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Publications (10 of 37) Show all publications
Aronsson, S., Artman, H., Lindquist, S., Mikael, M., Persson, T., Ramberg, R., . . . van de Vehn, P. (2019). Supporting after action review in simulator mission training: Co-creating visualization concepts for training of fast-jet fighter pilots. The Journal of Defence Modeling and Simulation: Applications, Methodology, Technology, 16(3), 219-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting after action review in simulator mission training: Co-creating visualization concepts for training of fast-jet fighter pilots
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2019 (English)In: The Journal of Defence Modeling and Simulation: Applications, Methodology, Technology, ISSN 1548-5129, E-ISSN 1557-380X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 219-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents the design and evaluation of visualization concepts supporting After Action Review (AAR) in simulator mission training of fast-jet fighter pilots. The visualization concepts were designed based on three key characteristics of representations: re-representation, graphical constraining, and computational offloading. The visualization concepts represent combined parameters of missile launch and threat range, the former meant to elicit discussions about the prerequisites for launching missiles, and the latter to present details of what threats a certain aircraft is facing at a specific moment. The visualization concepts were designed to: 1) perceptually and cognitively offload mental workload from participants in support of determining relevant situations to discuss; 2) re-represent parameters in a format that facilitates reading-off of crucial information; and 3) graphically constrain plausible interpretations. Through a series of workshop iterations, two visualization concepts were developed and evaluated with 11 pilots and instructors. All pilots were unanimous in their opinion that the visualization concepts should be implemented as part of the AAR. Offloading, in terms of finding interesting events in the dynamic and unique training sessions, was the most important guiding concept, while re-representation and graphical constraining enabled a more structured and grounded collaboration during the AAR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
After-action-review (AAR), design-based research, external cognition, simulator-based training, performance evaluation, visualizations
National Category
Pedagogy Other Engineering and Technologies
Research subject
Aerospace Engineering; Technology and Learning; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-241169 (URN)10.1177/1548512918823296 (DOI)000470768900001 ()2-s2.0-85060569105 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190118

Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
Romero, M. (2018). My users taught me to read with my ears. interactions, 25(3), 6-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>My users taught me to read with my ears
2018 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 6-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Interactions website (interactions.acm.org) hosts a stable of bloggers who share insights and observations on HCI, often challenging current practices. Each issue we'll publish selected posts from some of the leading and emerging voices in the field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228914 (URN)10.1145/3203184 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046862305 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180530

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
de Giorgio, A., Romero, M., Onori, M. & Wang, L. (2017). Human-machine Collaboration in Virtual Reality for Adaptive Production Engineering. Procedia Manufacturing, 11, 1279-1287
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human-machine Collaboration in Virtual Reality for Adaptive Production Engineering
2017 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 11, p. 1279-1287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper outlines the main steps towards an open and adaptive simulation method for human-robot collaboration (HRC) in production engineering supported by virtual reality (VR). The work is based on the latest software developments in the gaming industry, in addition to the already commercially available hardware that is robust and reliable. This allows to overcome VR limitations of the industrial software provided by manufacturing machine producers and it is based on an open-source community programming approach and also leads to significant advantages such as interfacing with the latest developed hardware for realistic user experience in immersive VR, as well as the possibility to share adaptive algorithms. A practical implementation in Unity is provided as a functional prototype for feasibility tests. However, at the time of this paper, no controlled human-subject studies on the implementation have been noted, in fact, this is solely provided to show preliminary proof of concept. Future work will formally address the questions that are raised in this first run.

Keywords
Adaptive Production, Augmented Reality, Human-Robot Collaboration, Industry 4.0, Robotics, Unity Game Engine, Virtual Reality
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-216563 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2017.07.255 (DOI)000419072100151 ()2-s2.0-85029856140 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171108

Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2019-10-28Bibliographically approved
Kasperi, J., Picha Edwardsson, M. & Romero, M. (2017). Occlusion in outdoor Augmented Reality using geospatial building data. In: VRST '17 Proceedings of the 23rd ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology: . Paper presented at 23rd ACM Conference on Virtual Reality Software and Technology, VRST 2017, 8 November 2017 through 10 November 2017. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Part F131944, Article ID a30.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occlusion in outdoor Augmented Reality using geospatial building data
2017 (English)In: VRST '17 Proceedings of the 23rd ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, Vol. Part F131944, article id a30Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Aligning virtual and real objects in Augmented Reality (AR) is essential for the user experience. Without alignment, the user loses suspension of disbelief and the sense of depth, distance, and size. Occlusion is a key feature to be aligned. Virtual content should be partially or fully occluded if real world objects are in its line-of-sight. The challenge for simulating occlusion is to construct the geometric model of the environment. Earlier studies have aimed to create realistic occlusions, yet most have either required depth-sensing hardware or a static predened environment. is paper proposes and evaluates an alternative model-based method for dynamic outdoor AR of virtual buildings rendered on non depth-sensing smartphones. It uses geospatial data to construct the geometric model of real buildings surrounding the virtual building. The method removes the target regions from the virtual building using masks constructed from real buildings. While the method is not pixel-perfect, meaning that the simulated occlusion is not fully realistic, results from the user study indicate that it fullled its goal. A majority of the participants expressed that their experience and depth perception improved with the method activated. The result from this study has applications to mobile AR since the majority of smartphones are not equipped with depth sensors. Using geospatial data for simulating occlusions is a suciently eective solution until depth-sensing AR devices are more widely available.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017
Series
Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology, VRST
Keywords
AR, Augmented Reality, Geospatial data, Occlusion, Open Street Maps, Physical simulation
National Category
Other Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220740 (URN)10.1145/3139131.3139159 (DOI)2-s2.0-85038585895 (Scopus ID)9781450355483 (ISBN)
Conference
23rd ACM Conference on Virtual Reality Software and Technology, VRST 2017, 8 November 2017 through 10 November 2017
Note

QC 20180109

Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved
Romero, M. (2015). A Case Study in Expo-Based Learning Applied to Information Visualization. In: L. Kjelldahl and C. Peters (Ed.), SIGRAD 2015: . Paper presented at SIGRAD 2015, June 1-2, Stockholm, Sweden. Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Case Study in Expo-Based Learning Applied to Information Visualization
2015 (English)In: SIGRAD 2015 / [ed] L. Kjelldahl and C. Peters, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015, , p. 4Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present preliminary results of the effect of Expo-Based Learning (EBL) applied to a course on information visualization. We define EBL as project-based learning (PBL) augmented with constructively-aligned large public demos [RTP14]. In this paper, we analyze the results of challenging and grading enrolled students to compete and present their projects publicly at an open student competition organized by a second university. We surveyed the students at the end of the course before the competition started and the end of the competition. We present the result of the impact of the student competition as it relates to the intended learning outcomes from the perspective of the students.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. p. 4
Series
SIGRAD 2015
Keywords
Information visualization; pedagogy; augmented project based learning; large public demos
National Category
Computer Sciences Human Computer Interaction Learning
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences; Computer Science; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-184704 (URN)978-91-7685-855-4 (ISBN)
Conference
SIGRAD 2015, June 1-2, Stockholm, Sweden
Note

QC 20160407

Available from: 2016-04-03 Created: 2016-04-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Griggio, C. & Romero, M. (2015). A real-time dance visualization framework for the design of mappings that favor user appropriation. In: : . Paper presented at ACM Womencourage,Uppsala University, Sweden, 24-26 September 2015. ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A real-time dance visualization framework for the design of mappings that favor user appropriation
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present a real-time dance visualization framework with the goal of easily mapping motion data from an accelerometer and a gyroscope into visual effects that users can compose and appropriate to their own dancing style. We used this framework to design a set of dance-tovisuals mappings through a user-centered approach. As a result, we conclude with a list of factors that help users to understand how to interact with a real-time dance visualization with no prior instructions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Press, 2015
Keywords
Interactive dance visualization, real-time interpolated animations, accelerometer, gyroscope, smartphones as wearables
National Category
Computer Sciences Performing Art Studies
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction; Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-166014 (URN)
Conference
ACM Womencourage,Uppsala University, Sweden, 24-26 September 2015
Note

QC 20160407

Available from: 2016-04-03 Created: 2015-04-30 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Griggio, C. F. & Romero, M. (2015). Canvas Dance: An Interactive Dance Visualization for Large-Group Interaction. In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI EA '15 Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Interactivity (pp. 379-382). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Canvas Dance: An Interactive Dance Visualization for Large-Group Interaction
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 379-382Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present Canvas Dance, a prototype of an interactive dance visualization for large-group interaction that targets non-professional dancers in informal environments such as parties or nightclubs, and uses the smartphones of the dancers as the input device for the motion signal. The visualization is composed of individual representations for each dancer, and the visual mappings designed for their dance moves have three main goals: to help the users identify their own representation, to uncover and inspire imitation among dancers, and to support unpredictable dance moves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2015
Series
CHI EA ’15
Keywords
interactive dance visualizations, large-group interaction
National Category
Performing Art Studies Computer Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science; Art, Technology and Design; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-184682 (URN)10.1145/2702613.2725453 (DOI)2-s2.0-84954242023 (Scopus ID)978-145033146-3 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI EA '15 Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Interactivity
Note

QC 20160408

Available from: 2016-04-03 Created: 2016-04-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L., Tsaknaki, V., Lewandowski, V., Bresin, R., Hwang, S., Song, J., . . . Taylor, A. (2015). Demo Hour. interactions, 22(5), 6-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Demo Hour
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2015 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 6-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactivity is a unique forum of the ACM CHI Conference that showcases hands-on demonstrations, novel interactive technologies, and artistic installations. At CHI 2015 in Seoul we hosted more than 30 exhibits, including an invited digital interactive art exhibit. Interactivity highlights the diverse group of computer scientists, sociologists, designers, psychologists, artists, and many more who make up the CHI community.

Keywords
novel interactive technologies, artistic installation
National Category
Design Performing Art Studies Computer Sciences
Research subject
Art, Technology and Design; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-184681 (URN)10.1145/2807918 (DOI)
Note

QC 20190509

Available from: 2016-04-03 Created: 2016-04-03 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Romero, M., Björn, T., Peters, C. & Landazuri, N. (Eds.). (2015). Expo-Based Learning (EBL): Augmenting Project-Based Learning with Large Public Presentations. Paper presented at Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expo-Based Learning (EBL): Augmenting Project-Based Learning with Large Public Presentations
2015 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015
Series
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Keywords
Computer Science Learning, Education, Expo-Based Learning (EBL)
National Category
Computer Sciences Learning
Research subject
Education and Communication in the Technological Sciences; Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-184706 (URN)
Conference
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Note

QC 20160415

Available from: 2016-04-03 Created: 2016-04-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Munteanu, C., Molyneaux, H., Moncur, W., Romero, M., O'Donnell, S. & Vines, J. (2015). Situational ethics: Re-thinking approaches to formal ethics requirements for human-computer interaction. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings: . Paper presented at 33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015, 18 April 2015 through 23 April 2015 (pp. 105-114). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Situational ethics: Re-thinking approaches to formal ethics requirements for human-computer interaction
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2015 (English)In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 105-114Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Most Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) researchers are accustomed to the process of formal ethics review for their evaluation or field trial protocol. Although this process varies by country, the underlying principles are universal. While this process is often a formality, for field research or lab-based studies with vulnerable users, formal ethics requirements can be challenging to navigate - A common occurrence in the social sciences; yet, in many cases, foreign to HCI researchers. Nevertheless, with the increase in new areas of research such as mobile technologies for marginalized populations or assistive technologies, this is a current reality. In this paper we present our experiences and challenges in conducting several studies that evaluate interactive systems in difficult settings, from the perspective of the ethics process. Based on these, we draft recommendations for mitigating the effect of such challenges to the ethical conduct of research. We then issue a call for interaction researchers, together with policy makers, to refine existing ethics guidelines and protocols in order to more accurately capture the particularities of such field-based evaluations, qualitative studies, challenging labbased evaluations, and ethnographic observations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015
Keywords
Ethics, Field studies, Research protocol, Situational ethics, Vulnerable populations, Human engineering, Philosophical aspects, Human computer interaction
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-181623 (URN)10.1145/2702123.2702481 (DOI)000412395500015 ()2-s2.0-84951140168 (Scopus ID)9781450331456 (ISBN)
Conference
33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015, 18 April 2015 through 23 April 2015
Note

QC 20160316

Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4616-189X

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