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Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Svensson, D. (2016). Review of License to Jump! A Story of Women’s Ski Jumping [Review]. Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review of License to Jump! A Story of Women’s Ski Jumping
2016 (English)In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: idrottsforum.org, 2016
Keyword
history, sportification, ski jumping, gender, equality
National Category
History
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-187921 (URN)
Note

QC 20160602

Available from: 2016-06-01 Created: 2016-06-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D. (2015). An Even Colder War?: Specialization, Scientification and Gender in the Training Methods of Cross-Country Skiing from the 1950s. In: : . Paper presented at Bend it like Europe (1945-1989) –Sports, Politics and the Cold War, Vth Meeting of Young Historians, Barcelona.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Even Colder War?: Specialization, Scientification and Gender in the Training Methods of Cross-Country Skiing from the 1950s
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Cold War era was also an era of scientific and rational training methods in sports, especially in cross-country skiing. As competition hardened through the rise of Soviet and DDR skiers, other nations had to adapt. Sweden did so by changing training ideology, from natural to scientific training, in the early 1950s. By teaming up with physiologists, the Swedish Ski Federation wanted access to scientific, rational training to stay competitive. The methods proposed were not only interesting for sports, but also for military purposes. Some of the research was even funded by military organizations. The Cold War contributed in two ways to training – an increased military interest in training, as well as an increased competition in international cross-country skiing that resulted in an accelerated rationalization of training.

Keyword
Cold War, cross-country skiing, training, physiology, high altitude
National Category
History
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-172307 (URN)
Conference
Bend it like Europe (1945-1989) –Sports, Politics and the Cold War, Vth Meeting of Young Historians, Barcelona
Projects
Rationell träning
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Note

QC 20150818

Available from: 2015-08-17 Created: 2015-08-17 Last updated: 2015-08-18Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D. & Oppenheim, F. (2015). Etta på bollen: Historien om Öxabäcks damlag. Landvetter: Oppenheim
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Etta på bollen: Historien om Öxabäcks damlag
2015 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Fotboll är världens största sport. Men bland allt det stora (pengar, arenor, turneringar) finns också något annat, viktigare. Idrottens själ, numera svårfunnen på de största arenorna. Fotbollens rötter finns ofta på mindre orter – som Öxabäck.

I drygt 30 år var lilla Öxabäcks IF ett av Sveriges främsta damfotbollslag. Trots ett begränsat befolkningsunderlag, knappa ekonomiska resurser och konkurrens från betydligt större orter. Vad var det som gjorde att just Öxabäck blev centrum för svensk damfotboll?

I den här boken följer vi utveckingen från starten 1966, när ett gäng väninnor efter en danskväll i Borås trotsade rådande normer och drog igång vad som skulle bli Sveriges bästa lag. Hör spelare, tränare, styrelsemedlemmar och Öxabäcksbor berätta om lagets uppgång, storhetstid och fall.Detta är historien om Öxabäck, en liten by med ett mycket stort idrottsarv

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Landvetter: Oppenheim, 2015. p. 158
Keyword
Öxabäck, fotboll, landsbygd, jämställdhet
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-173830 (URN)978-91-981589-4-6 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20150922

Available from: 2015-09-18 Created: 2015-09-18 Last updated: 2015-09-22Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D. (2015). Fjällens rörelsearv: Hållbar fjällutveckling och lokal kunskap. In: : . Paper presented at Kunskapskonferensen Storslagen fjällmiljö, Ammarnäs-Sorsele, February 4-5, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fjällens rörelsearv: Hållbar fjällutveckling och lokal kunskap
2015 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-168220 (URN)
Conference
Kunskapskonferensen Storslagen fjällmiljö, Ammarnäs-Sorsele, February 4-5, 2015
Projects
Fjällens rörelsearv: diskreta monument i hållbar fjällutveckling
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection AgencyMistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20150608

Available from: 2015-05-28 Created: 2015-05-28 Last updated: 2015-06-08Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D. (2015). När träningen blev rationell. Vasalöparen (3), 46-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>När träningen blev rationell
2015 (Swedish)In: Vasalöparen, ISSN 0283-5533, no 3, p. 46-48Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mora: Vasaloppet Marknads AB, 2015
Keyword
träning, vetenskap, skidåkning, rationalisering, Gösta Olander
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-169683 (URN)
Projects
Rationell träning: Vetenskapliggörandet av träning för längdskidåkning
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Note

QC 20150622

Available from: 2015-06-22 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2015-06-22Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D. & Sörlin, S. (2015). Science, sport et environnement: Le développement des techniques d’entraînement en altitude depuis 1945 (1ed.). In: Grégory Quin, Anaïs Bohuon (Ed.), Les liaisons dangereuses de la médecine et du sport: (pp. 193-212). Paris: Editions Glyphe
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Science, sport et environnement: Le développement des techniques d’entraînement en altitude depuis 1945
2015 (French)In: Les liaisons dangereuses de la médecine et du sport / [ed] Grégory Quin, Anaïs Bohuon, Paris: Editions Glyphe, 2015, 1, p. 193-212Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Today, most elite endurance athletes use high-altitude training to some extent. For at least the last 40 years, it has been linked to increased performance. But how was high-altitude training established as a means of improving performance? And how did the scientific approach to altitude differ from the traditional, natural valuation of mountains as a site for training?

