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Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Eneh, L., Fillinger, U., Borg-Karlson, A.-K., Rajarao, G. K. & Lindh, J. (2019). Anopheles arabiensis oviposition site selection in response to habitat persistence and associated physicochemical parameters, bacteria and volatile profiles. Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 33(1), 56-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anopheles arabiensis oviposition site selection in response to habitat persistence and associated physicochemical parameters, bacteria and volatile profiles
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2019 (English)In: Medical and Veterinary Entomology, ISSN 0269-283X, E-ISSN 1365-2915, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 56-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A better understanding of the oviposition behaviour of malaria vectors might facilitate the development of new vector control tools. However, the factors that guide the aquatic habitat selection of gravid females are poorly understood. The present study explored the relative attractiveness of similar artificial ponds (0.8 m(2)) aged at varying lengths prior to opening in such a way that wild Anopheles arabiensis could choose between ponds that were freshly set up, or were aged 4 or 17 days old, to lay eggs. Physicochemical parameters, bacterial profile and volatile organic compounds emitted from ponds were investigated over three experimental rounds. Fresh ponds contained on average twice as many An. arabiensis instar larvae (mean 50, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 29-85) as the ponds that had aged 4 days (mean = 24, 95% CI = 14-42) and 17 days (mean = 20, 95% CI: 12-34). Fresh ponds were associated with a significantly higher turbidity combined with higher water temperature, higher nitrite levels and a lower pH and chlorophyll level than the older ponds. Round by round analyses suggested that bacteria communities differed between age groups and also that 4-heptanone, 2-ethylhexanal and an isomer of octenal were exclusively detected from the fresh ponds. These characteristics may be useful with respect to developing attract and kill strategies for malaria vector control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
Malaria, oviposition, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, volatile compounds, physicochemical parameter
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-244502 (URN)10.1111/mve.12336 (DOI)000457739700005 ()30168151 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052815471 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190328

Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, M., Zhao, T. & Borg-Karlson, A.-K. (2019). Arthropod infestation sites and induced defence can be traced by emission from single spruce needles. Arthropod-Plant Interactions, 13(2), 253-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arthropod infestation sites and induced defence can be traced by emission from single spruce needles
2019 (English)In: Arthropod-Plant Interactions, ISSN 1872-8855, E-ISSN 1872-8847, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Emissions of defence chemicals from Norway spruce seedlings can be induced by feeding arthropods or by exogenous hormonal application. Some defence chemicals may attract or repel associated arthropods. The aim of this study was to show that it is possible to detect and collect stress-induced volatiles from micro sites, such as at the scale of a single needle, in vivo by using SPME. Methyl jasmonate application on the stem of Norway spruce seedlings induced emission of (E)-beta-farnesene only from the needles closest to the application site. Emissions of (E)-beta-farnesene, (E,E)-alpha-farnesene and (E)-alpha-bisabolene were only detected from needles infested by the spider mite Oligonychus ununguis. The total volatile amount detected by SPME-GC-MS reached a considerable mass of 14 ng/needle/24 h, suggesting that emission from damaged and stressed conifers might have a larger impact on the macro climate than previously estimated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2019
Keywords
(E)-beta-Farnesene, Methyl jasmonate, Picea abies, Solid-phase microextraction (SPME), Stress-induced volatiles, Oligonychus ununguis
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-251334 (URN)10.1007/s11829-019-09677-0 (DOI)000464759300010 ()2-s2.0-85061640688 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190523

Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
Zhao, T., Ganji, S., Schiebe, C., Bohman, B., Weinstein, P., Krokene, P., . . . Unelius, C. R. (2019). Convergent evolution of semiochemicals across Kingdoms: bark beetles and their fungal symbionts. The ISME Journal, 13(6), 1535-1545
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Convergent evolution of semiochemicals across Kingdoms: bark beetles and their fungal symbionts
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2019 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1535-1545Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Convergent evolution of semiochemical use in organisms from different Kingdoms is a rarely described phenomenon. Tree-killing bark beetles vector numerous symbiotic blue-stain fungi that help the beetles colonize healthy trees. Here we show for the first time that some of these fungi are able to biosynthesize bicyclic ketals that are pheromones and other semiochemicals of bark beetles. Volatile emissions of five common bark beetle symbionts were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. When grown on fresh Norway spruce bark the fungi emitted three well-known bark beetle aggregation pheromones and semiochemicals (exo-brevicomin, endo-brevicomin and trans-conophthorin) and two structurally related semiochemical candidates (exo-1,3-dimethyl-2,9-dioxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane and endo-1,3-dimethyl-2,9-dioxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane) that elicited electroantennogram responses in the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. When grown on malt agar with C-13 D-Glucose, the fungus Grosmannia europhioides incorporated C-13 into exo-brevicomin and trans-conophthorin. The enantiomeric compositions of the fungus-produced ketals closely matched those previously reported from bark beetles. The production of structurally complex bark beetle pheromones by symbiotic fungi indicates cross-kingdom convergent evolution of signal use in this system. This signaling is susceptible to disruption, providing potential new targets for pest control in conifer forests and plantations.

National Category
Agricultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252966 (URN)10.1038/s41396-019-0370-7 (DOI)000468529400012 ()30770902 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061750036 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190812

Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
López-Goldar, X., Villari, C., Bonello, P., Borg-Karlson, A.-K., Grivet, D., Sampedro, L. & Zas, R. (2019). Genetic variation in the constitutive defensive metabolome and its inducibility are geographically structured and largely determined by demographic processes in maritime pine. Journal of Ecology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic variation in the constitutive defensive metabolome and its inducibility are geographically structured and largely determined by demographic processes in maritime pine
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Interspecific phenotypic variation in plant secondary metabolites (PSM) is often explained by biotic and abiotic factors. However, patterns of variation within species do not clearly fit the theoretical predictions. Exploring how genetics, environment and demographic processes shape such variation among and within populations is crucial for understanding evolution of PSM, particularly in long-lived plants such as forest trees. Here, we quantified genetic variation in PSM among and within populations, and explored drivers of local adaptation by studying the role of climate as a source of population differentiation in PSM of maritime pine. Constitutive profile and concentrations of 63 PSM and their herbivory-associated inducibility were determined in the bark of 130 clonally replicated genotypes with known familial structure from 10 populations covering the distribution range of the species. We compared neutral and quantitative population genetic differentiation of PSM (F ST and Q ST ). Also, we accounted for population genetic structure and kinship among individuals when exploring climate–trait relationships. We found large population differentiation and additive genetic variation in constitutive PSM. Many PSM were inducible, although very low genetic variation was observed with respect to their inducibility. Q ST –F ST comparisons suggest that differentiation of most diterpenes, monoterpenes, and phenolics can be explained by neutral demographic processes. Spatially heterogeneous selection across populations leading to local adaptation was only found for total constitutive sesquiterpenes and a few individual PSM. After accounting for population genetic structure, only the constitutive concentration of two sesquiterpenes showing signs of diversifying selection was predicted by climate, with decreasing concentrations along a growth-prone climatic gradient. Synthesis. Evolutionary patterns of plant secondary metabolites depended on their chemical nature, with neutral differentiation governing most plant secondary metabolites. Evidence of local adaptation was only found for total constitutive sesquiterpenes and a few individual plant secondary metabolites. The low genetic variation in the inducibility of plant secondary metabolites suggests a conserved model of defensive induction in this species. Since population differentiation linked to past demographic history could lead to false positives of adaptive differentiation signals, accounting for the genetic relatedness among populations is required to infer the environmental determinants of intraspecific genetic variation in putatively adaptive traits such as plant defences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2019
Keywords
environmental gradients, F ST, genetic variation, geographic structure, inducibility, Pinus pinaster, plant secondary metabolites, Q ST
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252240 (URN)10.1111/1365-2745.13159 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063592663 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC20190614

Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Azeem, M., Barba Aliaga, M., Borg-Karlson, A.-K., Terenius, O., Broberg, A. & Rajarao, G. K. (2019). Heterobasidion-growth inhibiting Bacillus subtilis A18 exhibits medium- and age-dependent production of lipopeptides. Microbiology Research, 223-225, 129-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heterobasidion-growth inhibiting Bacillus subtilis A18 exhibits medium- and age-dependent production of lipopeptides
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2019 (English)In: Microbiology Research, ISSN 0944-5013, E-ISSN 1618-0623, Vol. 223-225, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Heterobasidion annosum s.s. and H. parviporum are severe pathogens of conifers causing butt rot and root rot thus reducing the economic value of timber. Here, the antifungal activity of Bacillus subtilis isolate A18 against these two Heterobasidion species was investigated. Five different culture media with different culture age were investigated to study the effect of substrate composition and culture age for metabolite production. Bacterial cultures and cell-free culture filtrates were tested for antifungal activity. Inhibition of fungal growth was analysed using the agar disc-diffusion method. MALDI-TOF and LC-HRMS analyses were used to identify the antifungal metabolites. Substrate composition and age of culture were found to be active variables with direct effect on the antifungal activity of bacterial culture extracts. High anti-fungal activity was observed when B. subtilis was cultured in PDB, SGB and LB media for four days. Mass-spectrometry analysis showed the presence of lipopeptides in culture filtrates identified as members of the surfactins, polymixins, kurstakins and fengycins. A culture filtrate containing fengycin-type lipopeptides showed the highest bioactivity against Heterobasidion species. Bacterial cultures had higher bioactivity compared to their respective cell free culture filtrates. The results of the present study suggest that B. subtilis A18 is a powerful biocontrol agent against Heterobasidion infections of tree wounds and stumps.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier GmbH, 2019
Keywords
Anti-fungal compounds, Biocontrol, Co-culturing, Conifers, Inhibition, Lipopeptides, Bacteria, Bacteriology, Enzyme inhibition, Forestry, Mass spectrometry, Metabolites, Substrates, Antifungal compounds, Antifungal metabolite, Heterobasidion annosum, Mass spectrometry analysis, Metabolite production, Substrate composition, Fungi, Bacillus subtilis, Bacteria (microorganisms), Coniferophyta, Heterobasidion, Heterobasidion parviporum
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252448 (URN)10.1016/j.micres.2019.04.006 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065092748 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190715

Available from: 2019-07-15 Created: 2019-07-15 Last updated: 2019-07-15Bibliographically approved
Elmhalli, F., Garboui, S. S., Borg-Karlson, A.-K., Mozuraitis, R., Baldauf, S. L. & Grandi, G. (2019). The repellency and toxicity effects of essential oils from the Libyan plants Salvadora persica and Rosmarinus officinalis against nymphs of Ixodes ricinus. Experimental & applied acarology, 77(4), 585-599
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The repellency and toxicity effects of essential oils from the Libyan plants Salvadora persica and Rosmarinus officinalis against nymphs of Ixodes ricinus
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2019 (English)In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 585-599Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Essential oils extracted from the leaves of Libyan Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), and Miswak (Salvadora persica L.) were evaluated for their acaricidal and repellent effects on Ixodes ricinus L. nymphs (Acari: Ixodidae) using a bioassay based on an open filter paper method'. Rosmarinus officinalis leaf essential oil diluted to 0.5 and 1 mu l/cm(2) in acetone exhibited, respectively, 20 and 100% tick mortality after about 5h of exposure. A total of 50 and 95% of I. ricinus nymphs were killed by direct contact with the oil when exposed to lethal concentrations (LC)of 0.7 mu l/cm(2) (LC50) and 0.95 mu l/cm(2) (LC95), respectively. The LC50 (0.5 mu l/cm(2)) was reached before the end of the first 24h of exposure time (ET), as tick mortality at 24h was 60%. Salvadora persica leaf essential oil at 1 mu l/cm(2) showed a significant repellency effect against I. ricinus nymphs at 1.5h ET. A 95% repellency was observed at a repellent concentration (RC95) of 1 mu l/cm(2) of S. persica, but no significant mortality was recorded at this dose of S. persica oil. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses showed that the main monoterpenes in both oils were 1,8-cineol, -pinene, and -pinene, although in markedly different proportions. These results suggest that essential oils have substantial potential as alternative approaches for I. ricinus tick control.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252993 (URN)10.1007/s10493-019-00373-5 (DOI)000468592300010 ()31089978 (PubMedID)
Note

