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Karasev, Andrey
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Al-Saadi, M., Karasev, A., Jönsson, P. & Sandberg, F. (2018). Comparative Study of Microstructures Evolution of Columnar and Equiaxed Grain Structurs in Alloy 825 after Hot Compression. In: 3rd InternationalConference on Ingot Casting, Rolling and Forging, ICRF2018, in Stockholm, 16-19October: . Paper presented at 3rd International Conference on Ingot Casting, Rolling and Forging, ICRF2018, in Stockholm, 16-19 October. , Article ID 114.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative Study of Microstructures Evolution of Columnar and Equiaxed Grain Structurs in Alloy 825 after Hot Compression
2018 (English)In: 3rd InternationalConference on Ingot Casting, Rolling and Forging, ICRF2018, in Stockholm, 16-19October, 2018, article id 114Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235343 (URN)
Conference
3rd International Conference on Ingot Casting, Rolling and Forging, ICRF2018, in Stockholm, 16-19 October
Note

QCR 20181008

Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Al-Saadi, M., Jönsson, P., Sandberg, F., Karasev, A. & Jonsson, S. (2018). Microstructure characterisation in alloy 825. In: : . Paper presented at 17th International Conference on Metal Forming, Metal Forming 2018, 16-19 September 2018, Toyohashi, Japan (pp. 1626-1634). , 15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microstructure characterisation in alloy 825
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-234261 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.07.294 (DOI)
Conference
17th International Conference on Metal Forming, Metal Forming 2018, 16-19 September 2018, Toyohashi, Japan
Note

QC 20180906

Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Yoshioka, T., Ideguchi, T., Karasev, A., Ohba, Y. & Jönsson, P. G. (2018). The Effect of a High Al Content on the Variation of the Total Oxygen Content in the Steel Melt during a Secondary Refining Process. Steel Research International, 89(2), Article ID 1700287.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of a High Al Content on the Variation of the Total Oxygen Content in the Steel Melt during a Secondary Refining Process
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2018 (English)In: Steel Research International, ISSN 1611-3683, E-ISSN 1869-344X, Vol. 89, no 2, article id 1700287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to clarify the mechanism of low total oxygen (T.O) contents in high-Al containing steel grades. Steel samples are taken from a ladle during an LF-RH process, and the compositions of both the steels and inclusions are determined. According to thermodynamic considerations, the low T.O contents of high Al steel grades are due to the low insoluble oxygen contents. Due to the high Al contents in a steel melt, thermodynamic driving forces of the Al2O3 modification are lower than those in ordinary Al-killed steels. Both the low thermodynamic driving force of the Al2O3 modification and the inclusion removal from the melts contribute to the low CaO contents in inclusions in high-Al steel melts. The contact angles of inclusions in high Al steel melts are higher than 90 degrees due to the low CaO content in inclusions. Therefore, the removal tendency of inclusions in high Al steel melts is kept high throughout an LF-RH process. Due to this high removal tendency, the T.O contents in high Al steel melts decreases remarkably during an LF refining process. Thereafter, they decrease further during the following RH treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2018
Keywords
contact angle, high Al, inclusion evolution, inclusion removal, thermodynamics
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-223274 (URN)10.1002/srin.201700287 (DOI)000423833200011 ()2-s2.0-85028726650 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180216

Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Kellner, H. E. O., Karasev, A., Sundqvist, O., Memarpour, A. & Jönsson, P. (2017). Estimation of Non-Metallic Inclusions in Industrial Ni Based Alloys 825. Steel Research International, 88(4), Article ID UNSP 1600024.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimation of Non-Metallic Inclusions in Industrial Ni Based Alloys 825
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2017 (English)In: Steel Research International, ISSN 1611-3683, E-ISSN 1869-344X, Vol. 88, no 4, article id UNSP 1600024Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well known that inclusions affect the properties of the steel and other alloys. The importance of understanding the behavior of the inclusions during production can never be overstated. This study has examined the main types of big size (> 10 mu m) inclusions that exist in Ni-based Alloy at the end of ladle treatment and after casting during industrial production of Ni based Alloys 825. Sources, mechanisms of formation and behavior of different type large size inclusions in Alloy 825 are discussed based on 2 and 3D investigations of inclusion characteristics (such as, morphology, composition, size, and number) and thermodynamic considerations. The large size inclusions found can be divided in spherical (Type I and II) inclusions and in clusters (Type III-V). Type I-A inclusions (Al2O3-CaO-MgO) originate from the slag. Type I-B inclusions and Type II inclusions consist of CaO-Al2O3-MgO and Al2O3-TiO2-CaO, respectively. Both types originate from the FeTi70R alloy. Type III clusters (Al2O3-MgO-CaO) are formed during an Al deoxidation of the Ni-based alloy. Type IV clusters (Al2O3-TiO2-CaO) formed from small inclusions, which are precipitated in local zones which contain high Ti and Al levels. These clusters are transformed to Type III clusters over time in the ladle. Finally, Type V clusters are typical TiN clusters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2017
Keywords
Alloy 825, inclusion distribution, non-metallic inclusions
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-206287 (URN)10.1002/srin.201600024 (DOI)000398639200012 ()2-s2.0-85014553773 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170509

Available from: 2017-05-09 Created: 2017-05-09 Last updated: 2017-11-22Bibliographically approved
Nabeel, M., Karasev, A. & Jönsson, P. (2017). Friction Forces and Mechanical Dust Generation in an Iron Ore Pellet Bed Subjected to Varied Applied Loads. ISIJ International, 57(4), 656-664
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Friction Forces and Mechanical Dust Generation in an Iron Ore Pellet Bed Subjected to Varied Applied Loads
2017 (English)In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, E-ISSN 1347-5460, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 656-664Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Iron ore pellets degrade and generate dust during transportation and handling as well as during the iron making process. This leads to material losses and effects the process efficiency in a negative manner. In order, to reduce the generation of dust it is important to understand the influence of process parameters on the dust formation. An experimental setup was used to measure the dust generation and friction forces caused by abrasion of iron ore pellets in a closed pack bed. A varied load of 1 to 3 kg was applied on the pellet bed but at a constant air flow rate to capture the airborne dust particles. It was observed that an increase of similar to 67% is observed in the friction and the dust generation in the bed as the applied load increased from 1 to 3 kg. Moreover, the evaluation of the particle size distribution of the generated dust showed that a higher friction in the pellet bed can lead to an increased amount of airborne particles. Moreover, it has been shown that in an air flow the morphology and the orientation of dust particles can influence the air velocity required to transport the particles upwards.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IRON STEEL INST JAPAN KEIDANREN KAIKAN, 2017
Keywords
friction, dust generation, iron ore pellets, ironmaking, mechanical wear
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207919 (URN)10.2355/isijinternational.ISIJINT-2016-514 (DOI)000400319400010 ()2-s2.0-85018978440 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170530

Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Yoshioka, T., Shimamura, Y., Karasev, A., Ohba, Y. & Jönsson, P. (2017). Mechanism of a CaS Formation in an Al-Killed High-S Containing Steel during a Secondary Refining Process without a Ca-Treatment. Steel Research International, 88(10), Article ID UNSP 1700147.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanism of a CaS Formation in an Al-Killed High-S Containing Steel during a Secondary Refining Process without a Ca-Treatment
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2017 (English)In: Steel Research International, ISSN 1611-3683, E-ISSN 1869-344X, Vol. 88, no 10, article id UNSP 1700147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-216628 (URN)10.1002/srin.201700147 (DOI)000412176500012 ()2-s2.0-85026731076 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171102

Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Nabeel, M., Karasev, A., Jönsson, P. & Glaser, B.Characterization of dust generated during mechanical wear of partially reduced iron ore pellets.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of dust generated during mechanical wear of partially reduced iron ore pellets
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

During reduction in a blast furnace (BF), the iron ore pellets undergo structural changes which facilitate dust generation due to the mechanical wear / disintegration of the pellets. The generated dust decreases the permeability and productivity of the BF process. Thus, this study investigates the mechanical wear of iron ore pellets reduced at 500 °C (P500) and 850 °C (P850) and compares the results to the wear of unreduced pellets (P25). Moreover, the dust generated during the wear experiments is also characterized. It was found that pellets reduced at 500 °C exhibit a ~ 16 to 35% higher wear rate than reference unreduced pellets. For the pellets reduced at 850 °C, the mechanical wear is inhibited by a formation of a metallic layer at the outer surface of the pellets. Further, the dust generated due to mechanical wear of reduced pellets contained 3 to 6 times higher amount of coarse particles (>20µm) as compared to the dust from unreduced pellets. The obtained results are explained on the basis of the structural changes which take place during the reduction of pellets. 