High-altitude training was introduced in sports in the post-war period. During the 1960s, it became a highly contested method, with controversies between scientists, athletes, doctors, sport organizations and coaches. What ideas about altitude and performance were important in this process? What type of scientific hypotheses led scientists and sport practitioners towards increasing high-altitude training? Interestingly, those within sports who rejected the scientific, ‘machine-like’ training methods also often valued the mountains. Famous Swedish coach Gösta Olander is one example. He was the most influential protagonist of the natural training method in Sweden, and his base was in Vålådalen (in Jämtland, near Östersund and Åre). Both Swedish (e.g. Sixten Jernberg, Gunder Hägg) and international athletes (e.g. Michel Jazy and Michel Bernard) came to Vålådalen. The fresh mountain air and scenic surroundings were important as a place for training camps, but scientists later demystified the mountains via scientific explanations about increased oxygen uptake and increasing hemoglobin levels in the blood. Vålådalen became a center not only for natural training, but also for scientific monitoring, testing and evaluation.

And the setting of international standards regarding high-altitude training had a political aspect, as the issue was addressed when white runners from low altitude were threatened by the results of mainly runners from high altitude countries like Kenya and Ethiopia.

Focusing on the Swedish case, we analyze the scientific interest in high-altitude training for sports. Especially, we study the links between science, military and sports.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paris: Editions Glyphe, 2015 Edition: 1
Keyword
High-altitude training, mountains, physiology, skiing, Gösta Olander
National Category
History
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-177828 (URN)978-2-35815-165-8 (ISBN)
Projects
Rational training
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in SportsSwedish Environmental Protection Agency
Note

QC 20160127

Available from: 2015-11-26 Created: 2015-11-26 Last updated: 2016-11-15Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D. & Sörlin, S. (2015). Skidåkare med känsla för det rationella. Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, 24(1), 18-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skidåkare med känsla för det rationella
2015 (Swedish)In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 18-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning, 2015
Keyword
konditionsträning, fysiologi, längdskidåkning, rationalisering, vetenskapshistoria
National Category
History
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-163401 (URN)
Projects
Rationell träning
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Note

QC 20150402

Available from: 2015-04-01 Created: 2015-04-01 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D. (2015). Skiing and Science: Practice, Theory and Co-Production of Training Knowledge in Cross-Country Skiing since the 1950s. In: ECSS Congress Malmö 2015: Sustainable Sport. Paper presented at European College of Sport Science (ECSS) Congress 2015, ‘Sustainable Sport’, Malmö.. Köln
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skiing and Science: Practice, Theory and Co-Production of Training Knowledge in Cross-Country Skiing since the 1950s
2015 (English)In: ECSS Congress Malmö 2015: Sustainable Sport, Köln, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Elite endurance athletes of today use specialized, scientific training methods and the increasing role of science in sports is undeniable. This is especially true for cross-country skiing. But how and when did scientists and educated coaches gain power? Scientification of training methods in cross-country skiing accelerated in the 1950s and cross-country skiing was an early adopter, even if not all skiers were (Svensson 2013). Still, the experiential, local knowledge of skiers remain an important ingredient in modern day training. How have these different knowledge traditions merged? How has it changed training in theory and practice?

 

Methods

This paper analyzes how physiologists and skiers interacted in the transformation of training methods. Material from archives, interviews and previous research will be studied using theories of bio-power (Foucault 1998), sportification (Yttergren 2006, Guttmann 1978) and STS (Knorr-Cetina 1999, Latour 1987) Skiers from Sweden and Norway will be used as the main examples.

 

Results and discussion

Training methods were developed through meetings between practitioners and theoreticians. Scientification of training was driven by hardening international competition. The creation of “rational” training methods was a co-production of knowledge between different knowledge traditions, where skiers represented a traditional, local and tacit knowledge (Polanyi 1958), while scientists represented scientific, written knowledge with universal claims.

