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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Abenoza, R., Cats, O. & Susilo, Y. (2018). How does travel satisfaction sum up?: Decomposing the door-to-door experience for multimodal trips. Transportation, 1-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does travel satisfaction sum up?: Decomposing the door-to-door experience for multimodal trips
2018 (English)In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, E-ISSN 1572-9435, p. 1-28Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding how satisfaction with individual trip legs aggregates to the overall travel experience for different types of trips will enable the identification of the trip legs that are most impactful. For this purpose we analyze data on retrospective evaluations of entire multi-modal trip experiences and satisfaction with individual trip legs. We formulate and describe alternative aggregation rules and underpin them in theory and previous empirical findings. The results of a series of regression models show that for a large number of multi-modal trip configurations normative rules can better reproduce overall travel satisfaction than heuristic rules. This indicates that all trip legs need to be considered when evaluating the overall travel experience, especially for trips legs involving waiting and/or transferring time. In particular, weighting satisfaction with individual trip legs with perceived trip leg durations yielded the best predictor of overall travel satisfaction. No evidence for a disproportional effect of the last or most exceptional part of the trip was found. This research contributes to the literature on combining multi-episodic experiences and provides novel empirical evidence in the transport domain. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Customer Satisfaction, Public Transport, Trip legs, Multimodal trips
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Transport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-200729 (URN)10.1007/s11116-018-9860-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-85041502425 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170202

Available from: 2017-02-01 Created: 2017-02-01 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Abenoza, R., Ceccato, V., Susilo, Y. O. & Cats, O. (2018). Individual, Travel, and Bus Stop Characteristics Influencing Travelers’ Safety Perceptions. TRR Journal of transportation research board
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual, Travel, and Bus Stop Characteristics Influencing Travelers’ Safety Perceptions
2018 (English)In: TRR Journal of transportation research boardArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ensuring safety during door-to-door public transport trips is a fundamental challenge to service providers as safety influences individuals’ mobility. Using reported safety perceptions of travelers waiting at six bus stops with different characteristics in Stockholm, this study investigates factors that have an impact on determining travelers’ perceived safety and crime perceptions. This is done by assessing the importance of real-time information provision and the environmental characteristics of bus stops during the day and at night for different types of crime, after controlling for travelers’ individual and trip characteristics, and their previous experiences of victimization. Interaction effects of age, gender, and travel frequency are also tested. The  results  suggest  that  bus  shelter  characteristics,  natural  surveillance,  and  trustworthy  real-time  information  are  the most important factors influencing safety and crime perceptions. Additionally, safety perceptions are strongly influenced by previous experiences of victimization. The effect of perceived feelings about crime and safety are found to be nuanced by age and gender. Unlike some common beliefs, travelers: (1) feel less worried about becoming a victim of crime at bus stops associated with high crime rates; (2) prefer opaque shelters at night; and (3) have higher safety perceptions when the stop is located in an area of mixed land use. The impact of a bus stop’s number of passers-by is found to be insignificant. No direct or indirect effects can be attributed to frequency of travel by bus, indicating that familiar places and routine behavior have noeffect on declared crime and safety perceptions.

Keywords
bus stops, Stockholm, physical and social characteristics, modelling
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-233896 (URN)10.1177/0361198118758677 (DOI)2-s2.0-85045236948 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180903

Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Abenoza, R., Cats, O. & Susilo, Y. (2018). Investigating the nature of Public Transport service attributes. Transportation Science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating the nature of Public Transport service attributes
2018 (English)In: Transportation Science, ISSN 0041-1655, E-ISSN 1526-5447Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Classifying public transport service attributes based on their influence on overall traveler satisfaction can assist stakeholders and practitioners in introducing cost-efficient measures. To date most studies employed methods that were based on the assumption that the impact of service attributes on traveler satisfaction is entirely linear and symmetric. This study examines whether service attributes have a non-linear and asymmetric influence on the overall travel experience by employing the Three-factor theory (basic, performance and exciting factors). The analysis is conducted for different traveler segments depending on their level of captivity, travel frequency by public transport and travel mode used, and is based on a relatively large sample size collected for Stockholm County. Moreover, the estimated models control for important socio-demographic and travel characteristics that have been insofar overlooked. Results are presented in the form of a series of multi-level cubes that represent different essentiality of traveler needs which provide a useful methodological framework to further design quality service improvements that can be applied to various geographical contexts. Our findings highlight that a “one size fits all” approach is not adequate for identifying the needs of distinct traveler segments and of travelers using different travel modes. Furthermore, two-thirds of the attributes are consistently classified into the same factor category which entails important policy implications. This research deepens and expands the very limited knowledge of the application of the three-factor theory in the transport field.

