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Tsaknaki, Vasiliki, PostDocORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2235-6078
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Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Marshall, J., Tennant, P., Li, C., Núñez-Pacheco, C., Garrett, R., Tsaknaki, V., . . . Benford, S. D. (2023). Collision Design. In: CHI EA '23: Extended Abstracts of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Paper presented at 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2023, Hamburg, Germany, Apr 23 2023 - Apr 28 2023. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 411.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collision Design
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2023 (English)In: CHI EA '23: Extended Abstracts of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2023, article id 411Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Collision, "the violent encounter of a moving body with another", is poorly understood in HCI. When we discuss people colliding with the physical artifacts we create, or colliding with each other while using our systems, this is primarily treated as a hazard, something which we should design to avoid. However many other human activities involve situations where deliberate exposure to risk of collision may in fact have positive aspects. In this paper we discuss how the ’risk matrix’, a widely used risk-management tool, which categorizes risks in terms of likelihood and severity, may limit interaction in unintended ways. We discuss reframings of this matrix in relation to design concepts of ’adventure’, ’disempowerment/agency’ and ’consent’. and show that a range of design spaces for collisions exist which may be fruitful to explore.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023
Keywords
collision, human-robot interaction, risk
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-329247 (URN)10.1145/3544549.3582734 (DOI)2-s2.0-85158106081 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2023, Hamburg, Germany, Apr 23 2023 - Apr 28 2023
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2019.0228
Note

QC 20230628

Available from: 2023-06-19 Created: 2023-06-19 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Tennent, P., Höök, K., Benford, S., Tsaknaki, V., Ståhl, A., Dauden Roquet, C., . . . Zhou, F. (2021). Articulating Soma Experiences using Trajectories. In: ACM Press (Ed.), CHI '21: Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’21), May 8–13, 2021, Yokohama, Japan. (pp. 1-16). New York: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Articulating Soma Experiences using Trajectories
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2021 (English)In: CHI '21: Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems / [ed] ACM Press, New York: ACM Press, 2021, p. 1-16Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we reflect on the applicability of the concept of trajectories to soma design. Soma design is a first-person design method which considers users’ subjective somatic or bodily experiences of a design. Due to bodily changes over time, soma experiences are inherently temporal. Current instruments for articulating soma experiences lack the power to express the effects of experiences on the body over time. To address this, we turn to trajectories, a well-known concept in the HCI community, as a way of mapping this aspect of soma experience. By showing trajectories through a range of dimensions, we can articulate individual experiences and differences in those experiences. Through analysis of a set of soma experience designs and a set of temporal dimensions within the experiences, this paper demonstrates how trajectories can provide a practical conceptual framing for articulating the temporal complexity of soma designs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2021
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Information and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-294582 (URN)10.1145/3411764.3445482 (DOI)2-s2.0-85106710030 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’21), May 8–13, 2021, Yokohama, Japan.
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RIT15-0046
Note

QC 20210610

Available from: 2021-05-18 Created: 2021-05-18 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Tsaknaki, V., Cotton, K., Karpashevich, P. & Sanches, P. (2021). “Feeling the Sensor Feeling you”: A Soma Design Exploration on Sensing Non-habitual Breathing. In: In Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '21): . Paper presented at CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '21). CHI '21: May 2021 (pp. 1-16). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 266.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Feeling the Sensor Feeling you”: A Soma Design Exploration on Sensing Non-habitual Breathing
2021 (English)In: In Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '21), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021, p. 1-16, article id 266Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Though seemingly straightforward and habitual, breathing is acomplex bodily function. Problematising the space of designing forbreathing as a non-habitual act pertaining to diferent bodies orsituations, we conducted a soma design exploration together with aclassical singer. Refecting on how sensors could capture the impactand somatic experience of being sensed led us to develop a newsensing mechanism using shape-change technologies integrated inthe Breathing Shell: a wearable that evokes a reciprocal experienceof “feeling the sensor feeling you” when breathing. We contributewith two design implications: 1) Enabling refections of the somaticimpact of being sensed in tandem with the type of data captured, 2)creating a tactile impact of the sensor data on the body. Both implications aim to deepen one’s understanding of how the whole somarelates to or with biosensors and ultimately leading to designingfor symbiotic experiences between biosensors and bodies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021
Keywords
sensing, actuation, soma design, autobiographical design, breathing, shape-change, non-habitual
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326937 (URN)10.1145/3411764.3445628 (DOI)2-s2.0-85106731372 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '21). CHI '21: May 2021
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 722022Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research, RIT15-0046
Note

QC 20230522

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-06-09Bibliographically approved
Alfaras, M., Tsaknaki, V., Sanches, P., Windlin, C., Umair, M., Sas, C. & Höök, K. (2020). From Biodata to Somadata. In: : . Paper presented at CHI ’20, April 25–30, 2020, Honolulu, HI, USA..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Biodata to Somadata
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2020 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Biosensing technologies are increasingly available as off-the-shelf products, yet for many designers, artists and non-engineers, these technologies remain difficult to design with. Through a soma design stance, we devised a novel approach for exploring qualities in biodata. Our explorative process culminated in the design of three artefacts, coupling biosignals to tangible actuation formats. By making biodata perceivable as sound, in tangible form or directly on the skin, it became possible to link qualities of the measurements to our own somatics - our felt experience of our bodily bioprocesses - as they dynamically unfold, spurring somatically-grounded design discoveries of novel possible interactions. We show that making biodata attainable for a felt experience - or as we frame it: turning biodata into somadata - enables not only first-person encounters, but also supports collaborative design processes as the somadata can be shared and experienced dynamically, right at the moment when we explore design ideas.