In the co-production of knowledge about training, bodies were at the core. Ultimately it was a matter of control over bodies. Should they be subjected to bio-power (Foucault 1998, 2001) or should they remain under the control of the practitioner? The relationship between skier and scientist resembled that of patient and doctor. Interaction between the expert on the local level (skier /patient) and the universal level (physiologist/doctor) resulted in a knowledge-base that affected both practice and theory. Rational training, in the end, was not built only on science but also on the individual and collective experiences of elite skiers.

 

References

Foucault, M.(1998), The Will to Knowledge. The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1. New York: Penguin Books.

Guttmann, A. (1978), From Ritual to Record. The Nature of Modern Sports. New York: Columbia University Press.

Heggie, V. (2011), A History of British Sport Medicine. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

 

Knorr Cetina, K. (1999), Epistemic Cultures: How the Sciences Make Knowledge. London: Harvard University Press.

Latour, B. (1987), ‘Centers of Calculation’, in Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, pp. 215-257.

Polanyi, M. (1958), Personal Knowledge. Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Svensson, D.(2013), ‘How Much Sport is there in Sport Physiology? Practice and Ideas in the Stockholm School of Physiology at GCI, 1941–1969’ in The International Journal of the History of Sport, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 892-913.

Yttergren, L. (1996), Täflan är lifvet: idrottens organisering och sportifiering i Stockholm 1860-1898. Stockholm : Stockholmia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Köln: , 2015
Keyword
Cross-country skiing, training, bio-power, rationalization, technologies of sportification
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-170459 (URN)
Conference
European College of Sport Science (ECSS) Congress 2015, ‘Sustainable Sport’, Malmö.
Projects
Rationell träning
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Note

QC 20150701

The presentation was awarded with ECSS Young Investigators Award (YIA) 2015.

Available from: 2015-06-30 Created: 2015-06-30 Last updated: 2015-07-01Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D., Sörlin, S. & Mulk, I.-M. (2015). Slutrapport för "Fjällens rörelsearv: Diskreta monument i hållbar fjällutveckling". Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Slutrapport för "Fjällens rörelsearv: Diskreta monument i hållbar fjällutveckling"
2015 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet, 2015. p. 13
Keyword
fjäll, stigar, leder, rörelsearv, kulturarv
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-186314 (URN)
Projects
Fjällens rörelsearv: diskreta monument i hållbar fjällutveckling
Note

QC 20160512

Available from: 2016-05-10 Created: 2016-05-10 Last updated: 2016-11-28Bibliographically approved
Svensson, D., Sörlin, S. & Wormbs, N. (2015). The movement heritage: Scale, place, and pathscapes in Anthropocene tourism. In: Martin Gren and Edward Huijbens (Ed.), Tourism and the Anthropocene: (pp. 131-151). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The movement heritage: Scale, place, and pathscapes in Anthropocene tourism
2015 (English)In: Tourism and the Anthropocene / [ed] Martin Gren and Edward Huijbens, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 131-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Anthropogenic change is large-scale. But the Anthropocene is also a result of small-scale, local landscape use and change. These changes and uses are often based in movement. How do movements (sport, outdoor life, tourism etc.) affect landscapes physically and mentally? In the Anthropocene, these questions are increasingly important to answer.

Mobility in the landscape is under-theorized. The cultural history of walking, with Rousseau, Austen, Thoreau, Muir and others have been discussed (e.g. Solnit 2001). Understandings of landscape monuments are often tied to nationalism (Lowenthal 1998, 2008, Hettne et al 2006) and are generally limited to monuments within traditional areas of cultural and natural heritage (buildings, infrastructure, rare species). But the importance of movement as a practice for understanding landscape and ”life worlds” has also been underlined (Ingold 2000, 2011, Hastrup 2009). The movement heritage, in terms of skiing tracks, hiking trails etc. has to no small degree shaped understanding of the landscape. We investigate how these landscapes of mobility have been and can be articulated, and how they can contribute to a sustainable tourism in the Anthropocene.

We seek to combine this growing understanding of cultural heritage aspects of landscape with theories from the modern landscapes of bodily movement. These landscapes have been labeled portable (Qviström 2013), but in contrast to this portability, the landscapes of movement we focus on are not portable. Instead, their protection is based on their cultural history and emotional value. Is it possible to combine economic and ecological interests in tourism in the Anthropocene? 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2015
Series
Contemporary Geographies of Leisure, Tourism and Mobility
Keyword
Tourism, Arctic, movement heritage, mobility, sustainabilty, Anthropocene, place ethic
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180847 (URN)000372820800008 ()2-s2.0-84960504366 (Scopus ID)9781138814578 (ISBN)
Projects
Mistra Arctic Sustainable DevelopmentFjällens rörelsearv: Diskreta monument i hållbar fjällutveckling
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection AgencyMistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20160316

Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-03-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2914-4476

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