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Bagherbandi, Mohammad
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Amin, H., Sjöberg, L. & Bagherbandi, M. (2019). A global vertical datum defined by the conventional geoid potential and the Earth ellipsoid parameters. Journal of Geodesy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A global vertical datum defined by the conventional geoid potential and the Earth ellipsoid parameters
2019 (English)In: Journal of Geodesy, ISSN 0949-7714, E-ISSN 1432-1394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The geoid, according to the classical Gauss–Listing definition, is, among infinite equipotential surfaces of the Earth’s gravity field, the equipotential surface that in a least squares sense best fits the undisturbed mean sea level. This equipotential surface, except for its zero-degree harmonic, can be characterized using the Earth’s global gravity models (GGM). Although, nowadays, satellite altimetry technique provides the absolute geoid height over oceans that can be used to calibrate the unknown zero-degree harmonic of the gravimetric geoid models, this technique cannot be utilized to estimate the geometric parameters of the mean Earth ellipsoid (MEE). The main objective of this study is to perform a joint estimation of W0, which defines the zero datum of vertical coordinates, and the MEE parameters relying on a new approach and on the newest gravity field, mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models. As our approach utilizes both satellite altimetry observations and a GGM model, we consider different aspects of the input data to evaluate the sensitivity of our estimations to the input data. Unlike previous studies, our results show that it is not sufficient to use only the satellite-component of a quasi-stationary GGM to estimate W0. In addition, our results confirm a high sensitivity of the applied approach to the altimetry-based geoid heights, i.e., mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models. Moreover, as W0 should be considered a quasi-stationary parameter, we quantify the effect of time-dependent Earth’s gravity field changes as well as the time-dependent sea level changes on the estimation of W0. Our computations resulted in the geoid potential W0 = 62636848.102 ± 0.004 m2 s−2 and the semi-major and minor axes of the MEE, a = 6378137.678 ± 0.0003 m and b = 6356752.964 ± 0.0005 m, which are 0.678 and 0.650 m larger than those axes of GRS80 reference ellipsoid, respectively. Moreover, a new estimation for the geocentric gravitational constant was obtained as GM = (398600460.55 ± 0.03) × 106 m3 s−2.

National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259629 (URN)
Note

QC 20190930

Available from: 2019-09-19 Created: 2019-09-19 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Gido, N. A. A., Bagherbandi, M. & Sjöberg, L. E. (2019). A gravimetric method to determine horizontal stress field due to flow in the mantle in Fennoscandia. GEOSCIENCES JOURNAL, 23(3), 377-389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A gravimetric method to determine horizontal stress field due to flow in the mantle in Fennoscandia
2019 (English)In: GEOSCIENCES JOURNAL, ISSN 1226-4806, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 377-389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mass changes and flow in the Earth's mantle causes the Earth's crust not only to move vertically, but also horizontally and to tilt, and produce a major stress in the lithosphere. Here we use a gravimetric approach to model sub-lithosphere horizontal stress in the Earth's mantle and its temporal changes caused by geodynamical movements like mantle convection in Fennoscandia. The flow in the mantle is inferred from tectonics and convection currents carrying heat from the interior of the Earth to the crust. The result is useful in studying how changes of the stress influence the stability of crust. The outcome of this study is an alternative approach to studying the stress and its change using forward modelling and the Earth's viscoelastic models. We show that the determined horizontal stress using a gravimetric method is consistent with tectonics and seismic activities. In addition, the secular rate of change of the horizontal stress, which is within 95 kPa/year, is larger outside the uplift dome than inside.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY KOREA, 2019
Keywords
horizontal stress, mantle convection, mass change, stress field, tectonics
National Category
Geophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-254006 (URN)10.1007/s12303-018-0046-8 (DOI)000469221700002 ()2-s2.0-85054552297 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190814

Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Gido, N. A. A., Bagherbandi, M., Sjoberg, L. E. & Tenzer, R. (2019). Studying permafrost by integrating satellite and in situ data in the northern high-latitude regions. Acta Geophysica, 67(2), 721-734
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying permafrost by integrating satellite and in situ data in the northern high-latitude regions
2019 (English)In: Acta Geophysica, ISSN 1895-6572, E-ISSN 1895-7455, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 721-734Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is an exceptional opportunity of achieving simultaneous and complementary data from a multitude of geoscience and environmental near-earth orbiting artificial satellites to study phenomena related to the climate change. These satellite missions provide the information about the various phenomena, such as sea level change, ice melting, soil moisture variation, temperature changes and earth surface deformations. In this study, we focus on permafrost thawing and its associated gravity change (in terms of the groundwater storage), and organic material changes using the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) data and other satellite- and ground-based observations. The estimation of permafrost changes requires combining information from various sources, particularly using the gravity field change, surface temperature change, and glacial isostatic adjustment. The most significant factor for a careful monitoring of the permafrost thawing is the fact that this process could be responsible for releasing an additional enormous amount of greenhouse gases emitted to the atmosphere, most importantly to mention carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane that are currently stored in the frozen ground. The results of a preliminary numerical analysis reveal a possible existence of a high correlation between the secular trends of greenhouse gases (CO2), temperature and equivalent water thickness (in permafrost active layer) in the selected regions. Furthermore, according to our estimates based on processing the GRACE data, the groundwater storage attributed due to permafrost thawing increased at the annual rates of 3.4, 3.8, 4.4 and 4.0cm, respectively, in Siberia, North Alaska and Canada (Yukon and Hudson Bay). Despite a rather preliminary character of our results, these findings indicate that the methodology developed and applied in this study should be further improved by incorporating the in situ permafrost measurements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG, 2019
Keywords
Climate change, Permafrost, Gravity, Grace, Greenhouse gas
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-251210 (URN)10.1007/s11600-019-00276-4 (DOI)000463780000022 ()2-s2.0-85062782688 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190527

Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Baranov, A., Tenzer, R. & Bagherbandi, M. (2018). Combined Gravimetric-Seismic Crustal Model for Antarctica. Surveys in geophysics, 39(1), 23-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined Gravimetric-Seismic Crustal Model for Antarctica
2018 (English)In: Surveys in geophysics, ISSN 0169-3298, E-ISSN 1573-0956, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 23-56Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The latest seismic data and improved information about the subglacial bedrock relief are used in this study to estimate the sediment and crustal thickness under the Antarctic continent. Since large parts of Antarctica are not yet covered by seismic surveys, the gravity and crustal structure models are used to interpolate the Moho information where seismic data are missing. The gravity information is also extended offshore to detect the Moho under continental margins and neighboring oceanic crust. The processing strategy involves the solution to the Vening Meinesz-Moritz's inverse problem of isostasy constrained on seismic data. A comparison of our new results with existing studies indicates a substantial improvement in the sediment and crustal models. The seismic data analysis shows significant sediment accumulations in Antarctica, with broad sedimentary basins. According to our result, the maximum sediment thickness in Antarctica is about 15 km under Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. The Moho relief closely resembles major geological and tectonic features. A rather thick continental crust of East Antarctic Craton is separated from a complex geological/tectonic structure of West Antarctica by the Transantarctic Mountains. The average Moho depth of 34.1 km under the Antarctic continent slightly differs from previous estimates. A maximum Moho deepening of 58.2 km under the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains in East Antarctica confirmed the presence of deep and compact orogenic roots. Another large Moho depth in East Antarctica is detected under Dronning Maud Land with two orogenic roots under Wohlthat Massif (48-50 km) and the Kottas Mountains (48-50 km) that are separated by a relatively thin crust along Jutulstraumen Rift. The Moho depth under central parts of the Transantarctic Mountains reaches 46 km. The maximum Moho deepening (34-38 km) in West Antarctica is under the Antarctic Peninsula. The Moho depth minima in East Antarctica are found under the Lambert Trench (24-28 km), while in West Antarctica the Moho depth minima are along the West Antarctic Rift System under the Bentley depression (20-22 km) and Ross Sea Ice Shelf (16-24 km). The gravimetric result confirmed a maximum extension of the Antarctic continental margins under the Ross Sea Embayment and the Weddell Sea Embayment with an extremely thin continental crust (10-20 km).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Antarctica, Crust, Gravity, Ice, Isostasy, Moho, Sediments, Seismic data
National Category
Geophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-221363 (URN)10.1007/s10712-017-9423-5 (DOI)000419172900002 ()
Note

