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Erlandsson, Martin
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Francart, N., Erlandsson, M., Malmqvist, T., Larsson, M. & Florell, J. (2019). Requirements set by Swedish municipalities to promote construction with low climate change impact. Journal of Cleaner Production, 208, 117-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Requirements set by Swedish municipalities to promote construction with low climate change impact
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 208, p. 117-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates how Swedish municipalities work to reduce the climate change impact of building construction. It focuses on current practices related to promoting the use of sustainable construction materials and on barriers to environmental requirements in construction, in particular environmental performance requirements based on LCA procedures. Municipalities were surveyed about the existence of municipal policies dealing with environmental issues in construction, the knowledge level about these issues, and the measures and requirements used to promote materials with low climate change impact. The survey was followed by semi-structured interviews about current practices and barriers to environmental requirements in construction. Results show that large municipalities are more likely to have dedicated policies and implement more measures than their smaller counterparts. However, willingness to implement future measures and knowledge of sustainable construction do not vary significantly with municipality population. Efforts are often limited to procurement, municipal construction projects and discussions with stakeholders. When requirements are set, they are almost always based on prescribing a technical solution (e.g. use of timber) rather than assessing environmental performance (e.g. calculating greenhouse gases emissions with a LCA tool). Measures that municipalities can take as public authorities are restricted by the law, which remains ambiguous as to the legality of environmental performance requirements. Legal issues, limited knowledge and resources appear to be the main barriers to environmental performance requirements in construction. A strategy is proposed to o​v​e​r​

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
LCA; life cycle assessment; livscykelanalys; municipality; kommun; construction; requirement; krav
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-244046 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.10.053 (DOI)000451362200011 ()2-s2.0-85056186787 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190218

Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved
Peñaloza, D., Erlandsson, M. & Pousette, A. (2018). Climate impacts from road bridges: effects of introducing concrete carbonation and biogenic carbon storage in wood. Structure and Infrastructure Engineering, 14(1), 56-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate impacts from road bridges: effects of introducing concrete carbonation and biogenic carbon storage in wood
2018 (English)In: Structure and Infrastructure Engineering, ISSN 1573-2479, E-ISSN 1744-8980, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 56-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The construction sector faces the challenge of mitigating climate change with urgency. Life cycle assessment(LCA), a widely used tool to assess the climate impacts of buildings, is seldom used for bridges. Materialspecificphenomena such as concrete carbonation and biogenic carbon storage are usually unaccountedfor when assessing the climate impacts from infrastructure. The purpose of this article is to explore theeffects these phenomena could have on climate impact assessment of road bridges and comparisonsbetween bridge designs. For this, a case study is used of two functionally equivalent design alternativesfor a small road bridge in Sweden. Dynamic LCA is used to calculate the effects of biogenic carbon storage,while the Lagerblad method and literature values are used to estimate concrete carbonation. The resultsshow that the climate impact of the bridge is influenced by both phenomena, and that the gap betweenthe impacts from both designs increases if the phenomena are accounted for. The outcome is influencedby the time occurrence assumed for the forest carbon uptake and the end-of-life scenario for the concrete.An equilibrium or 50/50 approach for accounting for the forest carbon uptake is proposed as a middlevalue compromise to handle this issue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Life cycles, wooden bridges, concrete bridges, environmental engineering, climate change, biogenic carbon storage, concrete carbonation
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Industrial Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207128 (URN)10.1080/15732479.2017.1327545 (DOI)000415674800005 ()2-s2.0-85019192178 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EnWoBio - Engineered Wood and Biobased Building Materials Laboratory
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-172
Note

QC 20170602

Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Arm, M., Wik, O., Engelsen, C. J., Erlandsson, M., Hjelmar, O. & Wahlström, M. (2017). How Does the European Recovery Target for Construction & Demolition Waste Affect Resource Management?. Paper presented at 9th International Conference on the Environmental and Technical Implications of Construction with Alternative Materials (WASCON) - Resource Efficiency in Construction, JUN 10-12, 2015, Santander, SPAIN. Waste and Biomass Valorization, 8(5), 1491-1504
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Does the European Recovery Target for Construction & Demolition Waste Affect Resource Management?
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2017 (English)In: Waste and Biomass Valorization, ISSN 1877-2641, E-ISSN 1877-265X, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 1491-1504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The revised EU Waste Framework Directive (WFD) includes a 70 % target for recovery of construction and demolition (C&D) waste. In order to study the potential change in the resource management of the main C&D waste fractions, as a consequence of fulfilling the WFD target, a Nordic project (ENCORT-CDW) has been performed. Waste fractions studied included asphalt, concrete, bricks, track ballast, gypsum-based construction materials and wood. Recovery scenarios were identified and estimations were made regarding expected savings of primary materials, impact on transport, and pollution and emissions. For wood waste, the main differences between re-use, material recycling and energy recovery were evaluated in a carbon footprint screening based on life cycle assessment methodology. The study concluded that the EU recovery target does not ensure a resource efficient and environmentally sustainable waste recovery in its present form since: It is very sensitive to how the legal definitions of waste and recovery are interpreted in the Member States. This means that certain construction material cycles might not count in the implementation reports while other, less efficient and environmentally safe, recovery processes of the same material will count. It is weight-based and consequently favours large and heavy waste streams. The result is that smaller flows with equal or larger resource efficiency and environmental benefit will be insignificant for reaching the target. It does not distinguish between the various recovery processes, meaning that resource efficient and environmentally safe recovery cannot be given priority. Improved knowledge on C&D waste generation and handling, as well as on content and emissions of dangerous substances, is required to achieve a sustainable recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2017
Keywords
Recovery, Construction & demolition waste, Life cycle assessment, Resource efficiency
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-212348 (URN)10.1007/s12649-016-9661-7 (DOI)000406399700011 ()2-s2.0-85001754637 (Scopus ID)
Conference
9th International Conference on the Environmental and Technical Implications of Construction with Alternative Materials (WASCON) - Resource Efficiency in Construction, JUN 10-12, 2015, Santander, SPAIN
Note

QC 20170821

Available from: 2017-08-21 Created: 2017-08-21 Last updated: 2017-08-25Bibliographically approved
Peñaloza, D., Erlandsson, M. & Falk, A. (2016). Exploring the climate impact effects of increased use of bio-based materials in buildings. Construction and Building Materials, 125, 219-226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the climate impact effects of increased use of bio-based materials in buildings
2016 (English)In: Construction and Building Materials, ISSN 0950-0618, E-ISSN 1879-0526, Vol. 125, p. 219-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whenever Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is used to assess the climate impact of buildings, those with high content of biobased materials result with the lowest impact. Traditional approaches to LCA fail to capture aspects such as biogenic carbon exchanges, their timing and the effects from carbon storage. This paper explores a prospective increase of biobased materials in Swedish buildings, using traditional and dynamic LCA to assess the climate impact effects of this increase. Three alternative designs are analysed; one without biobased material content, a CLT building and an alternative timber design with “increased bio”. Different scenario setups explore the sensitivity to key assumptions such as the building's service life, end-of-life scenario, setting of forest sequestration before (growth) or after (regrowth) harvesting and time horizon of the dynamic LCA. Results show that increasing the biobased material content in a building reduces its climate impact when biogenic sequestration and emissions are accounted for using traditional or dynamic LCA in all the scenarios explored. The extent of these reductions is significantly sensitive to the end-of-life scenario assumed, the timing of the forest growth or regrowth and the time horizon of the integrated global warming impact in a dynamic LCA. A time horizon longer than one hundred years is necessary if biogenic flows from forest carbon sequestration and the building's life cycle are accounted for. Further climate impact reductions can be obtained by keeping the biogenic carbon dioxide stored after end-of-life or by extending the building's service life, but the time horizon and impact allocation among different life cycles must be properly addressed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Biogenic carbon dioxide, Climate impact assessment, Dynamic LCA, Life Cycle Assessment, Wood construction, Buildings, Carbon dioxide, Ecodesign, Forestry, Global warming, Wooden construction, Alternative designs, Forest carbon sequestration, Global warming impact, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Traditional approaches, Life cycle
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-195234 (URN)10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2016.08.041 (DOI)000385600100022 ()2-s2.0-84982189595 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20161117

Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2017-06-26Bibliographically approved
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