Keywords
wear, pellets, dust, reduction, blast furnace
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Research subject
Materials Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-196927 (URN)
Note

QC 20161129

Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2016-11-25 Last updated: 2016-12-21Bibliographically approved
Svensson, J., Roos, E., Lagerstedt, A., Karasev, A., Brabie, V. & Jönsson, P.Experimental Study of non-metallic inclusions behaviour in the Tundish during Continuous Casting of Steel.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental Study of non-metallic inclusions behaviour in the Tundish during Continuous Casting of Steel
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The tundish has been experimentally mapped to study reactions between the molten steel and the cover powder as well as between the steel and the tundish lining. Steel samples were collected before casting, in the tundish during the casting process, and after casting. During sampling in the tundish the MISS sampler was used in order to make an in-depth study of two parallel positions of the steel/slag and steel/refractory interfaces. Thereafter, the samples were analysed with SEM in combination with EDS to determine the size and compositions of inclusions. The inclusion data were mapped in ternary phase diagrams to determine the origin of the inclusions. The results showed that two main inclusions groups, slag and deoxidation products, could be found in the samples. In addition, the samples contained inclusions that had been formed due to interactions with the refractory lining material. 

Keywords
tundish, clean steel, continuous casting, industrial plant trials, slag/steel interface, refractory/steel interface, non-metallic inclusions
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Research subject
Metallurgical process science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-202562 (URN)
Note

QC 20170228

Available from: 2017-02-27 Created: 2017-02-27 Last updated: 2017-02-28Bibliographically approved
Nabeel, M., Karasev, A. & Jönsson, P.Extreme Value Distribution of clusters in REM-alloyed stainless steels.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extreme Value Distribution of clusters in REM-alloyed stainless steels
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

An extreme value distribution (EVD) analysis has been applied for three dimensional (3D) investigations of clusters observed in REM alloyed stainless steel samples. The presence of observed unit areas without any clusters has been discussed. It has been shown that an increase of the observed unit area (AO) significantly improves the correlation of EVD regression lines. Moreover, three different size parameters were considered for EVD analysis. The results show that using the maximum length of clusters (LC) results in a better correlation of EVD regression lines by improving R2 value up to 0.9876 as compared to 0.9656 – 0.9774 for other size parameters. Moreover, a comparison of predicted and observed maximum lengths of clusters showed that there is need of further work on validation of EVD analysis. 

National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Research subject
Materials Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-196928 (URN)
Note

QC 20161129

Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2016-11-25 Last updated: 2016-12-20Bibliographically approved
Nabeel, M., Karasev, A. & Jönsson, P.Friction forces and mechanical dust generation in an iron ore pellet bed subjected to varied applied loads.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Friction forces and mechanical dust generation in an iron ore pellet bed subjected to varied applied loads
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Iron ore pellets degrade and generate dust during transportation and handling as well as during the iron making process. This leads to material losses and effects the process efficiency in a negative manner. In order, to reduce the generation of dust it is important to understand the influence of process parameters on the dust formation. An experimental setup was used to measure the dust generation and friction forces caused by abrasion of iron ore pellets in a closed pack bed. A varied load of 1 to 3 kg was applied on the pellet bed but at a constant air flow rate to capture the airborne dust particles. It was observed that an increase of ~67% is observed in the friction and the dust generation in the bed as the applied load increased from 1 to 3 kg. Moreover, the evaluation of the particle size distribution of the generated dust showed that a higher friction in the pellet bed can lead to an increased amount of airborne particles. Moreover, it has been shown that in an air flow the morphology and the orientation of dust particles can influence the air velocity required to transport the particles upwards.   

Keywords
friction, dust generation, iron ore pellets, ironmaking, mechanical wear
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Research subject
Materials Science and Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-196919 (URN)
Note

QC 20161129

Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2016-11-25 Last updated: 2016-12-20Bibliographically approved
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