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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Nilsson, M., Chisholm, E., Griggs, D., Howden-Chapman, P., McCollum, D., Messerli, P., . . . Stafford-Smith, M. (2018). Mapping interactions between the sustainable development goals: lessons learned and ways forward. Sustainability Science, 13(6), 1489-1503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping interactions between the sustainable development goals: lessons learned and ways forward
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2018 (English)In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1489-1503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pursuing integrated research and decision-making to advance action on the sustainable development goals (SDGs) fundamentally depends on understanding interactions between the SDGs, both negative ones (trade-offs) and positive ones (co-benefits). This quest, triggered by the 2030 Agenda, has however pointed to a gap in current research and policy analysis regarding how to think systematically about interactions across the SDGs. This paper synthesizes experiences and insights from the application of a new conceptual framework for mapping and assessing SDG interactions using a defined typology and characterization approach. Drawing on results from a major international research study applied to the SDGs on health, energy and the ocean, it analyses how interactions depend on key factors such as geographical context, resource endowments, time horizon and governance. The paper discusses the future potential, barriers and opportunities for applying the approach in scientific research, in policy making and in bridging the two through a global SDG Interactions Knowledge Platform as a key mechanism for assembling, systematizing and aggregating knowledge on interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER JAPAN KK, 2018
Keywords
2030 Agenda, Interlinkages, Connections, SDG, Development, Knowledge platform
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240013 (URN)10.1007/s11625-018-0604-z (DOI)000451064100002 ()2-s2.0-85049829208 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

QC 20181210

Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Crépin, A.-S., Finnveden, G., Hennlock, M., Neij, L., Nilsson, M., Engström, G., . . . Turesson, A. (2018). Möjligheter och begränsningar med samhällsekonomiska analyser.. Stockholm: Vetenskapliga rådet för hållbar utveckling.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Möjligheter och begränsningar med samhällsekonomiska analyser.
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2018 (Swedish)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Vetenskapliga rådet för hållbar utveckling., 2018
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-250591 (URN)
Note

QC 20190612

Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Blomstedt, Y., Bhutta, Z. A., Dahlstrand, J., Friberg, P., Gostin, L. O., Nilsson, M., . . . Alfven, T. (2018). Partnerships for child health: capitalising on links between the sustainable development goals. BMJ. British Medical Journal, 360, Article ID k125.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Partnerships for child health: capitalising on links between the sustainable development goals
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2018 (English)In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 360, article id k125Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018
National Category
Other Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-222421 (URN)10.1136/bmj.k125 (DOI)000423711300001 ()29363500 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041308504 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180228

Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Weitz, N., Carlsen, H., Nilsson, M. & Skånberg, K. (2018). Towards systemic and contextual priority setting for implementing the 2030 Agenda. Sustainability Science, 13(2), 531-548
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards systemic and contextual priority setting for implementing the 2030 Agenda
2018 (English)In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 531-548Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How the sustainable development goals (SDGs) interact with each other has emerged as a key question in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, as it has potentially strong implications for prioritization of actions and their effectiveness. So far, analysis of interactions has been very basic, typically starting from one SDG, counting the number of interactions, and discussing synergies and trade-offs from the perspective of that issue area. This paper pushes the frontier of how interactions amongst SDG targets can be understood and taken into account in policy and planning. It presents an approach to assessing systemic and contextual interactions of SDG targets, using a typology for scoring interactions in a cross-impact matrix and using network analysis techniques to explore the data. By considering how a target interacts with another target and how that target in turn interacts with other targets, results provide a more robust basis for priority setting of SDG efforts. The analysis identifies which targets have the most and least positive influence on the network and thus guides, where efforts may be directed (and not); where strong positive and negative links sit, raising warning flags to areas requiring extra attention; and how targets that reinforce each others' progress cluster, suggesting where important cross-sectoral collaboration between actors is merited. How interactions play out is context specific and the approach is tested on the case of Sweden to illustrate how priority setting, with the objective to enhance progress across all 17 SDGs, might change if systemic impacts are taken into consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
2030 Agenda, Sustainable development goals (SDG), Systems analysis, Network analysis, Policy coherence
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-225074 (URN)10.1007/s11625-017-0470-0 (DOI)000426807800022 ()2-s2.0-85047651653 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencyMistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20180328

Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Weitz, N., Strambo, C., Kemp-Benedict, E. & Nilsson, M. (2017). Closing the governance gaps in the water-energy-food nexus: Insights from integrative governance. Global Environmental Change, 45, 165-173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Closing the governance gaps in the water-energy-food nexus: Insights from integrative governance
2017 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 45, p. 165-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The water-energy-food nexus has become a popular concept in environmental change research and policy debates. Proponents suggest that a nexus approach promotes policy coherence through identifying optimal policy mixes and governance arrangements across the water, energy and food sectors. Although the nexus literature identifies some barriers to achieving coherence it does not clearly explain why the barriers are present, what influences them, and how they can be acted upon. These gaps disconnect the nexus literature from the governance processes it ultimately seeks to influence. This paper examines how the integrative environmental governance literature can help to close these gaps. It extracts insights from seven streams of research literature and discusses their relevance for the nexus literature. We argue that connecting the nexus to decision-making processes requires: i) rethinking the boundaries of nexus analysis vis-à-vis other sectors and levels; ii) elaboration of shared principles that can guide decision-making towards policy coherence − or an appropriate form of fragmentation − in different contexts; iii) viewing policy coherence as a continuous process of changing values and perception rather than as an outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2017
Keywords
Environmental governance, Environmental policy integration, Integrative environmental governance, Nexus, Policy coherence, Water-energy-food nexus, decision making, energy flux, environmental change, environmental policy, environmental politics, food industry, governance approach, perception, policy approach, water economics
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-216315 (URN)10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2017.06.006 (DOI)000411912800014 ()2-s2.0-85021729906 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171204

Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, M. & Persson, Å. (2017). Policy note: Lessons from environmental policy integration for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. Environmental Science and Policy, 78, 36-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Policy note: Lessons from environmental policy integration for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda
2017 (English)In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 78, p. 36-39Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
economic development, environmental management, environmental policy, environmental protection, health care access, health education, high income country, human, priority journal, Review, sustainable development
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-218610 (URN)10.1016/j.envsci.2017.09.003 (DOI)000415909600005 ()2-s2.0-85029718567 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171130

Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, M., Griggs, D. & Visbeck, M. (2016). Erratum: Create a global microbiome effort (Nature (2015) 526 631-634)). Nature, 534(7607)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Erratum: Create a global microbiome effort (Nature (2015) 526 631-634))
2016 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 534, no 7607Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2016
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-197227 (URN)10.1038/534322a (DOI)2-s2.0-84975804377 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20161205

Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Tenggren, S., Wangel, J., Nilsson, M. & Nykvist, B. (2016). Transmission transitions: Barriers, drivers, and institutional governance implications of Nordic transmission grid development. Energy Research & Social Science, 19, 148-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transmission transitions: Barriers, drivers, and institutional governance implications of Nordic transmission grid development
2016 (English)In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 19, p. 148-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transmission grid development is key for the decarbonization of our energy systems, but has not been much addressed within the social sciences of energy studies. This paper addresses this gap and examines institutional barriers for developing the grid towards a decarbonized Nordic power system by 2050. The analysis focuses on current grid development practices from an institutional perspective to understand barriers and drivers to grid development for the case of Sweden. The results show that the transmission grid development regime is generally capable of implementing the grid investments needed to support a decarbonized Nordic power system, but that there are a few key barriers that need to be addressed. From this analysis we deduce possible governance options that could alleviate the barriers, enabling the development of the transmission grid that is needed for the Nordic power grid to become decarbonized by 2050.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Renewable, Decarbonization, Multilevel perspective, MLP, Nordic power systems, European integration, Governance
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192385 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2016.06.004 (DOI)000381640400016 ()2-s2.0-84976464993 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Note

QC 20160913

Available from: 2016-09-13 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Nykvist, B. & Nilsson, M. (2015). The EV paradox - A multilevel study of why Stockholm is not a leader in electric vehicles. Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, 14, 26-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The EV paradox - A multilevel study of why Stockholm is not a leader in electric vehicles
2015 (English)In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 14, p. 26-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite seemingly favourable conditions for alternative road-based transport technologies, progress on battery electric vehicles (BEVs) have been slow in Stockholm. We investigate why, applying the multilevel perspective for socio-technical transitions to a local case study of Stockholm. Using in-depth interviews with key actors we trace processes and discuss possible explanations at niche, regime and landscape levels. The results show that niche developments are clearly lacking, resulting in limited experience and knowledge of BEVs, and enduring conceptions among both policymakers and consumers. Regime actors are also ambivalent towards BEVs, leading to limited regime action with for example car companies moving more to Plugin Hybrid Electric Vehicles instead of BEVs. Finally, there is uncertainty as a result of a lack of strong policy signals for BEVs, in turn driven by policy makers' aversion against technology-specific support. We outline what governance gaps need to be addressed to induce faster progress on BEV uptake.

Keywords
Climate, Electrification, Socio-technical system, Sweden, Transport Vehicles
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-166943 (URN)10.1016/j.eist.2014.06.003 (DOI)2-s2.0-84923105031 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20150529

Available from: 2015-05-29 Created: 2015-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2157-1083

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