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Möller, Niklas
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Erman, E. & Möller, N. (2018). Political Legitimacy for Our World: Where Is Political Realism Going?. Journal of Politics, 80(2), 525-538
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Political Legitimacy for Our World: Where Is Political Realism Going?
2018 (English)In: Journal of Politics, ISSN 0022-3816, E-ISSN 1468-2508, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 525-538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A common denominator of recent proposals suggested by political realists has been a rather pessimistic view of what we may rightfully demand of political authorities in terms of legitimacy. In our analysis, three main justificatory strategies are utilized by realists, each supposedly generating normative premises for this low bar conclusion. These strategies make use of the concept of politics, the constitutive features of politics, and feasibility constraints, respectively. In this article, we make three claims: first, that the two justificatory strategies of utilizing the concept of politics and the constitutive features of politics fail, since they rely on implausible normative premises; second, that while the feasibility strategy relies on reasonable premises, the low bar conclusion does not follow from them; third, that relativist premises fit better with the low bar conclusion, but that this also makes the realist position less attractive and casts doubt on several of its basic assumptions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UNIV CHICAGO PRESS, 2018
Keywords
political realism, political legitimacy, Matt Sleat, Enzo Rossi, John Horton
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228145 (URN)10.1086/694548 (DOI)000429247100021 ()
Note

QC 20180518

Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Erman, E. & Möller, N. (2018). The Interdependence of Risk and Moral Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, 21(2), 207-216
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Interdependence of Risk and Moral Theory
2018 (English)In: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, ISSN 1386-2820, E-ISSN 1572-8447, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 207-216Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228449 (URN)10.1007/s10677-018-9881-y (DOI)000431954300004 ()2-s2.0-85044394826 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180528

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, B. & Möller, N. (2017). Defining Information Security. Science and Engineering Ethics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defining Information Security
2017 (English)In: Science and Engineering Ethics, ISSN 1353-3452, E-ISSN 1471-5546Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article proposes a new definition of information security, the ‘Appropriate Access’ definition. Apart from providing the basic criteria for a definition—correct demarcation and meaning concerning the state of security—it also aims at being a definition suitable for any information security perspective. As such, it bridges the conceptual divide between so-called ‘soft issues’ of information security (those including, e.g., humans, organizations, culture, ethics, policies, and law) and more technical issues. Because of this it is also suitable for various analytical purposes, such as analysing possible security breaches, or for studying conflicting attitudes on security in an organization. The need for a new definition is demonstrated by pointing to a number of problems for the standard definition type of information security—the so-called CIA definition. Besides being too broad as well as too narrow, it cannot properly handle the soft issues of information security, nor recognize the contextual and normative nature of security.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Appropriate access; CIA definition; Defining information security; Ethical aspects on information security; Human aspects on information security; Information security
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-198672 (URN)10.1007/s11948-017-9992-1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85034044188 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency
Note

QC 20161220

Available from: 2017-01-17 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Erman, E. & Möller, N. (2016). Political legitimacy and the unreliability of language. Public Reason, 8(1-2), 81-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Political legitimacy and the unreliability of language
2016 (English)In: Public Reason, ISSN 2065-7285, E-ISSN 2065-8958, Vol. 8, no 1-2, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many political theorists in current debates have argued that pragmatist theories of mind and language place certain constraints on our normative political theories. In a couple of papers, we have accused these pragmatically influenced political theorists of misapplication of otherwise perfectly valid ideas. In a recent paper, one of the targets of our critique, Thomas Fossen, has retorted that we have misrepresented the role that a pragmatist theory of language plays in these accounts. In this paper, we claim that Fossen’s attempt to chisel out a role for his account in normative political theory rehearses the same problematic view of the utility of theories of language as his previous iterations. We argue that Fossen’s account is still guilty of the fallacious claim that a pragmatist theory of language (in his case Robert Brandom’s account) has implications for the form and justification of theories of political legitimacy. We specifically focus on three flaws with his current reply: the idea that criteria and conditions are problematic on a pragmatist outlook, the idea that a pragmatist linguistic account applied to a particular political context will have a distinct political-theoretical payoff, and the idea that a fundamental linguistic level of analysis supplies normative guidance for theorizing political legitimacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Bucharest, 2016
Keywords
Political legitimacy, Pragmatism, Robert Brandom, Theories of language
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-227899 (URN)2-s2.0-85042327695 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180516

Export Date: 14 May 2018; Article; Funding details: STINT, Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education; Funding text: Eva Erman wishes to thank the Swedish Research Council and Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation for the generous funding of her research.

Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved
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