Barriers
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-238933 (URN)000447408804092 ()978-84-697-9480-7 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (INTED), MAR 05-07, 2018, Valencia, SPAIN
Note

QC 20181114

Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Viberg, O., Bälter, O., Hedin, B., Riese, E. & Mavroudi, A. (2018). Faculty pedagogical developers as enablers of technology‐enhanced learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faculty pedagogical developers as enablers of technology‐enhanced learning
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2018 (English)In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As the integration of digital technologies in higher education continues to increase, there is a need to understand how to best support university teachers as designers of technology‐enhanced learning (TEL) in order to support students to achieve academic success. In this study, we have examined the Faculty Pedagogical Developer Initiative at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, an innovative project to support a bottom‐up change process of teachers as designers of TEL, with the intent to strengthen the professional pedagogical development for the faculty. Data were collected from interviews and official documents. Actor–network theory was applied for the analysis. The results suggest that the initiative stimulated both practical implementation of digital technology in educational programmes and also spurred a debate about teachers as designers of TEL between these pedagogical developers and other teachers across different schools and subjects at KTH. However, there are important social, organisational and technical challenges that should be considered when developing support for university teachers as designers of TEL. This paper concludes that this process requires a deep understanding of four interrelated elements: information, technology, organisation and social arrangements.

National Category
Learning
Research subject
Technology and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235536 (URN)10.1111/bjet.12710 (DOI)000482504900034 ()2-s2.0-85054021997 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20181001

Available from: 2018-09-28 Created: 2018-09-28 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Hedin, B., Larsson, V. & Artman, H. (2018). Indoor temperature awareness using an Ambient Information Display: a semi-longitudinal study of one household. In: Birgit Penzenstadler, Steve Easterbrook, Colin Venters and Syed Ishtiaque Ahmed (Ed.), ICT4S2018. 5th International Conference on Information and Communication Technology for Sustainability: . Paper presented at 5th International Conference on ICT4S, May 15-17 2018, Toronto, Canada (pp. 112-124). , 52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indoor temperature awareness using an Ambient Information Display: a semi-longitudinal study of one household
2018 (English)In: ICT4S2018. 5th International Conference on Information and Communication Technology for Sustainability / [ed] Birgit Penzenstadler, Steve Easterbrook, Colin Venters and Syed Ishtiaque Ahmed, 2018, Vol. 52, p. 112-124Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the use of an Ambient Information Display (AID) to visualize indoor temperature, in order to promote behavior change through reflection and discussion. A prototype system was built using Philips Hue, a personal wireless LED lighting system, to visualize indoor temperature with colors, and an unused smartphone as temperature sensor. A household with a family of five was used as test environment. The design process underwent two major design iterations focusing on the visualization and its impact on the family’s everyday perception of the indoor temperature, and the reflective processes this triggered. After three months of usage, late December to late March, the system was evaluated thoroughly. The awareness of the indoor temperature had been increased with the use of the system, where the AID had served as a trigger for discussions.

National Category
Media and Communication Technology Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction; Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-247939 (URN)10.29007/8qd6 (DOI)
Conference
5th International Conference on ICT4S, May 15-17 2018, Toronto, Canada
Note

QC 20190329

Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, E. & Hedin, B. (2018). Smart interactions for the quantified self. In: Challenges and Solutions in Smart Learning: Proceeding of 2018 International Conference on Smart Learning Environments, Beijing, China (pp. 67-72). Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smart interactions for the quantified self
2018 (English)In: Challenges and Solutions in Smart Learning: Proceeding of 2018 International Conference on Smart Learning Environments, Beijing, China, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 67-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Quantified Self is a movement for collecting personal data with the goal of providing possibilities for new insights through reflecting on own relevant data, with applications in areas such as physical exercise, food, and health. When collecting personal data, difficulties may arise, such as information from different sources which cannot easily be combined, closed access to information sources, inflexible tooling for producing desired quantifications, varying precision of data used for producing quantifications, and a lack of control over data sharing for supporting relevant comparisons with others. In this paper, we introduce the concept of smart interactions, backed by linked data, as a means of introducing the QS through smart and personal learning environments, both for reducing the associated difficulties and further empowering the QS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing, 2018
Series
Lecture Notes in Educational Technology, ISSN 2196-4963
Keywords
Linked data, Personal learning environments, Quantified self, Smart interactions, Smart learning environments
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-224845 (URN)10.1007/978-981-10-8743-1_10 (DOI)000481658600010 ()2-s2.0-85043759933 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20180327

Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Kjellgren, B., Havtun, H., Wingård, L., Andersson, M., Hedin, B., Hjelm, N. & Berglund, A. (2018). The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Sustainable Impact of Falling into Oblivion?. In: Bean Bennedsen, Edström, Hugo, Roslöf, Songer & Yamamoto (Ed.), Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO Conference: . Paper presented at The 14th International CDIO Conference (pp. 738-747). Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Sustainable Impact of Falling into Oblivion?
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO Conference / [ed] Bean Bennedsen, Edström, Hugo, Roslöf, Songer & Yamamoto, Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology , 2018, p. 738-747Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Between 2014-16, KTH Royal Institute of Technology set aside considerable resources in its biggest pedagogical project to date, the Pedagogical Developers Initiative. The project has been continuously reported on at recent CDIO conferences. While aimed primarily at CDIO Standard 10, enhancement of faculty teaching competence, the project managed, by design as much as through accident, to strengthen many CDIO standards and syllabus items. With the conclusion of the project, the constructive practices and ideas that emerged from the initiative were meant to be incorporated into the regular operations of the university, a task that was delegated to each of KTH’s ten schools. However, even though KTH officially labelled the project a success, the schools have taken a non-uniform approach to this endeavour, as they indeed had done to the project as a whole during its duration. Following up on our earlier reports, and primarily using data from interviews and our own observations, the paper looks at which of the initiative’s ideas and practices have survived the end of the project, in what forms, by what means, and what insights and lessons one can draw from this when designing mechanisms for continuous and sustainable improvement of pedagogical practices at a technical university.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 2018
Series
Proceedings of the International CDIO Conference, ISSN 2002-1593
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235509 (URN)
Conference
The 14th International CDIO Conference
Note

QC 20181008

Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Hedin, B. & Jorge Luis, Z. (2018). What Can You Do with 100 kWh? A Longitudinal Study of Using an Interactive Energy Comparison Tool to Increase Energy Awareness. Sustainability, 10(7), Article ID 2269.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Can You Do with 100 kWh? A Longitudinal Study of Using an Interactive Energy Comparison Tool to Increase Energy Awareness
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 2269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reducing the use of energy is important for several reasons, such as saving money and reducing impact on the climate. However, the awareness among non-experts of how much energy is required by different activities and appliances is generally low, which can lead to wrong prioritizations. In this study, we have developed an interactive tool to increase “energy awareness”, and performed a longitudinal study to evaluate its effect. A group of 58 students first did a test to benchmark their current energy awareness, where their current knowledge of energy used for 14 different activities, such as driving vehicles and using home appliances, was measured. They then tried the interactive learning tool for 10 min. Next, they did the same test immediately after trying the tool, then again one week after trying the tool, and finally again six months after trying the tool. The results showed a significant learning effect in energy awareness with a “huge” effect size of 2.25 immediately after the intervention, a “very large” effect size of 1.70 after one week, and a “large” effect size of 0.93 after six months. The results further showed that the respondents consistently underestimated what 100 kWh could be used for, and especially so for appliances and activities requiring little energy. Before the intervention, on average they underestimated how much 100 kWh could be used for by 95.2%, and six months after the intervention the underestimation was 86.8%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI AG, 2018
Keywords
energy awareness, technology enhanced learning, sustainable HCI, e-learning, energy conservation, energy literacy
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Pedagogy
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction; Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-231766 (URN)10.3390/su10072269 (DOI)000440947600160 ()2-s2.0-85049384194 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Improved energy counceling and energy habits by Quantified Self Assisted Advisory
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 38208-1
Note

QC 20180702

Available from: 2018-07-02 Created: 2018-07-02 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6457-5231

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