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Publications (10 of 104) Show all publications
Avango, D. (2018). Extracting the future in Svalbard. In: Nina Wormbs (Ed.), Competing Arctic Futures: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives: (pp. 47-71). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extracting the future in Svalbard
2018 (English)In: Competing Arctic Futures: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives / [ed] Nina Wormbs, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 47-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Minerals are not resources in and of themselves, they are constructed as such through processes involving narratives about the future, produced by actors who wish to realize them. This book chapter analyzes how actors within industry successfully constructed the archipelago of Svalbard as a place for resource extraction at the turn of the century 1900. They made use of favorable historical contexts and enrolled investors and political supporters by rosy future visions about market opportunities and serving national interests. In 2018 most of these mines are abandoned, providing a fruitful point of departure for critically evaluating future visions of the Arctic as an arena for resource extraction and to consider the sustainability of communities built around resource extraction there.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018
Keywords
Arctic, Natural resources, Mining, Geopolitics, Futures
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239893 (URN)978-3-319-91617-0 (ISBN)
Projects
Assessing Arctic Futures
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20181205

Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Arlov, T. B., Avango, D. & Reymert, P. K. (2018). Gradmålingsstasjonen i Sorgfjorden: en kulturhistorisk dokumentasjon. Trondheim-Tromsø-Stockholm: KTH, NTNU & UNIS
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gradmålingsstasjonen i Sorgfjorden: en kulturhistorisk dokumentasjon
2018 (Norwegian)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Rapport från arkeologisk fältforskning vid Sorgfjorden, Svalbard, Juli 2017. Rapporten innehåller en dokumentation av lämningar från den svensk-ryska gradmätningsexpeditionen 1898-1902 i form av kartor, foto och textbeskrivningar. Arkeologisk fältdata finns tillgänlig hos Sysselmannen på Svalbard.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim-Tromsø-Stockholm: KTH, NTNU & UNIS, 2018. p. 99
Keywords
Sorgfjorden, Gradmätningsexpeditionen, Svalbard, Kulturarv, Återanvändning
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239894 (URN)
Note

QC 20181211

Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Avango, D. (2018). Historical Sites and Heritage in the Polar Regions. In: Mark Nuttall, Torben Røjle Christensen and Martin Siegert (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Polar Regions: (pp. 116-133). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Historical Sites and Heritage in the Polar Regions
2018 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook of the Polar Regions / [ed] Mark Nuttall, Torben Røjle Christensen and Martin Siegert, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 116-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Polar Regions of today are marked by the imprints from thousands of years of human activities, from the first peoples who settled there in the distant past to those who arrived more recently – e.g. explorers, industrialists, militaries, scientists. This chapter gives an overview of the material historical remains of past human activities in the Arctic and Antarctic and explains under which circumstances they have been recognized as cultural heritage sites, i.e. remains which different actors for various reasons have defined, protected and managed as such. The chapter is divided into two main sections, the first presenting an overview of the archaeological record in the Arctic from 20 000 BCE until the 20th century, and in the Antarctic (including the Sub-Antarctic) from the 18th century until present days. The second section discusses how stakeholders in the Polar Regions have dealt with these archaeological sites. Under which circumstances do historical remains in the Polar Regions become heritage and why?

The chapter shows that there is a wide variety of actors who work to protect historical remains as heritage and for different reasons – e.g. archaeologists and historians using them as sources for explaining historical change, state authorities for diversifying local economies and supporting local identity and tourism companies using them for creating new destinations. Thus the material legacies of the past in the polar areas should not only be understood as environmental problems but also as a potential resource for building sustainable futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Cultural heritage, Heritagization, Arctic, Antarctic, History
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239895 (URN)
Projects
Mining heritage as a resource for sustainable communities
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research Council
Note

QC 20181205

Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Avango, D. & Brugmans, P. (2018). Opp og ned i 100 år: Sveagruva 1917-2017. Longyearbyen: Svalbard Museum
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opp og ned i 100 år: Sveagruva 1917-2017
2018 (Norwegian)Book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Longyearbyen: Svalbard Museum, 2018
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239896 (URN)
Projects
Colonial natural resources and Swedish foreign policy 1914-1989
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Note

QC 20181205

Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Avango, D., Högselius, P. & Nilsson, D. (2018). Swedish Explorers, In-Situ Knowledge, and Resource-Based Business in the Age of Empire. Scandinavian Journal of History, 43, 324-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Explorers, In-Situ Knowledge, and Resource-Based Business in the Age of Empire
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 43, p. 324-347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The period from 1870 to 1914 plays a unique role in the history of natural resource exploration and extraction. This article analyses, from a Swedish viewpoint, the connections between two actor categories of special importance in this context: scientific-geographical explorers and industrial actors. The article examines their activities in three broadly defined regions: the Arctic, Russia, and Africa. We show that the Swedes generally had far-reaching ambitions, on par with those of the large imperial powers. In some cases, notably in Africa, Sweden was not able to compete with the larger imperial powers; but in other cases, such as the exploration of the Arctic – from Spitsbergen to Siberia – and the industrial exploitation of coal at Spitsbergen and petroleum in Russia’s colonial periphery, Swedish actors played a leading role, in competition with players from the larger European nations. Our paper shows that scientific exploration and industry were closely linked, and that foreign policy also influenced the shaping of these links. We distinguish different types of knowledge produced by the Swedish actors, pointing to local, situated knowledge as the most important type for many resource-based businesses, although modern, scientific knowledge was on the increase during this period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Sweden, natural resources, in-situ knowledge, field sciences, industry, colonialism
National Category
History of Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-215503 (URN)10.1080/03468755.2017.1380923 (DOI)000433995700002 ()2-s2.0-85030853002 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Sweden and the origins of natural resource colonialism
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-33144-92725-40
Note

QC 20171019

Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Avango, D. (2016). Acting artefacts: on the meanings of material culture in Antarctica." In Antarctica and the Humanities. In: Peder Roberts, Adrian Howkins and Lize-Marie Van der Watt (Ed.), Antarctica and the Humanities: (pp. 159-179). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acting artefacts: on the meanings of material culture in Antarctica." In Antarctica and the Humanities
2016 (English)In: Antarctica and the Humanities / [ed] Peder Roberts, Adrian Howkins and Lize-Marie Van der Watt, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 159-179Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Remains of human activity in Antarctica are generally treated in two different ways – either as unwanted imprints polluting a pristine natural environment, objects alien to the continent which must be removed, or as cultural heritage which needs to be preserved. For this reason artefacts of potentially great importance for understanding and explaining the history of Antarctica are removed, while sites of arguably lesser universal value are preserved as heritage. The objective of this article is to argue for greater caution when assessing what should be treated as trash or heritage in the Antarctic. Before decisions are made to remove remains of human activities there, greater attention should be paid to the fact that these remains may acquire value in the future. Building on theoretical approaches within the fields of industrial heritage studies, history of technology and archaeology, my point of departure is an understanding that material culture can be connected with a multitude of meanings and values, depending on who is reading it and when. Remains of human activities can be ascribed values if there are actors who want to include them as part of their networks and in a historical context that works in their favor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016
Keywords
Antarctica, whaling, heritage, geopolitics, actor-network theory, LASHIPA
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-193129 (URN)978-1-137-54574-9 (ISBN)
Projects
LASHIPA - Large Scale Historical Exploitation of Polar Areas
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Note

QC 20161013

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2016-10-13Bibliographically approved
Avango, D. (2016). Att konstruera naturresurser: industriella framtidsvisioner om Svalbard 1870-1930. Ottar, 131(2), 41-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att konstruera naturresurser: industriella framtidsvisioner om Svalbard 1870-1930
2016 (Swedish)In: Ottar, ISSN 0030-6703, Vol. 131, no 2, p. 41-49Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tromsö: , 2016
Keywords
Gruvdrift, Arktis, Svalbard, Social konstruktion av naturrresurser, geopolitik
National Category
History of Technology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-188776 (URN)
Projects
REXSAC - Resource Extraction and Sustainable Arctic CommunitiesMASD - Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development
Funder
Nordic Council of MinistersMistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20160617

Available from: 2016-06-17 Created: 2016-06-17 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Hacquebord, L. & Avango, D. (2016). Industrial heritage sites in Spitsbergen (Svalbard), South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula: Sources of historical information. Polar Science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industrial heritage sites in Spitsbergen (Svalbard), South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula: Sources of historical information
2016 (English)In: Polar Science, ISSN 1873-9652, E-ISSN 1876-4428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Industrial heritage sites in Polar Regions are very important as sources of historical information. Togetherwith archival documents this information gives us the possibility to complete the picture of theexploitation of natural resources in those regions. Thirty years of historical-archaeological field researchat whaling and mining sites in Spitsbergen (Svalbard), South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula hasshown that these sites can provide unique evidence about the driving forces behind industrial development,the design of industrial technology, the structure of the settlements, strategies to control naturalresources and achieve political influence, and the impact of resource extraction on the local environment.In this article we will give examples of the results of our research at these sites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Arctic, Antarctic, Natural Resources, Industrial Archeology, Geopolitics
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-189012 (URN)10.1016/j.polar.2016.06.005 (DOI)000384861800028 ()2-s2.0-84977520229 (Scopus ID)
Projects
LASHIPA project
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

QC 20160713

Available from: 2016-06-26 Created: 2016-06-26 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Avango, D. & Roberts, P. (2016). Resource extraction and sustainable arctic communities. TICCIH bulletin / The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, 71, 12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resource extraction and sustainable arctic communities
2016 (English)In: TICCIH bulletin / The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, ISSN 1605-6647, Vol. 71, p. 12-Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, 2016
Keywords
Mining, Industrial Heritage, Arctic, Sustainable development, Kiruna, Greenland, Svalbard
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-183433 (URN)
Projects
Resource extraction and sustainable arctic communities
Funder
Nordic Council of Ministers
Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2017-03-28Bibliographically approved
Avango, D., Högselius, P. & Vikström, H. (2015). Colonizing the poles. Seminar : the monthly symposium
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Colonizing the poles
2015 (English)In: Seminar : the monthly symposium, ISSN 0037-1947Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New Delhi: Seminar Publications, 2015
Keywords
Climate change, Arctic, Antarctic, Natural Resources, Climate determinism
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-183431 (URN)
Projects
Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20160311

Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2016-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6461-7734

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