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Hartell, E. & Skogh, I.-B. (2015). Criteria for Success: A study of primary teachers' assessment of e-portfolios. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Criteria for Success: A study of primary teachers' assessment of e-portfolios
2015 (English)In: Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 1449-3098, E-ISSN 1449-5554Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transparency regarding criteria for success in assessment processes is challenging for most teachers. The context of this study is primary school technology education. With the purpose to establish what criteria for success teachers put forward during the act of assessment, think-aloud protocols were collected from five primary teachers during an assessment act. Results are based on content analysis of think-aloud protocols and quantitative measures of reliability in order to ascertain teachers’ motives for decision-making when assessing Year 5 pupils’ multimodal e-portfolios.

Findings show consensus among these teachers, focusing on the execution of the task in relation to the whole, rather than to particular pieces of student work. The results confirm the importance of task design, where active learning in combination with active tutoring is an integral part, including provision of time and space for pupils to finish their work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Waikato: University of Waikato, 2015
Keywords
Assessment, technology education, primary school, e-portfolio, adaptive comparative judgments, teachers, bedömning, e-portföljer, digitalt lärande, grundskola, teknik, parvisa jämförelser, teknikdidaktik, teknikundervisning, lärares bedömning, betygssättning
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-160094 (URN)10.15663/ajte.v2i1.27 (DOI)
Note

QC 20150901

Available from: 2015-02-13 Created: 2015-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Leino Lindell, T., Hrastinski, S. & Skogh, I.-B. (2015). Exploring students’ Multimodal mobile use as support for school assignments. In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition; Washington Convention CenterSeattle; United States. , 122(122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring students’ Multimodal mobile use as support for school assignments
2015 (English)In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2015, Vol. 122, no 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for SocietyConference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper engages with how students use multimodality on mobile devices as support for school assignments. The broader aim of this pilot study is to explore understanding of teachers’ and students’ expressed experiences of students’ multimodal mobile use. Focus group interviews and multimodal analysis have allowed investigation of the following research questions: - What experiences do teachers and students express from students’ multimodal mobile use related to school assignments? - Which advantages and disadvantages have teachers and students expressed concerning students’ multimodal mobile use as support for school assignments? The results show that students and teachers have many different experiences of students’ multimodal mobile use related to school assignments. However, the use is limited in several ways. To a large extent teachers and students have expressed that multimodal mobile resources can be used advantageously by students to support school assignments for several purposes. Among disadvantages identified mobile device multimodality in some respects can be disruptive. The result also indicates that different multimodal mobile media have specific possibilities for supporting students’ learning as it is related to school assignments.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-174736 (URN)2-s2.0-84941996019 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition; Washington Convention CenterSeattle; United States
Note

QC 20151013

Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2017-02-08Bibliographically approved
Edvardsson Björnberg, K., Skogh, I.-B. & Strömberg, E. (2015). Integrating social sustainability in engineering education at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 16(5), 639-649
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating social sustainability in engineering education at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 639-649Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate what are perceived to be the main challenges associated with the integration of social sustainability into engineering education at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. Design/methodology/approach - Semi-structured interviews were conducted with programme leaders and teachers from four engineering programmes. The paper focuses on how the concept of social sustainability is defined and operationalised in the selected engineering programmes, how social sustainability is integrated and taught, and what resources are required to support teachers and programme leaders as social sustainability educators. Findings - The findings show that programme leaders and teachers at KTH struggle to understand the concept of social sustainability. The vague and value-laden nature of the concept is considered a challenge when operationalising educational policy goals on social sustainability into effective learning outcomes and activities. A consequence is that the responsibility for lesson content ultimately falls on the individual teacher. Study visits and role-play are seen as the most effective tools when integrating social sustainability into the engineering curriculum. Allocation of specific resources including supplementary sustainability training for teachers and economic incentives are considered crucial to successful integration of social sustainability. The findings indicate that social sustainability education needs to be built on a theoretical foundation. It is therefore suggested that a literature canon be established that clarifies the contours of social sustainability. Practical implications - The findings of the paper can be used as a basis for discussion regarding measures for improving social sustainability training in engineering education, a subject which has attracted relatively little attention, to date. Originality/value - There is a noticeable lack of empirical research on how technical universities integrate social sustainability into engineering education. The paper provides an account of how actors directly involved in this work - programme leaders and teachers - define and operationalise the social dimension of sustainable development in their engineering curricula, the pedagogical tools they consider effective when teaching social sustainability issues to engineering students, and the resources they believe are needed to strengthen those efforts.