Keywords
biosensing, soma design, first-person perspective, affective technology, interaction design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-284010 (URN)10.1145/3313831.3376684 (DOI)000696109100153 ()2-s2.0-85090504393 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI ’20, April 25–30, 2020, Honolulu, HI, USA.
Projects
AffecTech: Personal Technologies for Affective Health, Innovative Training Net- work funded by the H2020 People Programme under Marie Skłodowska Curie grant agreement No 722022Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research project RIT15-0046Swedish Research council project 2016-04709
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 722022Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RIT15-0046Swedish Research Council, 2016-04709
Note

QC 20201021

Available from: 2020-10-13 Created: 2020-10-13 Last updated: 2023-05-10Bibliographically approved
Tsaknaki, V. (2020). Reflections on the value of imperfection in crafts through the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi. In: The Aesthetics of Imperfection in Music and the Arts: Spontaneity, Flaws and the Unfinished: (pp. 36-44). Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflections on the value of imperfection in crafts through the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi
2020 (English)In: The Aesthetics of Imperfection in Music and the Arts: Spontaneity, Flaws and the Unfinished, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc. , 2020, p. 36-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bloomsbury Publishing Plc., 2020
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-346422 (URN)2-s2.0-85191768992 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240521

Past of ISBN 978-135010606-2, 978-135010605-5

Available from: 2024-05-14 Created: 2024-05-14 Last updated: 2024-05-21Bibliographically approved
Tennent, P., Marshall, J., Tsaknaki, V., Windlin, C., Höök, K. & Alfaras, M. (2020). Soma Design and Sensory Misalignment. In: 2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2020: . Paper presented at CHI ’20, April 25–30, 2020, Honolulu, HI, USA.. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 3376812.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soma Design and Sensory Misalignment
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2020 (English)In: 2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2020, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2020, article id 3376812Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We report on a workshop bringing together researchers working in soma design and sensory misalignment. Creating experiences that make use of sensory misalignment has become increasingly common, often associated with virtual reality research. However, little attention has been paid to how to design such experiences. We argue that the practice of soma design is a relevant candidate method for designing misalignment experiences, since soma design brings with it concepts such as estrangement and disrupting the habitual as a path to design. We further argue that sensory misalignment may in turn extend soma design methods, adding methods for explicitly disrupting sensory perception using technology interventions. Finally, we draw on the findings of that workshop to discuss the ideas of: pluralism in experience; orchestration of overall experience; as well as the broader intersection of soma design and sensory misalignment approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020
Keywords
Soma design, Sensory Misalignment, Bodily Sensation
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-284018 (URN)10.1145/3313831.3376812 (DOI)000696110400101 ()2-s2.0-85091302386 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI ’20, April 25–30, 2020, Honolulu, HI, USA.
Projects
AffecTech: Personal Technologies for Affective Health, InnovativTraininge Net- work funded by the H2020 People Programme under Marie Sklodowska Curie grant agreement No 722022Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research project RIT15-0046Swedish Research council project 2016-04709UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council grants: Living with Digital Ubiquity - EP/M000877/1My Life in Data - EP/L015463/1
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 722022Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RIT15-0046Swedish Research Council, 2016-04709
Note

QC 20201020

Available from: 2020-10-13 Created: 2020-10-13 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Avila, J. M., Tsaknaki, V., Karpashevich, P., Windlin, C., Valenti, N., Höök, K., . . . Benford, S. (2020). Soma design for nime. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression: . Paper presented at 20th International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, NIME 2020, 21 July 2020 through 25 July 2020 (pp. 489-494). International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression
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2020 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression , 2020, p. 489-494Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Previous research on musical embodiment has reported that expert performers often regard their instruments as an extension of their body. Not every digital musical instrument seeks to create a close relationship between body and instrument, but even for the many that do, the design process often focuses heavily on technical and sonic factors, with relatively less attention to the bodily experience of the performer. In this paper we propose soma design as an alternative approach to explore this space. Soma method aims to attune the sensibilities of designers, as well as their experience of their body, and make use of these notions as a resource for creative aesthetic design. We report on a series of workshops exploring the relationship between the body and the guitar with a soma design approach. The workshops resulted in a series of guitar-related artefacts and NIMEs that emerged from the somatic exploration of balance and tension during guitar performance. Lastly we present lessons learned from our research that could inform future Soma-based musical instrument design, and how NIME research may also inform soma design. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, 2020
Keywords
Augmented guitar, Bodily experience, Breath control, Soma design, Design, Music, Aesthetics designs, Creatives, Design approaches, Design-process, Musical instrument design, Performance, Musical instruments
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-325324 (URN)2-s2.0-85133574184 (Scopus ID)
Conference
20th International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, NIME 2020, 21 July 2020 through 25 July 2020
Note

