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Abenoza, R. F., Romero-Torres, J., Cats, O. & Susilo, Y. O. (2020). User experiences and perceptions of women-only transport services in Mexico. In: Gendering Smart Mobilities: (pp. 188-209). Taylor and Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User experiences and perceptions of women-only transport services in Mexico
2020 (English)In: Gendering Smart Mobilities, Taylor and Francis , 2020, p. 188-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Personal safety perceptions impact upon not only travellers’ behaviour and satisfaction but may also diminish their general well-being and health. These effects are particularly negative among female travellers, a group which feels especially vulnerable from certain types of aggression. To tackle women’s personal safety problems several cities around the world introduced transport for women only. Data from Mexico City and its metropolitan area is used to examine how the characteristics of female travellers and of their trips impact upon travel satisfaction with public transport for women only for different travel modes (metro, city bus, and metropolitan BRT) and users based on their previous victimisation. This chapter demonstrates that female travellers’ appreciation of public transport for women only services varies as a function of some of their socio-demographic and travel characteristics (some age groups, trip purposes, and travel frequency). Considering the strength of the marginal effect’s coefficient from a number of ordered logit models three travel attributes should be prioritised: (1) level of satisfaction with travelling with women only, (2) reducing exposure to verbal aggressions, (3) and meeting travellers’ waiting time expectations. This study may help stakeholders identify, target, and prioritise female travellers’ groups which are least satisfied with the service. In addition, this chapter provides some policy recommendations and highlights the role of infrastructure that may help improve the overall travel experience. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis, 2020
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-311134 (URN)10.4324/9780429466601-11 (DOI)2-s2.0-85112738608 (Scopus ID)
Note

Part of book: ISBN 9780429882135, QC 20220420

Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Abenoza, R., Cats, O. & Susilo, Y. (2019). Determinants of traveler satisfaction: Evidence for non-linear and asymmetric effects. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 66, 339-356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants of traveler satisfaction: Evidence for non-linear and asymmetric effects
2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 66, p. 339-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Classifying public transport service attributes based on their influence on overall traveler satisfaction can assist stakeholders and practitioners in introducing cost-efficient measures. To date most studies employed methods that were based on the assumption that the impact of service attributes on traveler satisfaction is entirely linear and symmetric. This study examines whether service attributes have a non-linear and asymmetric influence on the overall travel experience by employing the Three-factor theory (basic, performance and exciting factors). The analysis is conducted for different traveler segments depending on their level of captivity, travel frequency by public transport and travel mode used, and is based on a relatively large sample size collected for Stockholm County. Moreover, the estimated models control for important socio-demographic and travel characteristics that have been insofar overlooked. Results are presented in the form of a series of multi-level cubes that represent different essentiality of traveler needs which provide a useful methodological framework to further design quality service improvements that can be applied to various geographical contexts. Our findings highlight that a “one size fits all” approach is not adequate for identifying the needs of distinct traveler segments and of travelers using different travel modes. Furthermore, two-thirds of the attributes are consistently classified into the same factor category which entails important policy implications. This research deepens and expands the very limited knowledge of the application of the three-factor theory in the transport field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Customer satisfaction, Public transport, Three-factor theory, Public policy, Asymmetric effects, Methodological frameworks, Policy implications, Public transport service, Service attributes, Travel experiences
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Transport Science, Transport Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-263541 (URN)10.1016/j.trf.2019.09.009 (DOI)000496865700025 ()2-s2.0-85072571103 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191128

Available from: 2019-11-28 Created: 2019-11-28 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Abenoza, R. F., Liu, C., Cats, O. & Susilo, Y. (2019). What is the role of weather, built-environment and accessibility geographical characteristics in influencing travelers’ experience?. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 122, 34-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the role of weather, built-environment and accessibility geographical characteristics in influencing travelers’ experience?
2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 122, p. 34-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examine the effect of weather, accessibility and built-environment characteristics on overall travel experience as well as the experience with the latest trips. These are factors that are often disregarded in the travel satisfaction literature even though they are believed to largely influence the first mile of the door-to-door trip. This study fills a research gap in investigating all these factors by using, amongst other, a relatively large travel satisfaction survey from years 2009 to 2015 and by focusing on urban and peri-urban geographical contexts, the city and county of Stockholm (Sweden), respectively. The ordered logit model results show that county dwellers living close to a metro station and in well linked-to-all areas report higher overall travel satisfaction evaluations. In addition, precipitation and ground covered with snow have a negative influence on travel satisfaction. Our findings indicate that built-environment characteristics exert a rather weak influence on the travel experience, especially in the peri-urban context. However, some aspects such as living in areas with medium densities, low income and with high safety perceptions around public transport stations are associated with higher satisfaction levels. In turn, areas with single land uses are found to have lower travel satisfactions. These results are important for public transport planners and designers in devising measures to prevent and mitigate the negative outcome of some weather conditions and to conceive better designed transit oriented developments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Accessibility, Built-environment, Customer satisfaction, First and last-mile, Ordered logit models, Weather
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246456 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2019.01.026 (DOI)000465061400003 ()2-s2.0-85061906067 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Integrated Transport Research Lab (ITRL)
Note