QC 20190729

Available from: 2019-07-29 Created: 2019-07-29 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
Lundborg, L., Sampedro, L., Borg-Karlson, A.-K. & Zas, R. (2018). Effects of methyl jasmonate on the concentration of volatile terpenes in tissues of Maritime pine and Monterey pine and its relation to pine weevil feeding. Trees
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of methyl jasmonate on the concentration of volatile terpenes in tissues of Maritime pine and Monterey pine and its relation to pine weevil feeding
2018 (English)In: Trees, ISSN 0931-1890, E-ISSN 1432-2285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics Organic Chemistry Analytical Chemistry Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235793 (URN)10.1007/s00468-018-1757-1 (DOI)000457471000005 ()2-s2.0-85052969750 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RBb08-0003
Note

QC 20181009

Available from: 2018-10-04 Created: 2018-10-04 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Lopez-Goldar, X., Villari, C., Bonello, P., Borg-Karlson, A.-K., Grivet, D., Zas, R. & Sampedro, L. (2018). Inducibility of Plant Secondary Metabolites in the Stem Predicts Genetic Variation in Resistance Against a Key Insect Herbivore in Maritime Pine. Frontiers in Plant Science, 9, Article ID 1651.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inducibility of Plant Secondary Metabolites in the Stem Predicts Genetic Variation in Resistance Against a Key Insect Herbivore in Maritime Pine
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 9, article id 1651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Resistance to herbivores and pathogens is considered a key plant trait with strong adaptive value in trees, usually involving high concentrations of a diverse array of plant secondary metabolites (PSM). Intraspecific genetic variation and plasticity of PSM are widely known. However, their ecology and evolution are unclear, and even the implication of PSM as traits that provide direct effective resistance against herbivores is currently questioned. We used control and methyl jasmonate (MJ) induced clonal copies of genotypes within families from ten populations of the main distribution range of maritime pine to exhaustively characterize the constitutive and induced profile and concentration of PSM in the stem phloem, and to measure insect herbivory damage as a proxy of resistance. Then, we explored whether genetic variation in resistance to herbivory may be predicted by the constitutive concentration of PSM, and the role of its inducibility to predict the increase in resistance once the plant is induced. We found large and structured genetic variation among populations but not between families within populations in resistance to herbivory. The MJ-induction treatment strongly increased resistance to the weevil in the species, and the genetic variation in the inducibility of resistance was significantly structured among populations, with greater inducibility in the Atlantic populations. Genetic variation in resistance was largely explained by the multivariate concentration and profile of PSM at the genotypic level, rather than by bivariate correlations with individual PSM, after accounting for genetic relatedness among genotypes. While the constitutive concentration of the PSM blend did not show a clear pattern of resistance to herbivory, specific changes in the chemical profile and the increase in concentration of the PSM blend after MJ induction were related to increased resistance. To date, this is the first example of a comprehensive and rigorous approach in which inducibility of PSM in trees and its implication in resistance was analyzed excluding spurious associations due to genetic relatedness, often overlooked in intraspecific studies. Here we provide evidences that multivariate analyses of PSM, rather than bivariate correlations, provide more realistic information about the potentially causal relationships between PSM and resistance to herbivory in pine trees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2018
Keywords
genetic variation, herbivory, inducibility, maritime pine, plant secondary metabolites (PSM), phenol resistance, terpenes
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239760 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2018.01651 (DOI)000450779400001 ()2-s2.0-85058803840 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190109

Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, K., Konstanzer, V., Rajarao, G. K., Terenius, O., Seriot, L., Nordenhem, H., . . . Borg-Karlson, A.-K. (2017). Antifeedants Produced by Bacteria Associated with the Gut of the Pine Weevil Hylobius abietis. Microbial Ecology, 74(1), 177-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antifeedants Produced by Bacteria Associated with the Gut of the Pine Weevil Hylobius abietis
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2017 (English)In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The pine weevil, Hylobius abietis, is a severe forest pest insect as it feeds on newly planted conifer seedlings. To identify and develop an antifeedant could be one step towards the protection of seedlings from feeding damage by the pine weevil. With the aim to trace the origin of the antifeedants previously found in feces of the pine weevil, we investigated the culturable bacteria associated with the gut and identified the volatiles they produced. Bacterial isolates were identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis. The volatile emissions of selected bacteria, cultivated on NB media or on the grated phloem of Scots pine twigs dispersed in water, were collected and analyzed by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The bacterial isolates released a variety of compounds, among others 2-methoxyphenol, 2-phenylethanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide. A strong antifeedant effect was observed by 2-phenylethanol, which could thus be a good candidate for use to protect planted conifer seedlings against feeding damage caused by H. abietis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2017
Keywords
Hylobius abietis, Rahnella, Brevundimonas, 2-Methoxyphenol, 2-Phenylethanol, Antifeedant
National Category
Water Treatment Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-210344 (URN)10.1007/s00248-016-0915-5 (DOI)000403255500017 ()2-s2.0-85009191802 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170704

Available from: 2017-07-04 Created: 2017-07-04 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved
Mozuraitis, R., Kutra, J., Borg-Karlson, A.-K. & Buda, V. (2017). Dynamics of putative sex pheromone components during heat periods in estrus-induced cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 100(9), 7686-7695
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamics of putative sex pheromone components during heat periods in estrus-induced cows
2017 (English)In: Journal of Dairy Science, ISSN 0022-0302, E-ISSN 1525-3198, Vol. 100, no 9, p. 7686-7695Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Determination of the optimal insemination time in dairy cows is vital for fertilization success and is a challenging task due to silent or weak signs of estrus shown by some cows. This can be overcome by combining several estrus detection methods, leading to higher detection rates. However, an efficient, noninvasive method for detecting estrus in cows is still needed. Chemical cues released by the cow during estrus have been proposed to have pheromonal properties and signal readiness to mate to the bull. Such cues could be used in an industrial setting to detect cows in estrus. However, no conclusive published data show temporal changes in putative sex pheromone levels during estrus. The goal of this study was to determine the temporal pattern of putative sex pheromone components during estrus and to assess the reproducibility of changes in pheromone concentration with respect to ovulation time. Two injections of the hormone PGF(2 alpha) were administered over a 2-wk interval to induce and synchronize the estrous cycles of 6 Holstein cows. The precise time of ovulation was determined by means of an ultrasound technique, and estrus was determined by visual observation. Using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, we showed that acetic and propionic acids, which have been proposed to be putative sex pheromone components in cows, were present in the headspaces of all estrous and diestrous fecal samples, whereas 1-iodoundecane was not detected by solid-phase microextraction or by solvent extraction with diethyl ether. Low levels of acids were observed until 1 d before ovulation, at which point their concentrations increased, peaking around 0.5 d before ovulation. The application of labeled synthetic standards revealed that during the peak of release, 36 +/- 8 ng (average +/- SD) of acetic acid and 10 +/- 3 ng of propionic acid were present in 0.5-g samples of estrous-phase fecal matter compared with 19 +/- 5 and 2.3 +/- 1 ng of acetic and propionic acids, respectively, in the control diestrous samples. After the peak, the amounts of the compounds decreased sharply to match those of the control samples and afterward returned to the baseline readings. This decrease in the amounts of putative pheromone components was registered about 12 h before ovulation, indicating that acetic and propionic acids could be used as biomarkers for the electronic detection of ovulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214485 (URN)10.3168/jds.2016-12376 (DOI)000407528900071 ()28668525 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021312750 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171009

Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
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