Keywords
Social sustainability, Integration, Sustainable development, Curriculum design, Engineering education
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-174000 (URN)10.1108/IJSHE-01-2014-0010 (DOI)000360573000003 ()2-s2.0-84938375596 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150930

Available from: 2015-09-30 Created: 2015-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Skogh, I.-B. (2015). Student 69 - i en brytningstid (1:aed.). In: Lennart Ragnvaldson (Ed.), Från avveckling till utveckling: Nya Elementar 1950-2015 (pp. 64-66). Stockholm: Föreningen Nya Elementarare
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student 69 - i en brytningstid
2015 (Swedish)In: Från avveckling till utveckling: Nya Elementar 1950-2015 / [ed] Lennart Ragnvaldson, Stockholm: Föreningen Nya Elementarare , 2015, 1:a, p. 64-66Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Föreningen Nya Elementarare, 2015 Edition: 1:a
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-182440 (URN)978-91-971199-9-3 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20160404

Available from: 2016-02-18 Created: 2016-02-18 Last updated: 2016-04-04Bibliographically approved
Skogh, I.-B. (2015). Uppdrag: Teknikmedvetna barn (1:aed.). In: Ann S. Pihlgren (Ed.), Fritidshemmet och skolan: Det gemensamma uppdraget (pp. 303-321). Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uppdrag: Teknikmedvetna barn
2015 (Swedish)In: Fritidshemmet och skolan: Det gemensamma uppdraget / [ed] Ann S. Pihlgren, Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1:a, p. 303-321Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Kapitlet Uppdrag: teknikmedvetna barn beskriverhur fritidshem och skola kan samarbeta tematiskt för att utveckla elevers förtsåelse av och kunskap om teknik.Teknikförståelse hos svenska barn är inte så utvecklad och teknikämnet får lätt en undanskymd plats i undervisningen trots dess vikt. Med utgångspunkt i temaområdet Hållbar utveckling ger författaren läsaren teoretiska redskap att förstå vad som är viktigt i teknikundervisningen genom att omsätta teorier i praktik på fritidshemmet och i skolan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Studentlitteratur AB, 2015 Edition: 1:a
Keywords
Teknikundervisning, fritidshem, skola, hållbar utveckling
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-182423 (URN)978-91-44-10093-7 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20160226

Available from: 2016-02-18 Created: 2016-02-18 Last updated: 2016-02-26Bibliographically approved
Gumaelius, L. & Skogh, I.-B. (2015). Work plans in technology: A study of technology education practice in Sweden. In: Chatoney, M. (Ed.) Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design and Technology Education: . Paper presented at 29th PATT Conference. Marseille, France. 7-10 April, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work plans in technology: A study of technology education practice in Sweden
2015 (English)In: Chatoney, M. (Ed.) Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design and Technology Education, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-206438 (URN)
Conference
29th PATT Conference. Marseille, France. 7-10 April, 2015.
Note

QC 20170508

Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-08Bibliographically approved
Hartell, E. & Skogh, I.-B. (2014). Criteria for Success Emphasized by Primary Technology Teachers. In: Howard Middleton (Ed.), Technology Education: Learning for life. Volume One. Paper presented at 8th Biennial International Conference on Technology Education Research Sydney, Australia, 26-29 November 2014 (pp. 113-122). Sydney Australia: Griffith University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Criteria for Success Emphasized by Primary Technology Teachers
2014 (English)In: Technology Education: Learning for life. Volume One / [ed] Howard Middleton, Sydney Australia: Griffith University , 2014, p. 113-122Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Teachers work with assessment in various ways with the intention of moving their pupils forward. However, moving pupils forward is not always beneficial for learning, as the direction of forward matters too, as well as knowing when arrived. Especially when the purpose of assessment is to move the learners forward towards learning intentions aligned to the curriculum, it gets complicated. When handled with care, feedback has been identified as a key strategy for learning. However, the results of feedback are difficult to foresee. Criteria for success play an important role for feedback, as every pupil benefit of transparency regarding learning intentions and criteria for success. This paper presents findings from an on-going study, on what criteria for success primary school teachers express during an assessment act. The context of our study is primary school technology education in Sweden, and the objects of study are think-aloud protocols collected from five teachers while assessing 22 pupils’ multimodal e-portfolios. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sydney Australia: Griffith University, 2014
Keywords
Technology education, criteria for success, teacher-based assessment, adaptive comparative judgement, feedback, primary education, e-portfolios, teknikdidaktik, bedömning, parvisa jämförelser, klassrumsbedömning, e-portföljer, grundskola
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-157739 (URN)978-0-9942027-0-3 (ISBN)
Conference
8th Biennial International Conference on Technology Education Research Sydney, Australia, 26-29 November 2014
Note

