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Hesaraki, A. & Holmberg, S. (2015). Demand-controlled ventilation in new residential buildings: consequences on indoor air quality and energy savings. Indoor + Built Environment, 24(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Demand-controlled ventilation in new residential buildings: consequences on indoor air quality and energy savings
2015 (English)In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 24, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The consequences on indoor air quality (IAQ) and potential of energy savings when using a variable airvolume (VAV) ventilation system were studied in a newly built Swedish building. Computer simulationswith IDA Indoor Climate and Energy 4 (ICE) and analytical models were used to study the IAQ andenergy savings when switching the ventilation flow from 0.375 ls1m2 to 0.100 ls1m2 duringunoccupancy. To investigate whether decreasing the ventilation rate to 0.1 ls1m2 during unoccupancy,based on Swedish building regulations, BBR, is acceptable and how long the reduction can lastfor an acceptable IAQ, four strategies with different VAV durations were proposed. This study revealedthat decreasing the flow rate to 0.1 ls1m2 for more than 4 h in an unoccupied newly built buildingcreates unacceptable IAQ in terms of volatile organic compounds concentration. Hence, if the durationof unoccupancy in the building is more than 4 h, it is recommended to increase the ventilation rate from0.100 ls1m2 to 0.375 ls1m2 before the home is occupied. The study showed that when the investigatedbuilding was vacant for 10 h during weekdays, increasing the ventilation rate 2 h before occupantsarrive home (low ventilation rate for 8 h) creates acceptable IAQ conditions. In this system, theheating requirements for ventilation air and electricity consumption for the ventilation fan weredecreased by 20% and 30%, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
Controlled ventilation system, Energy performance, IDA ICE 4, Indoor air quality, Variable air volume
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-123568 (URN)10.1177/1420326X13508565 (DOI)000351700600003 ()2-s2.0-84925293881 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20150429

Available from: 2013-06-12 Created: 2013-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A., Bourdakis, E., Ploskic, A. & Holmberg, S. (2015). Experimental study of energy performance in low-temperature hydronic heating systems. Energy and Buildings, 109, 108-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental study of energy performance in low-temperature hydronic heating systems
2015 (English)In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 109, p. 108-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy consumption, thermal environment and environmental impacts were analytically and experimentally studied for different types of heat emitters. The heat emitters studied were conventional radiator, ventilation radiator, and floor heating with medium-, low-, and very-low-temperature supply, respectively. The ventilation system in the lab room was a mechanical exhaust ventilation system that provided one air change per hour of fresh air through the opening in the external wall with a constant temperature of 5 °C, which is the mean winter temperature in Copenhagen. The parameters studied in the climate chamber were supply and return water temperature from the heat emitters, indoor temperature, and heat emitter surface temperature. Experiments showed that the mean supply water temperature for floor heating was the lowest, i.e. 30 °C, but it was close to the ventilation radiator, i.e. 33 °C. The supply water temperature in all measurements for conventional radiator was significantly higher than ventilation radiator and floor heating; namely, 45 °C. Experimental results indicated that the mean indoor temperature was close to the acceptable level of 22 °C in all cases. For energy calculations, it was assumed that all heat emitters were connected to a ground-source heat pump. Analytical calculations showed that using ventilation radiator and floor heating instead of conventional radiator resulted in a saving of 17% and 22% in heat pump's electricity consumption, respectively. This would reduce the CO2 emission from the building's heating system by 21 % for the floor heating and by 18% for the ventilation radiator compared to the conventional radiator.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Low-temperature hydronic heating systems; Energy performance; Thermal environment; Experimental study; Ventilation radiator; Floor heating
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-172002 (URN)10.1016/j.enbuild.2015.09.064 (DOI)000367115300010 ()2-s2.0-84944749414 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20160128

Available from: 2015-08-11 Created: 2015-08-11 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A., Myhren, J. A. & Holmberg, S. (2015). Influence of different ventilation levels on indoor air quality and energy savings: A case study of a single-family house. Sustainable cities and society, 19, 165-172
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of different ventilation levels on indoor air quality and energy savings: A case study of a single-family house
2015 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 19, p. 165-172Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The influence of different ventilation levels on indoor air quality (IAQ) and energy savings were studied experimentally and analytically in a single-family house occupied by two adults and one infant, situated in Borlange, Sweden. The building studied had an exhaust ventilation system with a range of air flow rate settings. In order to find appropriate ventilation rates regarding CO2, relative humidity (RH) and temperature as indicators of IAQ, four ventilation levels were considered, as follows: (I) A very low ventilation rate of 0.10 L s(-1) m(-2); (II) A low ventilation rate of 0.20 L s(-1) m(-2); (III) A normal ventilation rate of 0.35 L s(-1) m(-2); (IV) A high ventilation rate of 0.70 L s(-1) m(-2). In all cases, the sensor was positioned in the exhaust duct exiting from habitable spaces. Measurements showed that, for case I, the CO2 concentration reached over 1300 ppm, which was higher than the commonly referenced threshold for ventilation control, i.e. 1000 ppm, showing unacceptable IAQQ. In case II, the CO2 level was always below 950 ppm, indicating that 0.20 L s(-1) m(-2) is a sufficient ventilation rate for the reference building. The case III showed that the ventilation rate of 0.35 L s(-1) m(-2) caused a maximum CO2 level of 725 ppm; showing the level recommended by Swedish regulations was high with respect to CO2 level. In addition, measurements showed that the RH and temperature were within acceptable ranges in all cases. An energy savings calculation showed that, in case II, the comparative savings of the combined energy requirement for ventilation fan and ventilation heating were 43% compared with case.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Indoor air quality, Site measurements, Ventilation level, Energy savings
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180997 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2015.08.004 (DOI)000367398900017 ()2-s2.0-84944054031 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160127

Available from: 2016-01-27 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A., Ploskic, A. & Holmberg, S. (2015). Integrating Low-temperature Heating Systems into Energy Efficient Buildings. Paper presented at The 6th International Building Physics Conference, IBPC 2015, Turin, Italy, 14-17 June 2015. Energy Procedia, 78, 3043-3048
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating Low-temperature Heating Systems into Energy Efficient Buildings
2015 (English)In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 78, p. 3043-3048Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy requirements for space heating and domestic hot water supplies in the Swedish building sector are responsible for almost 60 % of the total energy used. To decrease this enormous figure, energy saving measures are required, as well as opportunities to use low-temperature heating systems for increase sustainability. The present paper studies low-temperature heating systems, including heat production units (district heating or heat pumps) and heat emitting units in the room. The aim was to find an answer to the question of whether or not low-temperature heating systems are energy efficient and sustainable compared with conventional heating systems. To answer this question, we considered different efficiency aspects related to energy and exergy. The analysis showed that low-temperature heating systems are more energy efficient and environmentally friendly than conventional heating systems. This was attributed to heat pumps and district heating systems with lower temperature heat emitters using a greater share of renewable resources and less auxiliary fuels. This report discusses the pros and cons of different types of low-temperature heat emitters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Low-temperature heating systems, Energy efficiency, Low-temperature district heating, Heat pumps
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-169723 (URN)10.1016/j.egypro.2015.11.720 (DOI)000370934403019 ()2-s2.0-84962507817 (Scopus ID)
Conference
The 6th International Building Physics Conference, IBPC 2015, Turin, Italy, 14-17 June 2015
Note

QC 20150812. QC 20160411

Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A., Halilovic, A. & Holmberg, S. (2015). Low-temperature Heat Emission Combined with Seasonal Thermal Storage and Heat Pump. Solar Energy, 119, 122-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-temperature Heat Emission Combined with Seasonal Thermal Storage and Heat Pump
2015 (English)In: Solar Energy, ISSN 0038-092X, E-ISSN 1471-1257, Vol. 119, p. 122-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied the application of a stratified seasonal hot water storage tank with a heat pump connected to medium-, low- and very-low-temperature space heat emissions for a single-family house in Stockholm, Sweden. Our aim was to investigate the influence of heat emission design temperature on the efficiency and design parameters of seasonal storage in terms of collector area, the ratio of storage volume to collector area (RVA), and the ratio of height to diameter of storage tank. For this purpose, we developed a mathematical model in MATLAB to predict hourly heat demand in the building, heat loss from the storage tank, solar collector heat production, and heat support by heat pump as a backup system when needed. In total, 108 cases were simulated with RVAs that ranged from 2 to 5 (m3 m−2), collector areas of 30, 40, and 50 (m2), height-to-diameter-of-storage-tank ratios of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 (m m1), and various heat emissions with design supply/return temperatures of 35/30 as very-low-, 45/35 as low-, and 55/45 (°C) as medium-temperature heat emission. In order to find the best combination based on heat emission, we considered the efficiency of the system in terms of the heat pump work considering coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump and solar fraction. Our results showed that, for all types of heat emission a storage-volume-to-collector area ratio of 5 m3 m2, with a collector area of 50 m2, and a height-to-diameter ratio of 1.0 m m1 were needed in order to provide the maximum efficiency. Results indicated that for very-low-temperature heat emission the heat pump work was less than half of that of the medium-temperature heat emission. This was due to 7% higher solar fraction and 14% higher COP of heat pump connected to very-low-temperature heat emission compared to medium-temperature heat emission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Seasonal thermal energy storage, Stratified storage tank, Heat pump, Low-temperature heat emission
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-170067 (URN)10.1016/j.solener.2015.06.046 (DOI)000361583300010 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20150723

Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A. (2015). Low-Temperature Heating and Ventilation for Sustainability in Energy Efficient Buildings. (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-Temperature Heating and Ventilation for Sustainability in Energy Efficient Buildings
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In 2013, the building sector consumed approximately 39 % of the total final energy use in Sweden. Energy used for heating and hot water was responsible for approximately 60 % of the total energy consumption in the building sector. Therefore, energy-efficient and renewable-based heating and ventilation systems have high potential for energy savings. The potentials studied in this thesis include the combination of a low-temperature heat emitter (supply temperature below 45 °C) with heat pump and/or seasonal thermal energy storage, and variable air volume ventilation system. The main aim of this thesis was to evaluate energy savings and indoor air quality when those energy-efficient and sustainable heating and ventilation systems were implemented in buildings. For this purpose, on-site measurements, lab tests, analytical models, and building energy simulation tool IDA Indoor Climate and Energy 4 were used.

Annual on-site measurements for five new two-family houses with low- and very-low-temperature heat emitters connected to an exhaust air heat pump showed  that  between  45–51 kWh∙m-2 energy was used  to  produce  and transport supply water for space heating and domestic hot water. Statistical data showed that these values are 39–46 % lower compared to the energy requirement for the same usage  which is, 84 kWh∙m-2)  in  an  average Swedish new single- and two-family house.

Annual on-site measurements for five new two-family houses with low- and very-low-temperature heat emitters connected to an exhaust air heat pump showed that between 45–51 kWh∙m-2 energy was used to produce and transport supply water for space heating and domestic hot water. Statistical data showed that these values are 39–46 % lower compared to the energy requirement for the same usage (which is, 84 kWh∙m-2) in an average Swedish new single- and two-family house.

In order to compare the energy performance of very-low- and low-temperature heat emitters with medium-temperature heat emitters under the same condition, lab tests were conducted in a climate chamber facility at Technical University of Denmark (DTU). To cover the heat demand of 20 W·m-2 by active heating, measurements showed that the required supply water temperatures were 45 ºC for the conventional radiator, 33 ºC in ventilation radiator and 30 ºC in floor heating. This 12–15 ºC temperature reduction with ventilation radiator and floor heating resulted in 17–22 % savings in energy consumption compared to a reference case with conventional radiator.

Reducing the supply temperature to the building’s heating system allows using more renewable and low-quality heat sources. In this thesis, the application of seasonal thermal energy storage in combination with heat pump in a building with very-low-, low-, and medium-temperature heat emitters was investigated. Analytical model showed that using a 250 m3 hot water seasonal storage tank connected to a 50 m2 solar collector and a heat pump resulted in 85–92 % of the total heat demand being covered by solar energy.

In addition to the heating system, this thesis also looked at ventilation system in terms of implementing variable (low) air volume ventilation instead of a constant (high) flow in new and retrofitted old buildings. The analytical model showed that, for new buildings with high volatile organic compound concentration during initial years of construction, decreasing the ventilation rate to 0.1 L·s-1·m-2 during the entire un-occupancy period (from 8:00–18:00) creates unacceptable indoor air quality when home is occupied at  18:00.  So,  in  order  to  create  acceptable  indoor  air  quality  when  the occupants come home, a return to the normal ventilation requirements was suggested to take place two hours before the home was occupied. This eight- hour ventilation reduction produced savings of 20 % for ventilation heating and 30 % for electricity consumption by ventilation fan.

In addition, the influence of different ventilation levels on indoor air quality and energy savings was studied experimentally and analytically in a single- family house occupied by two adults and one infant. Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration as an indicator of indoor air quality was considered in order to find  appropriate  ventilation  rates.  Measurements  showed  that,  with  an 0.20 L∙s-1∙m-2  ventilation rate, the CO2   level  was always below 950 ppm, which shows that this level is sufficient for the reference building (CO2 lower than 1000 ppm is acceptable). Calculations showed that low ventilation rates of 0.20 L∙s1∙m-2 caused 43 % savings of the combined energy consumption for  ventilation  fan  and  ventilation  heating  compared  to  the  cases  with 0.35 L∙s-1∙m-2  as a normal ventilation rate recommended by BBR (Swedish Building Regulations).

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015. p. x, 40
Keywords
Low-temperature heating system, Energy savings, Seasonal thermal energy storage, Variable air volume ventilation system, Indoor air quality
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-170065 (URN)978-91-7595-650-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-09-04, M3, Brinellvägen 64, KTH, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20150626

Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-26 Last updated: 2015-08-11Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A., Holmberg, S. & Haghighat, F. (2015). Seasonal thermal energy storage with heat pumps and low temperatures in building projects-A comparative review. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 43, 1199-1213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seasonal thermal energy storage with heat pumps and low temperatures in building projects-A comparative review
2015 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 43, p. 1199-1213Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Application of seasonal thermal energy storage with heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings has received much consideration in recent decades, as it can help to cover gaps between energy availability and demand, e.g. from summer to winter. This has the potential to reduce the large proportion of energy consumed by buildings, especially in colder climate countries. The problem with seasonal storage, however, is heat loss. This can be reduced by low-temperature storage but a heat pump is then recommended to adjust temperatures as needed by buildings in use. The aim of this paper was to compare different seasonal thermal energy storage methods using a heat pump in terms of coefficient of performance (COP) of heat pump and solar fraction, and further, to investigate the relationship between those factors and the size of the system, i.e. collector area and storage volume based on past building projects including residences, offices and schools.

Keywords
Seasonal thermal energy storage, Heat pump, Solar fraction, Coefficient of performance of heat pump
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-161099 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2014.12.002 (DOI)000348880600094 ()2-s2.0-84919820148 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150623

Available from: 2015-03-24 Created: 2015-03-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A., Holmberg, S. & Haghighat, F. (2014). Energy-Efficient and Sustainable Heating System for Buildings: Combining seasonal heat storage with heat pumps and low-temperature heating systems. In: : . Paper presented at The 10th International Energy Conference, IEC 2014,Tehran, Iran, August 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy-Efficient and Sustainable Heating System for Buildings: Combining seasonal heat storage with heat pumps and low-temperature heating systems
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

During gaps between high heating demand in winter and high heating production in summer, the application of seasonal thermal energy storage becomes important. However, heat loss from seasonal thermal energy storage has always been an issue. Therefore, in order to decrease heat loss and increase solar collector efficiency, low-temperature heat storage is recommended. Nevertheless, this temperature is not sufficient throughout the heating season, which means that a heat pump is recommended in order to use this low-grade source to produce a suitable temperature for the heating system. In addition, heat pumps have better efficiency when working with low-temperature heating systems. This study investigated the seasonal thermal storage in combination with heat pump and low-temperature heating systems, with the aim of finding a suitable size for thermal energy storage and collector area. The study showed that 300 m3 of storage volume and 55 m2 of collector area could cover 80 % of the total energy demand using solar energy.

Keywords
Seasonal thermal energy storage, Heat pump, Low temperature heating system
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-169720 (URN)
Conference
The 10th International Energy Conference, IEC 2014,Tehran, Iran, August 2014
Note

QC 20150623

Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-23 Last updated: 2015-07-21Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A., Myhren, J. A. & Holmberg, S. (2014). Multi-zone Demand-controlled Ventilation in Residential Buildings: An experimental case study. In: : . Paper presented at 35th AIVC Conference, 4th TightVent Conference and 2nd Venticool Conference, Poznań, Poland, 24-25 September 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-zone Demand-controlled Ventilation in Residential Buildings: An experimental case study
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Numerous studies have investigated the application of multi-zone demand-controlled ventilation for office buildings. However, although Swedish regulations allow ventilation rates in residential buildings to be decreased by 70 % during non-occupancy, this system is not very common in the sector. The main focus of the present study was to experimentally investigate the indoor air quality and energy consumption when using multi-zone demand-controlled ventilation in a residential building. The building studied was located in Borlänge, Sweden. This building was recently renovated with better windows with low U values, together with internally-added insulation materials. The building had natural ventilation, which decreased significantly after retrofitting and resulted in poor indoor air quality. Therefore, a controllable mechanical ventilation system was installed. The ventilation rate was controlled according to the demand in each zone of the building by CO2 concentration as an indicator of indoor air quality in habitable spaces and relative humidity and VOC level in the toilet and bathroom. The study showed that multi-zone demand-controlled ventilation significantly reduced the CO2 concentration leading to improvement in indoor air quality. However, building with demand-controlled ventilation consumed more energy than natural ventilation as it increases the ventilation loss by forcing more air into the building. Nevertheless, in the demand-controlled ventilation system, the energy consumption for the ventilation fan and ventilation loss was almost half of the constant high rate ventilation flow.

National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-169732 (URN)
Conference
35th AIVC Conference, 4th TightVent Conference and 2nd Venticool Conference, Poznań, Poland, 24-25 September 2014
Note

QC 20150623

Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-23 Last updated: 2015-07-21Bibliographically approved
Hesaraki, A. & Holmberg, S. (2013). An investigation of energy efficient and sustainable heating systems for buildings: Combining photovoltaics with heat pump. In: Sustainability in Energy and Buildings: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference in Sustainability in Energy and Buildings (SEB´12). Paper presented at Sustainability in Energy and Buildings, SEB'12 Stockholm, Sweden 3 - 5 September 2012 (pp. 189-197). Springer Berlin/Heidelberg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An investigation of energy efficient and sustainable heating systems for buildings: Combining photovoltaics with heat pump
2013 (English)In: Sustainability in Energy and Buildings: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference in Sustainability in Energy and Buildings (SEB´12), Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 189-197Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Renewable energy sources contribute considerable amounts of energy when natural phenomena are converted into useful forms of energy. Solar energy, i.e. renewable energy, is converted to electricity by photovoltaic systems (PV). This study was aimed at investigating the possibility of combining PV with Heat Pump (HP) (PV-HP system). HP uses direct electricity to produce heat. In order to increase the sustainability and efficiency of the system, the required electricity for the HP was supposed to be produced by solar energy via PV. For this purpose a newly-built semi-detached building equipped with exhaust air heat pump and low temperature-heating system was chosen in Stockholm, Sweden. The heat pump provides heat for Domestic Hot Water (DHW) consumption and space heating. Since selling the overproduction of PV to the grid is not yet an option in Sweden, the PV should be designed to avoid overproduction. During the summer, the HP uses electricity only to supply DHW. Hence, the PV should be designed to balance the production and consumption during the summer months. In this study two simulation programs were used: IDA Indoor Climate and Energy (ICE) as a building energy simulation tool to calculate the energy consumption of the building, and the simulation program WINSUN to estimate the output of the PV. Simulation showed that a 7.3 m2 PV area with 15 % efficiency produces nearly the whole electricity demand of the HP for DHW during summer time. As a result, the contribution of free solar energy in producing heat through 7.3 m2 fixed PV with 23o tilt is 17 % of the annual heat pump consumption. This energy supports 51 % of the total DHW demand.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013
Series
Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies, ISSN 2190-3018 ; 22
Keywords
Domestic hot water, PV-HP system, Solar power, Sustainable development
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-123571 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-36645-1_18 (DOI)2-s2.0-84879457927 (Scopus ID)978-364236644-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Sustainability in Energy and Buildings, SEB'12 Stockholm, Sweden 3 - 5 September 2012
Note

QC 20130612

Available from: 2013-06-12 Created: 2013-06-12 Last updated: 2015-07-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8614-5806

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