QC 20230404

Available from: 2023-04-04 Created: 2023-04-04 Last updated: 2023-04-04Bibliographically approved
Sanches, P., Tsaknaki, V., Rostami, A. & Brown, B. (2020). Under Surveillance: Technology Practices of those Monitored by the State. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings: . Paper presented at CHI '20, 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing SystemsApril 2020. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Under Surveillance: Technology Practices of those Monitored by the State
2020 (English)In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2020Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper documents the experiences of those living under state surveillance. We interviewed our participants about how they lived under threat, and how it changed their technology practices. Our participants spanned three groups - journalists who reported from countries where their activities were illegal; activists who took part in civil disobedience, and individuals who worked in illegal activities that would have likely led to prosecution. In our analysis we cover four themes: first, 'the imagined surveillant'. Second, the danger and dependencies of technology use, third, their coping strategies, and lastly how belonging to a group can protect but also expose. In our discussion we cover how we can design for dissidents, and how to deal with the difficult questions this raises. We conclude by advocating for research that takes into account a critical view of the state in HCI and more broadly for an anti-surveillance stance in the design of technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020
Keywords
dissidents, state, surveillance, Crime, Human engineering, Can design, Coping strategies, Illegal activities, Paper documents, Technology use, Monitoring
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-301716 (URN)10.1145/3313831.3376889 (DOI)000696110400178 ()2-s2.0-85091280998 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI '20, 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing SystemsApril 2020
Note

QC 20210913

Available from: 2021-09-13 Created: 2021-09-13 Last updated: 2023-04-05Bibliographically approved
Tsaknaki, V. & Elblaus, L. (2019). A wearable nebula material investigations of implicit interaction. In: TEI 2019 - Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction: . Paper presented at 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2019, 17 March 2019 through 20 March 2019 (pp. 625-633). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A wearable nebula material investigations of implicit interaction
2019 (English)In: TEI 2019 - Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2019, p. 625-633Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present the Nebula, a garment that translates intentional gestures and implicit interaction into sound. Nebula is a studded cloak made from a heavy fabric that envelopes the wearer with pendulous folds and has strong experiential qualities that were especially appreciated by performing artists. We describe the design process in detail, and highlight three material investigations that show material connections that were fundamental to the experience of the garment: How the draping and construction of the garment allowed for implicit interaction, how the studs were used both as a computational sensing material and a strong visual component, and how the sound design exploited tangible material qualities in the garment. We offer these three material investigations as contributions and discuss how material investigations more broadly can produce evocative connections in the materials available in design work, but also as a way to extract legible design intentions for other designers and researchers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2019
Keywords
Crafting, Implicit Interaction, Materials, Sound and Music Computing, Wearable technology, Design intention, Experiential qualities, Material quality, Sensing material, Visual components
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252214 (URN)10.1145/3294109.3295623 (DOI)000472795300079 ()2-s2.0-85063908332 (Scopus ID)9781450361965 (ISBN)
Conference
13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2019, 17 March 2019 through 20 March 2019
Note

QC 20190611

Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Windlin, C., Ståhl, A., Sanches, P., Tsaknaki, V., Karpashevich, P., Balaam, M. & Höök, K. (2019). Soma Bits - Mediating Technology to Orchestrate Bodily Experiences. In: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference19–22/03/2019: . Paper presented at RTD 2019 - Research through Design Conference 2019, the Science Centre, Delft, on 19th to 22nd March 2019..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soma Bits - Mediating Technology to Orchestrate Bodily Experiences
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference19–22/03/2019, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Soma Bits are a prototyping toolkit that facilitates Soma Design. Acting as an accessible ‘sociodigital material’ Soma Bits allow designers to pair digital technologies, with their whole body and senses, as part of an iterative soma design process.The Soma Bits addresses the difficulty we experienced in past Soma Design processes — that articulating ofsensations we want to evoke to others, and thenmaintaining these experiences in memory throughout a design process. Thus, the Soma Bits enable designers to know and experience what a designmight ‘feel like’ and to share that with others.

The Soma Bits relate to three experiential qualities:‘feeling connected’, ‘feeling embraced’, and ‘being in correspondence’ with the interactive materials. The Soma Bits have a form factor and materiality thatallow actuators (heat, vibration, and shape-changing) to be placed on and around the body; they are easily configurable to enable quick and controllable creations of soma experiences which can be both part of a first-person approach as well as shared withothers. The Soma Bits are a living, growing library ofshapes and actuators. We use them in our own designpractices, as well as when engaging others in soma design processes.

Keywords
Somaesthetic Interaction Design, Design Process
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253818 (URN)10.6084/m9.figshare.7855799.v2 (DOI)
Conference
RTD 2019 - Research through Design Conference 2019, the Science Centre, Delft, on 19th to 22nd March 2019.
Projects
Affective Health, Innova- tive Training Network funded by the H2020 People Programme under Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 722022
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RIT15-0046
Note

QC 20190619

Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2023-05-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2235-6078

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