QC 20141215

Available from: 2014-12-14 Created: 2014-12-14 Last updated: 2015-03-04Bibliographically approved
Rolandsson, L. & Skogh, I.-B. (2014). Programming in School: Look Back to Move Forward. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 14(2), 12:1-12:25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Programming in School: Look Back to Move Forward
2014 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 12:1-12:25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, the development of the Swedish informatics curriculum during the 1970s, 1980s and 1990sis studied and described. The study’s design is inspired by the curriculum theory presented by Lindensj¨oand Lundgren [2000], who suggest using the concept of arenas (the arenas of enactment, transformationand realisation) when discussing curriculum development. Data collection in this study comprises activitiesand actors in the arenas of enactment and transformation. Collected data include contemporary articles,journals, reports, booklets, government documents and archived documents. Findings show that informaticseducation in Sweden evolved from primarily focusing on programming knowledge related to automatic dataprocessing and offered exclusively in vocational education (the 1960s and 1970s) to later (early 1980s) beingintroduced in the upper secondary school curriculum under the heading Datakunskap. The enactment of theinformatics curriculum in 1983 encompassed programming, system development and computing in relationto applied sciences and civics. Mathematics teachers did much of the experimental work. It is shown that thecompetencies of upper secondary school teachers at the time rarely corresponded to the demands of the subject(content knowledge, resources and pedagogical skills). Stereotypical examples were therefore developedto support teachers in instructing about the subject content. When implemented in the theoretical naturalscience-programme, system development/systemisation was transformed into a twofold issue, comprisingvocational attributes and societal aspects of computer programming. The implementation of today’s informaticseducation, including programming in the curriculum, should draw from lessons learned from history.For a successful outcome, this study emphasises the necessity to understand 1) the common incentives forintroducing computer programming in the curriculum, 2) the requirement for teachers’ pedagogical contentknowledge and 3) the stakeholders’ role in the curriculum development process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014
Keywords
Computer programming, automatic data processing (ADP), upper secondary school, teacher, curriculum development, informatics education, National Board of Education, Ministry of Education
National Category
Pedagogy Didactics
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-160717 (URN)10.1145/2602487 (DOI)2-s2.0-84905856931 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150227

Available from: 2015-02-26 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Inga-Britt, S., Gumaelius, L. & Geschwind, L. (2013). Education for Sustainable Development in Compulsory School Technology Education: A problem inventory. In: P John Williams (Ed.), Technology Education for the Future: A Play on Sustainability. Paper presented at The PATT 27 conference, 2-6 December, Christchurch, NZ. Waikato: University of Waikato, New Zealand
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education for Sustainable Development in Compulsory School Technology Education: A problem inventory
2013 (English)In: Technology Education for the Future: A Play on Sustainability / [ed] P John Williams, Waikato: University of Waikato, New Zealand , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Awareness of sustainability issues is increasingly demanded in society. Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is a requirement stated in the Swedish curriculum. Findings (Schools Inspectorate, 2012) indicate considerable variations in how teachers in Sweden work with value related issues. It is also found that schools/teachers commonly lack a holistic approach and a common stance in this assignment. Reportedly ESD seems dependent on the personal interests and abilities of individual teachers (ibid.). In order to develop teaching about sustainable development within the Technology subject we need knowledge about how ESD is carried out today (content and work methods). We also need to know how the concept of sustainability is interpreted by concerned key actors in schools (teachers and principals). During the spring of 2013 a pilot study focusing technology teachers’ work with sustainable development within their technology classes is being performed. Based on interviews (teachers and principals) we analyze what are perceived to be the main difficulties associated with the integration of sustainability into technology education. Findings confirm previous research stating that knowledge about sustainability is vague among teachers. Most teachers and principals in the study are primarily (in some cases only) aware of the environmental/ecological aspect of sustainability. The study also points to a discrepancy between perceived and actual need for improving teachers’ competence in ESD. Since ESD is not well defined, fully understood and established among those responsible for the actual teaching there is an evident risk of ESD being treated as ‘one further requirement’ rather than as the asset it actually represents to technology education. It is suggested is that the planning, organization and implementation of future ESD efforts must be coordinated carefully with all concerned parties in advance and be supported more substantially than previous efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Waikato: University of Waikato, New Zealand, 2013
Keywords
Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), Technology Education, Compulsory School, Teachers, Principals
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-168282 (URN)978-0-9922497-2-4 (ISBN)
Conference
The PATT 27 conference, 2-6 December, Christchurch, NZ
Note

QC 20150617

Available from: 2015-05-31 Created: 2015-05-31 Last updated: 2016-02-26Bibliographically approved
Edvardsson Björnberg, K., Skogh, I.-B. & Strömberg, E. (2013). Integrating social sustainability into the engineering curriculum at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH): A pilot study. In: : . Paper presented at EESD 2013 Engineering Education for Sustainable Development; Cambridge, U.K., 22-25 September, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating social sustainability into the engineering curriculum at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH): A pilot study
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, significant efforts have been made at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm to integrate sustainable development in the university’s Bachelor and Master education. However, a self-evaluation study carried out in 2012 showed that many programme coordinators and teachers at KTH still struggle with how to integrate social sustainability in their programmes. Based on interviews with programme coordinators at four engineering programmes at KTH we analyse what are perceived to be the main challenges associated with integration of social sustainability in the university’s engineering education. The paper reports on data acquired through the interviews, focusing on three questions: (1) How is the concept of social sustainability defined and operationalized in the selected engineering programmes? (2) How is social sustainability taught in the selected engineering programmes (learning objectives, teaching methods, pedagogical strategies/tools)? (3) What resources (training efforts, material/tools, etc.) are (according to the informants) required in order to support teachers and programming coordinators in their professional roles as (social) sustainability educators?

National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-136385 (URN)
Conference
EESD 2013 Engineering Education for Sustainable Development; Cambridge, U.K., 22-25 September, 2013
Note

QC 20140219

Available from: 2013-12-04 Created: 2013-12-04 Last updated: 2014-02-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3973-3466

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