Not duplicate with DiVA 1272342

QC 20190320

Available from: 2019-03-20 Created: 2019-03-20 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Abenoza, R. F., Ettema, D. F. & Susilo, Y. O. (2018). Do accessibility, vulnerability, opportunity, and travel characteristics have uniform impacts on the traveler's experience?. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 114, 38-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do accessibility, vulnerability, opportunity, and travel characteristics have uniform impacts on the traveler's experience?
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 114, p. 38-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240787 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2018.03.017 (DOI)000452692200005 ()2-s2.0-85044303095 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190110

Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Fernandez Abenoza, R., Ettema, D. & Octavius Susilo, Y. (2018). Do accessibility, vulnerability, opportunity, and travel characteristics have uniform impacts on traveler experience?. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 114, 38-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do accessibility, vulnerability, opportunity, and travel characteristics have uniform impacts on traveler experience?
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 114, p. 38-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using a door-to-door travel survey (METPEX) for Stockholm and the year 2014, this study analyzed the effects of quality of infrastructure and design of public transport premises on the overall travel experience and on the trip stages for different traveler segments. The market segmentation approach was based on travel characteristics, captivity, vulnerability and travel attitudes which were either found to be impactful in previous literature or that had not been deeply explored.

 

A latent class cluster model segmentation process yields 4 traveler segments: i) content urban commuters, ii) unfulfilled rural travelers, iii) active leisure travelers, and, iv) vulnerable mode switchers. The model estimation results show similarities in terms of appreciations and needs between the attributes that influence the whole trip and the different trip stages. Two attributes are found to be of outermost importance across all trip stages but especially for the whole trip and the main mode: travel modes integration and quality of infrastructure for the entire trip.

 

This study also unveils particularities and important differences amongst different trip stages and traveler segments. Therefore stakeholders would do well in treating travelers differently when evaluating infrastructure and design characteristics of PT. This study can help stakeholders to tailor their policies to tackle with specific traveler’s needs.

Keywords
customer satisfaction, service quality, public transport, door-to-door journey, infrastructure
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-238640 (URN)
Note

QC 20181106

Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Abenoza, R., Cats, O. & Susilo, Y. (2018). How does travel satisfaction sum up?: Decomposing the door-to-door experience for multimodal trips. Transportation, 46(5), 1615-1642
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does travel satisfaction sum up?: Decomposing the door-to-door experience for multimodal trips
2018 (English)In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, E-ISSN 1572-9435, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 1615-1642Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding how satisfaction with individual trip legs aggregates to the overall travel experience for different types of trips will enable the identification of the trip legs that are most impactful. For this purpose we analyze data on retrospective evaluations of entire multi-modal trip experiences and satisfaction with individual trip legs. We formulate and describe alternative aggregation rules and underpin them in theory and previous empirical findings. The results of a series of regression models show that for a large number of multi-modal trip configurations normative rules can better reproduce overall travel satisfaction than heuristic rules. This indicates that all trip legs need to be considered when evaluating the overall travel experience, especially for trips legs involving waiting and/or transferring time. In particular, weighting satisfaction with individual trip legs with perceived trip leg durations yielded the best predictor of overall travel satisfaction. No evidence for a disproportional effect of the last or most exceptional part of the trip was found. This research contributes to the literature on combining multi-episodic experiences and provides novel empirical evidence in the transport domain. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Customer Satisfaction, Public Transport, Trip legs, Multimodal trips
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Transport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200729 (URN)10.1007/s11116-018-9860-0 (DOI)000491070300004 ()2-s2.0-85041502425 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170202

Available from: 2017-02-01 Created: 2017-02-01 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Abenoza, R., Ceccato, V., Susilo, Y. O. & Cats, O. (2018). Individual, Travel, and Bus Stop Characteristics Influencing Travelers’ Safety Perceptions. TRR Journal of transportation research board
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual, Travel, and Bus Stop Characteristics Influencing Travelers’ Safety Perceptions
2018 (English)In: TRR Journal of transportation research board, ISSN 0361-1981Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ensuring safety during door-to-door public transport trips is a fundamental challenge to service providers as safety influences individuals’ mobility. Using reported safety perceptions of travelers waiting at six bus stops with different characteristics in Stockholm, this study investigates factors that have an impact on determining travelers’ perceived safety and crime perceptions. This is done by assessing the importance of real-time information provision and the environmental characteristics of bus stops during the day and at night for different types of crime, after controlling for travelers’ individual and trip characteristics, and their previous experiences of victimization. Interaction effects of age, gender, and travel frequency are also tested. The  results  suggest  that  bus  shelter  characteristics,  natural  surveillance,  and  trustworthy  real-time  information  are  the most important factors influencing safety and crime perceptions. Additionally, safety perceptions are strongly influenced by previous experiences of victimization. The effect of perceived feelings about crime and safety are found to be nuanced by age and gender. Unlike some common beliefs, travelers: (1) feel less worried about becoming a victim of crime at bus stops associated with high crime rates; (2) prefer opaque shelters at night; and (3) have higher safety perceptions when the stop is located in an area of mixed land use. The impact of a bus stop’s number of passers-by is found to be insignificant. No direct or indirect effects can be attributed to frequency of travel by bus, indicating that familiar places and routine behavior have noeffect on declared crime and safety perceptions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
bus stops, Stockholm, physical and social characteristics, modelling
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-233896 (URN)10.1177/0361198118758677 (DOI)000469284000003 ()2-s2.0-85045236948 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220510

Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2024-03-18Bibliographically approved
Abenoza, R., Cats, O. & Susilo, Y. (2018). Investigating the nature of Public Transport service attributes. Transportation Science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating the nature of Public Transport service attributes
2018 (English)In: Transportation Science, ISSN 0041-1655, E-ISSN 1526-5447Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Classifying public transport service attributes based on their influence on overall traveler satisfaction can assist stakeholders and practitioners in introducing cost-efficient measures. To date most studies employed methods that were based on the assumption that the impact of service attributes on traveler satisfaction is entirely linear and symmetric. This study examines whether service attributes have a non-linear and asymmetric influence on the overall travel experience by employing the Three-factor theory (basic, performance and exciting factors). The analysis is conducted for different traveler segments depending on their level of captivity, travel frequency by public transport and travel mode used, and is based on a relatively large sample size collected for Stockholm County. Moreover, the estimated models control for important socio-demographic and travel characteristics that have been insofar overlooked. Results are presented in the form of a series of multi-level cubes that represent different essentiality of traveler needs which provide a useful methodological framework to further design quality service improvements that can be applied to various geographical contexts. Our findings highlight that a “one size fits all” approach is not adequate for identifying the needs of distinct traveler segments and of travelers using different travel modes. Furthermore, two-thirds of the attributes are consistently classified into the same factor category which entails important policy implications. This research deepens and expands the very limited knowledge of the application of the three-factor theory in the transport field.

Keywords
Public Transport, customer satisfaction, three-factor theory
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Transport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240427 (URN)
Funder
Stockholm County Council, 20160903
Note

QC 20181218

Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Woodcock, A., Susilo, Y., Diana, M., Abenoza, R., Pirra, M. & Tovey, M. (2018). Measuring mobility and transport services: The METPEX project. In: AHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2017: . Paper presented at AHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2017, Los Angeles, United States, 17 July 2017 through 21 July 2017 (pp. 1036-1045). Springer, 597
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring mobility and transport services: The METPEX project
Show others...
2018 (English)In: AHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2017, Springer, 2018, Vol. 597, p. 1036-1045Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Public transport is key to access social, economic, civic and cultural life. However, there is still a need to better understand (1) the needs of all transport users and (2) transport provision in cities and regions. The development of an inclusive, validated, passenger experience measurement instrument is the first step in understanding the whole journey, multi-modal journeys. Such a validated tool would enable resources to be focused on areas which travelers felt most important. Such information could be used to create high quality, user centred, integrated, accessible public transport services, capable of attracting and retaining public transport users whilst meeting sustainability targets. This paper describes the METPEX project and the derivation of a set of Key Performance Indicators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 2194-5357 ; 597
Keywords
Journey mode, KPIs, Measurement instrument, Passenger experience, User needs
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-213188 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-60441-1_98 (DOI)000448241200098 ()2-s2.0-85022324840 (Scopus ID)9783319604404 (ISBN)
Conference
AHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2017, Los Angeles, United States, 17 July 2017 through 21 July 2017
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-SCP2-GA-2012-314354
Note

QC 20170830

Available from: 2017-08-30 Created: 2017-08-30 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
F. Abenoza, R., Liu, C., Cats, O. & Octavius Susilo, Y. (2018). What is the role of weather, built-environment and accessibility geographical characteristics in influencing travelers’ experience?. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the role of weather, built-environment and accessibility geographical characteristics in influencing travelers’ experience?
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

We examine the effect of weather, accessibility and built-environment characteristics on overall travel experience as well as the experience with the latest trips. These are factors that are often disregarded in the travel satisfaction literature even though they are believed to largely influence the first mile of the door-to-door trip. This study fills a research gap in investigating all these factors by using, amongst other, a relatively large travel satisfaction survey from years 2009 to 2015 and by focusing on urban and peri-urban geographical contexts, the city and county of Stockholm (Sweden), respectively. The results show that county dwellers living close to a metro station and in well linked-to-all areas report higher overall travel satisfaction evaluations. In addition, precipitation and ground covered with snow have a negative influence on travel satisfaction. Our findings indicate that built-environment characteristics exert a rather weak influence on the travel experience, especially in the peri-urban context. However, some aspects such as living in areas with medium densities, low income and with high safety perceptions around public transport stations are associated with higher satisfaction levels. In turn, areas with single land uses are found to have lower travel satisfactions. These results are important for public transport planners and designers in devising measures to prevent and mitigate the negative outcome of some weather conditions and to conceive better designed transit oriented developments.

Keywords
customer satisfaction, built-environment, accessibility, weather, safety perceptions, door-to-door trips, ordered logit models, access, first and last-mile
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Transport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240426 (URN)
Funder
Stockholm County Council, 2016090
Note

QC 201812109

Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9875-3980

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