QC 20180117

Available from: 2018-01-17 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2018-01-17Bibliographically approved
Baranov, A., Bagherbandi, M. & Tenzer, R. (2018). Combined Gravimetric-Seismic Moho Model of Tibet. GEOSCIENCES, 8(12), Article ID UNSP 461.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined Gravimetric-Seismic Moho Model of Tibet
2018 (English)In: GEOSCIENCES, ISSN 2076-3263, Vol. 8, no 12, article id UNSP 461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Substantial progress has been achieved over the last four decades to better understand a deep structure in the Himalayas and Tibet. Nevertheless, the remoteness of this part of the world still considerably limits the use of seismic data. A possible way to overcome this practical restriction partially is to use products from the Earth's satellite observation systems. Global topographic data are provided by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Global gravitational models have been derived from observables delivered by the gravity-dedicated satellite missions, such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). Optimally, the topographic and gravity data should be combined with available results from tomographic surveys to interpret the lithospheric structure, including also a Moho relief. In this study, we use seismic, gravity, and topographic data to estimate the Moho depth under orogenic structures of the Himalayas and Tibet. The combined Moho model is computed based on solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz (VMM) inverse problem of isostasy, while incorporating seismic data to constrain the gravimetric solution. The result of the combined gravimetric-seismic data analysis exhibits an anticipated more detailed structure of the Moho geometry when compared to the solution obtained merely from seismic data. This is especially evident over regions with sparse seismic data coverage. The newly-determined combined Moho model of Tibet shows a typical contrast between a thick crustal structure of orogenic formations compared to a thinner crust of continental basins. The Moho depth under most of the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau is typically within 60-70 km. The maximum Moho deepening of similar to 76 km occurs to the south of the Bangong-Nujiang suture under the Lhasa terrane. Local maxima of the Moho depth to similar to 74 km are also found beneath Taksha at the Karakoram fault. This Moho pattern generally agrees with the findings from existing gravimetric and seismic studies, but some inconsistencies are also identified and discussed in this study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
Moho, satellite gravity missions, seismic data, terrain model, Tibet, WEY JF, 1989, ECLOGAE GEOLOGICAE HELVETIAE, V82, P717 ang ZJ, 2002, SCIENCE IN CHINA SERIES D-EARTH SCIENCES, V45, P550 o Zhanyong, 2018, GEODESY AND GEODYNAMICS, V9, P334 porali A, 2000, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-SOLID EARTH, V105, P3103 rodov Davlatkhudzha, 2018, GEOPHYSICAL JOURNAL INTERNATIONAL, V214, P895 ang Zhongjie, 2010, EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS, V292, P254 ranov Alexey, 2018, SURVEYS IN GEOPHYSICS, V39, P23 a ShiXu, 2010, SCIENCE CHINA-EARTH SCIENCES, V53, P203 Chuang, 2017, JOURNAL OF ASIAN EARTH SCIENCES, V138, P378 tra S., 2008, BULLETIN OF THE SEISMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, V98, P2715 nzer Robert, 2016, JOURNAL OF EARTH SCIENCE, V27, P1045 nzer Robert, 2015, EARTH SCIENCES RESEARCH JOURNAL, V19, P97 in Young Hong, 2015, SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, V5, rt Christian, 2015, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATION AND GEOINFORMATION, V39, P103
National Category
Geophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-242257 (URN)10.3390/geosciences8120461 (DOI)000455388200034 ()
Note

QC 20190201

Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-06-07Bibliographically approved
Tenzer, R., Foroughi, I., Sjöberg, L. E., Bagherbandi, M., Hirt, C. & Pitonak, M. (2018). Definition of Physical Height Systems for Telluric Planets and Moons. Surveys in geophysics, 39(3), 313-335
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Definition of Physical Height Systems for Telluric Planets and Moons
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Surveys in geophysics, ISSN 0169-3298, E-ISSN 1573-0956, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 313-335Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In planetary sciences, the geodetic (geometric) heights defined with respect to the reference surface (the sphere or the ellipsoid) or with respect to the center of the planet/moon are typically used for mapping topographic surface, compilation of global topographic models, detailed mapping of potential landing sites, and other space science and engineering purposes. