Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Joyce, P. J., Finnveden, G., Håkansson, C. & Wood, R. (2019). A multi-impact analysis of changing ICT consumption patterns for Sweden and the EU: Indirect rebound effects and evidence of decoupling. Journal of Cleaner Production, 211, 1154-1161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multi-impact analysis of changing ICT consumption patterns for Sweden and the EU: Indirect rebound effects and evidence of decoupling
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 211, p. 1154-1161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is one of the major areas of growth in consumption seen over the last two decades. The falling prices of ICT and increasing energy efficiency of ICT may lead to reduced spending on ICT and electricity in the future. However, lower spending in one area can trigger higher spending elsewhere, leading to 'rebound effects' which can reduce or even cancel out the environmental benefits associated with lower consumption of a given product or service, and reducing the efficacy of environmental policy. In this study we use Multi-Regional Input Output analysis to investigate trends in the consumption of, and environmental and social impacts associated with la products in Sweden and the EU. We find that ICT spending is linked to prosperity, with a clear fall as a result of the 2008 financial crisis, but a recovery since. There is some evidence that the environmental impact associated with ICE has begun to decouple from consumption in Sweden, but not at an EU level. Environmental rebound effects associated with reduced ICT consumption are strong close to, and in most cases far above 100% (so called backfire effects). This backfire effect is strongest for energy use and total material footprint, which are both close to 200% in Sweden. This means that an increased spending on ICE products and services while keeping the overall consumption level constant, would decrease environmental impacts. Environmental rebound effects are much lower for reduced energy spending (as low as 2 percent), particularly at an EU level. Rebound effects in social indicators are assessed for the first time for 10' products. We find that value added in the EU is relatively insensitive to changes in spending patterns related to ICT and energy (rebound effects similar to 100%), however rebound effects in employment are seen, particularly resulting from decreased energy spending. At an EU level, reallocation of spending resulting from lower energy consumption results in a net increase in employment, while in Sweden the reverse is true. We conclude that policies focused on reducing energy spending are likely to have a greater overall environmental effect than measures which result in reduced consumer spending on ICT. However, in light of the conflicting social rebound effects at an EU and Swedish level, the importance of understanding the broader consequences of policy decision across a broad range of measures in advance of their implementation is once again highlighted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
Keywords
ICT, Rebound effects, GHG emissions, Material footprint, Energy use, MRIO
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-245133 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.11.207 (DOI)000457952400098 ()
Note

QC 20190313

Available from: 2019-03-13 Created: 2019-03-13 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Peters, G., Harder, R., Arvidsson, R., Baumann, H., Björklund, A., Despeisse, M., . . . Wallbaum, H. (2019). A Swedish comment on ‘review: the availability of life-cycle studies in Sweden’. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Swedish comment on ‘review: the availability of life-cycle studies in Sweden’
Show others...
2019 (English)In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag, 2019
Keywords
Academic publication, Bibliographic studies, Google, GRI, Peer-review, Scopus
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252243 (URN)10.1007/s11367-019-01610-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063188357 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC20190614

Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Fauré, E., Dawkins, E., Wood, R., Finnveden, G., Palm, V., Persson, L. & Schmidt, S. (2019). Environmental pressure from Swedish consumption - The largest contributing producer countries, products and services. Journal of Cleaner Production, 231, 698-713
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental pressure from Swedish consumption - The largest contributing producer countries, products and services
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 231, p. 698-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to produce goods and services that are consumed in Sweden, natural resources are extracted and pollutants are emitted in many other countries. This paper presents an analysis of the goods and services consumed in Sweden that cause the largest environmental pressures in terms of resource use and emissions, identifying in which countries or regions these pressures occur. The results have been calculated using a hybrid model developed in the PRINCE project combining the multi-regional input-output database EXIOBASE with data from the Swedish economic and environmental accounts. The following environmental pressures are analysed: Use of Land, Water and Material resources, Emissions of Greenhouse gases (GHG), Sulphur dioxides (SO2), Nitrogen oxides (NOx), and Particulate Matters (PM 2.5 and 10). The product groups are those goods and services bought for private or public consumption and capital investments, as listed in the Swedish economic accounts. The results show that Sweden is a net importer of all embodied environmental pressures, except for land use and material use. The most important product groups across environmental pressures are construction, food products and direct emissions from households (except for sulphur dioxide emissions and material use for the latter). Other product groups that are found to have environmental pressures across several indicators are wholesale and retail services, architecture and engineering, dwellings, motor vehicles and machinery and equipment. However, for the three natural resource pressures Use of Water, Land and Material resources, agricultural products are a relatively important product group along with products from forestry for the last two indicators. A considerable proportion of the environmental pressure occurs in Sweden, but when comparing those of domestic origin and that occurring internationally, the majority of all pressures for Swedish consumption occur abroad (except for land use). Other countries stand out as particularly important as origins of pressure for Swedish consumption, most notably China, which is among the top five countries for emissions to air, as well as blue water and material use. Other highly relevant countries or regions are Rest of Asia and Pacific (i.e. Asia and Pacific except Indonesia, Taiwan, Australia, India, South Korea, China and Japan), Russia, Germany as well as Denmark and Spain for certain product groups and environmental pressure combinations. This pattern of geographically spread pressures caused by Swedish consumption indicates the need for addressing the pressures at various levels of collaboration: national, within the European Union, bilateral and international.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255353 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.05.148 (DOI)000474680100059 ()2-s2.0-85066270262 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190730

Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Palm, V., Wood, R., Berglund, M., Dawkins, E., Finnveden, G., Schmidt, S. & Steinbach, N. (2019). Environmental pressures from Swedish consumption – A hybrid multi-regional input-output approach. Journal of Cleaner Production, 228, 634-644
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental pressures from Swedish consumption – A hybrid multi-regional input-output approach
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 228, p. 634-644Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden has a policy goal of solving major environmental problems in Sweden within a generation, without increasing environmental or health problems in other countries. Following up this goal requires indicators for domestic and external footprints of Swedish consumption. This paper presents such macro-level indicators for the years 2008–2014.

The new indicators are consistent with Swedish statistics from the System of Environmental-Economic Accounts. They combine a multi-regional input-output (MRIO) database, to capture the external components of Sweden's consumption, with national input-output, trade and environmental statistics. The hybrid MRIO-Sweden model provides a comprehensive environmental account for follow-up of the Generational Goal.

This paper presents impacts from household consumption, government consumption and capital formation, covering emissions of greenhouse gases, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), land use, materials consumption, and blue water consumption.

Except for land use, the majority (60% or more) of the environmental pressures due to consumption occurred outside Sweden in 2014; more than 90% of sulphur emissions and more than 80% of the water use fell abroad. The environmental pressures from consumption decreased over this period for all indicators (except materials consumption). This suggests an absolute decoupling between environmental pressure due to consumption and economic growth, which rose over the period. It is, however, too early to determine whether this is a genuine trend or a temporary stabilisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Consumption, Environment, Generational goal, Trade, Multi-regional input-output, Decoupling
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-263837 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.04.181 (DOI)
Note

QC 20191122

Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-11-22Bibliographically approved
Fauré, E., Finnveden, G. & Gunnarsson-Östling, U. (2019). Four low-carbon futures for a Swedish society beyond GDP growth. Journal of Cleaner Production, 236, Article ID UNSP 117595.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Four low-carbon futures for a Swedish society beyond GDP growth
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 236, article id UNSP 117595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes how different backcasting scenarios for developments beyond traditional GDP growth 2050, in Sweden may fulfil a climate goal corresponding to keeping global warming to a maximum 1.5 degrees C with 50% likelihood. This corresponds to a 92% decrease of greenhouse gas emissions from Swedish consumption from today's level. The four scenarios illustrate different strategies: 1) collaborative economy, 2) local self-sufficiency, 3) automation for quality of life and 4) circular economy in the welfare state. The aim is to further hone and quantify the scenario narratives with a focus on greenhouse gas emissions occurring as a result of Swedish consumption, both private and public. The results show that the climate target can be met in all scenarios but this requires radical sector-specific as well as general changes, including decarbonisation, technology development, increased efficiencies, innovative practices and reduced demand. The mix of these strategies varies for different sectors and different scenarios, but all are needed to reach the climate goals. As we assume that Sweden is fossil-free 2050, particular areas of attention are diets, travel, emission intensities in other countries and the level of imports. Potential implications for other environmental goals, land use and biodiversity as well as the potential magnitude of negative emissions technologies, although uncertain and limited, that could offset some additional greenhouse gas emissions are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260155 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.07.070 (DOI)000483414000105 ()2-s2.0-85069702281 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191001

Available from: 2019-10-01 Created: 2019-10-01 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
Persson, L., Arvidsson, R., Berglund, M., Cederberg, C., Finnveden, G., Palm, V., . . . Wood, R. (2019). Indicators for national consumption-based accounting of chemicals. Journal of Cleaner Production, 215, 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indicators for national consumption-based accounting of chemicals
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 215, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increased chemical use is causing a growing number of environmental problems and chemical products are pervasive in societies within animal and crop-based agriculture, in industrial processes and in households. National environmental targets, as well as the global chemical-related goals in the 2030 Agenda, call for the monitoring of chemical use and emissions. The growing international trade of goods, where use and regulation of chemical inputs vary highly between countries, complicates measurements. This paper addresses these issues by deriving a set of indicators on chemical use and emissions and connect the global impacts to a country's total consumption, here using the case of Sweden. The indicators are based on a hybrid model combining the multi-regional input-output analysis database EXIOBASE with data from the Swedish System of Economic and Environmental Accounts together with a novel set of environmental extensions. A review of databases is conducted and discussed in relation to the driver-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) framework for indicators. Five indicators are calculated, showing the chemical use and emissions connected to consumption, both within a country and abroad. The indicators are: use of hazardous chemical products, use of pesticides, use of antimicrobial veterinary medicines, emissions of hazardous substances, and of the potential toxicity of these emissions. The results show that the impact of Swedish consumption in terms of use and emissions of hazardous substances is largely taking place outside the Swedish borders. Only 10-24% of the pressure from Swedish consumption is shown to occur within Sweden's borders, depending on the indicator. The use of hazardous chemical products and veterinary medicines related to Swedish consumption primarily takes place in other EU countries, whereas the use of pesticides as well as reported emissions of pollutants occur mainly in countries outside the EU. The results highlight the need for improved international accounting of chemical flows, as well as for strengthened policy frameworks to address cross-border impacts of consumption of hazardous chemical products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-245886 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.12.294 (DOI)000459358300001 ()2-s2.0-85060347186 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190311

Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved
Kabisch, S., Finnveden, G., Kratochvil, P., Sendi, R., Smagacz-Poziemska, M., Matos, R. & Bylund, J. (2019). New Urban Transitions towards Sustainability: Addressing SDG Challenges (Research and Implementation Tasks and Topics from the Perspective of the Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI) Urban Europe). Sustainability, 11(8), Article ID 2242.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Urban Transitions towards Sustainability: Addressing SDG Challenges (Research and Implementation Tasks and Topics from the Perspective of the Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI) Urban Europe)
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 2242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper presents the requirements and challenges of urban transitions towards sustainability from the perspective of the SAB of the JPI Urban Europe. Critical reflections on the achievements and identification of gaps in the activities of JPI Urban Europe, based on the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda SRIA (2015-2020), reveal advanced research questions, tasks, and approaches that influenced the development process of the SRIA 2.0 (released in February 2019). The authors emphasize the dilemma approach, the local context and the co-creation concept to pursue urban transitions in real-world context. Considering this frame, they propose specific domains for further research on urban transitions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
urban transitions, SDGs, dilemma approach, co-creation, local context, SRIA, research priorities
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252642 (URN)10.3390/su11082242 (DOI)000467752200055 ()
Note

QC 20190610

Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Svenfelt, Å., Alfredsson, E., Bradley, K., Fauré, E., Finnveden, G., Fuehrer, P., . . . Ohlund, E. (2019). Scenarios for sustainable futures beyond GDP growth 2050. Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, 111, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scenarios for sustainable futures beyond GDP growth 2050
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 111, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The idea of continued economic growth is increasingly questioned and critically analysed on the basis of its potential negative sustainability impact. Along with the critique, visions and strategies for alternative systems need also be brought onto the agenda. The aim of this paper is to present the qualitative content of scenarios that explore sustainability strategies for the Swedish society when economic growth is not seen as an end in itself, and instead the objective is other values/targets that society might wish to achieve. Multi-target backcasting scenarios are developed that illustrate future states in which four sustainability targets (climate, land use, participation, and resource security) are to be attained. The focus of these four scenarios is: 1) a Collaborative economy, 2) Local self-sufficiency, 3) Automation for quality of life, and 4) Circular economy in the welfare state. In the paper, we also present the process of the development of the scenarios, and feedback from stakeholders. Although the focus is on Sweden, the process and scenarios may also be relevant for other similar countries. The scenarios are discussed in terms of their relevance and their purpose, the fulfilment of the sustainability targets, and the multi-target approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
Keywords
Multi-target, Sustainability targets, Backcasting, Scenarios, Beyond growth
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-257561 (URN)10.1016/j.futures.2019.05.001 (DOI)000478703800001 ()2-s2.0-85066049333 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190925

Available from: 2019-09-25 Created: 2019-09-25 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
Finnveden, G., Newman, J. & Verhoef, L. A. (2019). Sustainable Development and Higher Education: Acting with a Purpose. Sustainability, 11(14), Article ID 3831.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Development and Higher Education: Acting with a Purpose
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 14, article id 3831Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Higher Education Institutions, Education for Sustainable Development, Campus, Sustainable Development Goals, Research
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260205 (URN)10.3390/su11143831 (DOI)000482261800076 ()2-s2.0-85068940534 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190930

Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Larsdotter, K. & Finnveden, G. (2018). Creating change with seed funding.. In: : . Paper presented at Annual International Sustainable Campus Network Conference, Stockholm..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creating change with seed funding.
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-250590 (URN)
Conference
Annual International Sustainable Campus Network Conference, Stockholm.
Note

QCR 20190624

Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5600-0726

Search in DiVA

Show all publications