Keywords
Public Transport, customer satisfaction, three-factor theory
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Transport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240427 (URN)
Funder
Stockholm County Council, 20160903
Note

QC 20181218

Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Susilo, Y., Woodcock, A., Liotopoulos, F., Duarte, A., Osmond, J., Abenoza, R., . . . Pirra, M. (2017). Deploying traditional and smartphone app survey methods in measuring door-to-door travel satisfaction in eight European cities. In: Ulengin, F Li, K Boltze, M (Ed.), WORLD CONFERENCE ON TRANSPORT RESEARCH - WCTR 2016: . Paper presented at 14th World Conference on Transport Research (WCTR), JUL 10-15, 2016, Tongji Univ Shanghai, Shanghai, PEOPLES R CHINA (pp. 2262-2280).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deploying traditional and smartphone app survey methods in measuring door-to-door travel satisfaction in eight European cities
Show others...
2017 (English)In: WORLD CONFERENCE ON TRANSPORT RESEARCH - WCTR 2016 / [ed] Ulengin, F Li, K Boltze, M, 2017, p. 2262-2280Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study describes the lessons learned from designing, deploying and analysing the results from different travel satisfaction survey tools which measures the travellers' door-to-door travel satisfaction. The travel satisfaction measurement survey tools tested consisted of two types of smartphone applications (a satellite navigation app and a game app), an on-line survey, a paper based semi-structured questionnaire and a focus group questionnaire. Each of the measurement tools comprised the same set of basic questions, but in different formats, aimed at exploring the pros and cons of each tool among different groups of travellers. The data collection was carried out at eight different European cities and five FIA motorist networks. 5,275 valid responses were gathered from the survey. Further analysis results show that different survey methods performed better in different sites. The satisfaction that was gathered via main trip leg does not necessarily correspond with overall satisfaction of the door-to-door journey. The results of this study highlight the need for more inclusive, complete, door-to-door, travel survey measurements.

Series
Transportation Research Procedia, ISSN 2352-1465 ; 25
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-211763 (URN)10.1016/j.trpro.2017.05.434 (DOI)000404963802026 ()2-s2.0-85019397791 (Scopus ID)
Conference
14th World Conference on Transport Research (WCTR), JUL 10-15, 2016, Tongji Univ Shanghai, Shanghai, PEOPLES R CHINA
Note

QC 20170811

Available from: 2017-08-11 Created: 2017-08-11 Last updated: 2017-08-11Bibliographically approved
Cats, O., Abenoza, R., Liu, C. & Susilo, Y. (2015). Evolution of Satisfaction with Public Transport and Its Determinants in Sweden Identifying Priority Areas. Transportation Research Record (2538), 86-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of Satisfaction with Public Transport and Its Determinants in Sweden Identifying Priority Areas
2015 (English)In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, no 2538, p. 86-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Measuring and analysing satisfaction with public transport services facilitates service performance monitoring, market analysis, benchmarking and the identification of priority areas. The systematic and regular collection of information concerning satisfaction enables to investigate how passengers’ satisfaction as well as its determinants changes over time. These changes may be driven by changes in service quality or shifts in passengers’ expectations and preferences. This study analyses how satisfaction with public transport and its determinants evolved over time in Sweden in the years 2001-2013. The determinants of satisfaction are identified based on a factor analysis and the estimation of multivariate satisfaction models. The superposition of our findings culminates in a dynamic passenger satisfaction priority map which allows identifying priority areas based on observed trends in satisfaction with service attributes and their respective importance. The deterioration of overall satisfaction with public transport in Sweden in recent years is driven by a decrease in satisfaction with customer interface and length of trip time. These two service aspects as well as operation were found key determinants of overall satisfaction which users consistently rate among the least satisfactory. The results of this study are instrumental in supporting service providers in designing measures that will foster satisfaction in the future.

Keywords
Service Quality, Passengers, Utility, Trips, Modes
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-165859 (URN)10.3141/2538-10 (DOI)000372134700010 ()2-s2.0-84976649915 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160418

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9875-3980

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