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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Huang, Y., Poderi, G., Šćepanović, S., Hasselqvist, H., Warnier, M. & Brazier, F. (2019). Embedding internet-of-things in large-scale socio-technical systems: A community-oriented design in future smart grids. In: The Internet of Things for Smart Urban Ecosystems: (pp. 125-150). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embedding internet-of-things in large-scale socio-technical systems: A community-oriented design in future smart grids
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2019 (English)In: The Internet of Things for Smart Urban Ecosystems, Springer, 2019, p. 125-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In traditional engineering, technologies are viewed as the core of the engineering design, in a physical world with a large number of diverse technological artefacts. The real world, however, also includes a huge number of social components—people, communities, institutions, regulations and everything that exists in the human mind—that have shaped and been shaped by the technological components. Smart urban ecosystems are examples of large-scale Socio-Technical Systems (STS) that rely on technologies, in particular on the Internet-of-Things (IoT), within a complex social context where the technologies are embedded. Designing applications that embed both social complexity and IoT in large-scale STS requires a Socio-Technical (ST) approach, which has not yet entered the mainstream of design practice. This chapter reviews the literature and presents our experience of adopting an ST approach to the design of a community-oriented smart grid application. It discusses the challenges, process and outcomes of this apporach, and provides a set of lessons learned derived from this experience that are also deemed relevant to the design of other smart urban ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Internet of Things, ISSN 2199-1073, E-ISSN 2199-1081 ; F2
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236340 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-96550-5_6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85051746524 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-96549-9 (ISBN)978-3-319-96550-5 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20181108

Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2018-11-08Bibliographically approved
Hasselqvist, H. & Eriksson, E. (2018). Designing for Diverse Stakeholder Engagement in Resource-Intensive Practices. In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: . Paper presented at 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2018, Oslo, Norway, 29 September 2018 through 3 October 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Diverse Stakeholder Engagement in Resource-Intensive Practices
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite many contributions to Sustainable HCI stressing the importance of “moving beyond the individual”, a majority of HCI work is still targeted mainly at consumers or resource users. However, many stakeholders influence resource use and including such stakeholders in design work can open up new design opportunities for supporting sustainable practices. In this paper, we present results from a longitudinal study of practices related to energy improvement work in housing cooperatives. During the study, we discovered new opportunities for interactive technologies to support this work when we involved various stakeholders other than housing cooperatives. In addition, we discuss more general implications for design aiming to support diverse stakeholder engagement in practices related to resource use: which stakeholders and practices to include, temporal aspects of engagement, and opportunities for supporting shared responsibility for resource use.

Keywords
Sustainable HCI, resource use, resource-intensive practices, energy, stakeholders, design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Information and Communication Technology; Media Technology; Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235987 (URN)10.1145/3240167.3240193 (DOI)000455775700038 ()2-s2.0-85056604060 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-6437-9 (ISBN)
Conference
10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2018, Oslo, Norway, 29 September 2018 through 3 October 2018
Funder
Swedish Energy AgencyEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme
Note

QC 20181012

Available from: 2018-10-11 Created: 2018-10-11 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Hesselgren, M., Hasselqvist, H. & Sopjani, L. (2017). Design strategies for exploring and bridging: Intersections of everyday life and decisionmaking for sustainability. In: Erik Bohemia ; Cees de Bont ; Lisbeth Svengren Holm (Ed.), Conference proceedings of the Design Management Academy: Research perspectives on creative intersections. Paper presented at Design Management Academy Conference 2017, Hong Kong 7–9 June 2017 (pp. 189-205). Glasgow, 1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design strategies for exploring and bridging: Intersections of everyday life and decisionmaking for sustainability
2017 (English)In: Conference proceedings of the Design Management Academy: Research perspectives on creative intersections / [ed] Erik Bohemia ; Cees de Bont ; Lisbeth Svengren Holm, Glasgow, 2017, Vol. 1, p. 189-205Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Transitions of unsustainable everyday practices into more sustainable ones require new approaches to explore possible futures and encourage change. Trying new practices and experiencing alternative configurations of sociomaterial assemblages can increase reflexivity as well as assist in exploring potential futures. Design can assist in co-creating possible futures and bridging discussions about the preferred strategies to reach them. If sustainability is defined as an on-going process calling for dialogue, there could be potentials for using practice-based design research, and in particular co-design approaches, at the intersections of these dialogues. By analysing methods for reflexivity and collaboration in two design research projects within sustainable mobility, we here suggest design strategies for prototyping change at an individual level and communicating the experiences of such change to people with power to trigger and direct change. This may be particularly useful for addressing sustainability which both requires dealing with complex problems and extensive collaboration. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Glasgow: , 2017
Keywords
sustainable mobility; co-design; bridging; living prototypes
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-241906 (URN)10.21606/dma.2017.101 (DOI)978-1-912294-11-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Design Management Academy Conference 2017, Hong Kong 7–9 June 2017
Note

QC 20190130

Available from: 2019-01-25 Created: 2019-01-25 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Hasselqvist, H., Hesselgren, M. & Bogdan, C. (2016). Challenging the Car Norm: Opportunitites for ICT to Support Sustainable Transportation Practices. In: CHI '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI'16 (pp. 1300-1311). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenging the Car Norm: Opportunitites for ICT to Support Sustainable Transportation Practices
2016 (English)In: CHI '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 1300-1311Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The use of practices as a unit of analysis has been suggested in order to scale up efforts within sustainable HCI and to shift the focus from changing individual behaviours to supporting transitions at a societal level. In this paper, we take a practice approach to the case of sustainable transportation, and more specifically to car-free transportation. Car use is intertwined in many practices and managing life without a car is difficult, particularly for people in contexts where owning at least one car per family is the norm. We studied three families in Stockholm who replaced their cars with different combinations of light electric vehicles during one year. From the families' experiences, we identified a number of opportunities for designers of interactive technologies to support environmental pioneers in the particular case of car-free living, as well as to support transitions towards sustainable practices in general.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2016
Keywords
Practice theory; Practice-oriented design; Sustainable HCI; Transportation
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Information and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-188182 (URN)10.1145/2858036.2858468 (DOI)000380532901033 ()2-s2.0-85015073778 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-3362-7 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI'16
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20160610

Available from: 2016-06-08 Created: 2016-06-08 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Hasselqvist, H., Bogdan, C. & Kis, F. (2016). Linking Data to Action: Designing for Amateur Energy Management. In: DIS 2016 - Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Fuse: . Paper presented at 11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2016, Gardens Point Campus of Queensland University of Technology (QUT)Brisbane, Australia, 4 June 2016 through 8 June 2016 (pp. 473-483). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linking Data to Action: Designing for Amateur Energy Management
2016 (English)In: DIS 2016 - Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Fuse, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 473-483Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Design of eco-feedback has primarily aimed at persuading individuals to change behaviours into more environmentally sustainable ones. However, it has been questioned how effective such feedback is in supporting long-term change. As an alternative focus for energy feedback, we present a case study of amateur energy management work in apartment buildings owned by housing cooperatives, and the design of an app that aims to stimulate and support cooperatives in taking energy actions that significantly reduce the cooperative’s collective energy use. By linking energy data to energy actions, the users can see how actions taken in their own and other cooperatives affected the energy use, learn from each other’s experiences and become motivated as energy amateurs. Based on our housing cooperative case, we reflect on design aspects to consider when designing for energy management in amateur settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016
Keywords
Sustainable HCI, Interaction Design, Energy, Housing Cooperatives, Amateur Community
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-189167 (URN)10.1145/2901790.2901837 (DOI)000390478300046 ()2-s2.0-84978696610 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4031-1 (ISBN)
Conference
11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2016, Gardens Point Campus of Queensland University of Technology (QUT)Brisbane, Australia, 4 June 2016 through 8 June 2016
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 608774StandUp
Note

QC 20160714

Available from: 2016-06-28 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Kis, F. & Hasselqvist, H. (2016). Prototyping with data: designer needs and tool support. Paper presented at 11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2016, Gardens Point Campus of Queensland University of Technology (QUT)Brisbane, Australia, 4 June 2016 through 8 June 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prototyping with data: designer needs and tool support
2016 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

With large amounts of data available for interactive applications, data is becoming an increasingly important material in the design process. Consequently, including real data in prototyping work and early design iterations is desired, but prototyping tools currently allow mostly prototyping with dummy and static data. Programming skills are often required for prototyping with real data, which can be a problem for designers lacking such skills or when design ideas quickly need to be tested. We have analyzed approaches for prototyping with data taken by commercial prototyping tools targeted specifically at designers and we compare these solutions to data-related prototyping needs identified in a study, including interviews and prototyping tasks, with 7 design practitioners. We provide details on why and when prototyping with real data is valuable in the design process and we analyze challenges that designers may face when prototyping with data. Finally, we give a number of suggestions for prototyping tools aiming to support designers in prototyping with real data.

Keywords
prototyping, data-driven applications, interaction design, prototyping tools
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-196841 (URN)978-1-4503-4031-1 (ISBN)
Conference
11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2016, Gardens Point Campus of Queensland University of Technology (QUT)Brisbane, Australia, 4 June 2016 through 8 June 2016
Note

QC 20161124

Available from: 2016-11-23 Created: 2016-11-23 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Hesselgren, M., Hasselqvist, H. & Eriksson, E. (2015). A Car-free Year: Providing vehicles for change. In: Design Ecologies: Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures. Paper presented at Nordes 2015, Konstfack – University College of Arts, Crafts and Design. Stockholm, Sweden Sunday 7 – Wednesday 10 June 2015. Nordes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Car-free Year: Providing vehicles for change
2015 (English)In: Design Ecologies: Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, Nordes , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes an interventionist design research project called a Car-free Year, where three families substitute their cars for a fleet of light electric vehicles during one year. The aim is to study how this intervention changes the families’ everyday practices, as well as suggest how design can support and sustain such a change on a larger scale. If radically new paradigms are to be shaped, changes are needed both in what is considered normalities and in people’s everyday practices. We argue that design can play an important role in the transition towards more sustainable futures and new normalities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordes, 2015
Series
Design Ecologies, ISSN 1604-9705 ; 6
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-173372 (URN)
Conference
Nordes 2015, Konstfack – University College of Arts, Crafts and Design. Stockholm, Sweden Sunday 7 – Wednesday 10 June 2015
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20151015

Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-10 Last updated: 2017-04-25Bibliographically approved
Hasselqvist, H. & Bogdan, C. (2015). Designing for Energy Engagement in Housing Cooperatives. In: : . Paper presented at Critical Alternatives 2015, August 17-21 2015, Aarhus, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Energy Engagement in Housing Cooperatives
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Within the current Swedish housing market it is increasingly difficult to get a contract for a rental apartment, therefore people who might have had public housing as a first choice are forced to buy an apartment instead. When buying apartments they become part of housing cooperatives whereby the residents have in theory a high power to influence their living environment, but few people take advantage of that power.

We have studied housing cooperative engagement in Stockholm, Sweden, related to collective energy issues and the opportunities of supporting such engagement with design of interactive technologies. In this paper we present the results of a case study of amateur energy management in housing cooperatives and a concept for a housing cooperative energy app that aims both to support the work of energy managers and to provide other members with a low-effort entrance to collective energy matters.

Keywords
Housing Cooperatives, Amateur Communities, Sustainability, Energy, Interaction Design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-172342 (URN)
Conference
Critical Alternatives 2015, August 17-21 2015, Aarhus, Denmark
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 608774StandUp
Note

Workshop position paper

QC 20150826

Available from: 2015-08-19 Created: 2015-08-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Hasselqvist, H., Bogdan, C., Romero, M. & Shafqat, O. (2015). Supporting Energy Management as a Cooperative Amateur Activity. In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI 2015,April 18 - 23, 2015, Seoul, Korea (pp. 1483-1488). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting Energy Management as a Cooperative Amateur Activity
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 1483-1488Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is increasing concern regarding current energy feedback approaches as they focus on the individual level, and mostly on household electricity, while the bulk of energy use often lies in heating and cooling. The aim is typically to change user routines, which does not bring a long-lasting impact. In our case study, we address these concerns for apartment buildings by looking at housing cooperatives, the dominant form of apartment ownership in the Nordic countries. These cooperatives manage the heating costs in common and therefore have a large potential for energy saving through long-lasting improvements and investments. We also emphasise the amateur nature of energy work within such cooperatives and consider the implications of our field study findings, interpreted through these amateur and cooperative perspectives, for the design of interactive artefacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2015
Keywords
Eco-feedback, Energy-efficiency, Amateur, Energy cooperative
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-167994 (URN)10.1145/2702613.2732724 (DOI)2-s2.0-84954201607 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI 2015,April 18 - 23, 2015, Seoul, Korea
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 608774StandUp
Note

QC 20150617

Available from: 2015-05-25 Created: 2015-05-25 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Hasselqvist, H. & Bogdan, C. (2014). Design with people in multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural project consortia: A set of Guidelines. In: : . Paper presented at DRS 2014, Umeå June 16-19 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design with people in multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural project consortia: A set of Guidelines
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Design methods, Sustainability
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-166787 (URN)
Conference
DRS 2014, Umeå June 16-19 2014
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 608774
Note

Position paper for the workshop: Designing with people in sustainability and behaviour change research

Available from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3163-7296

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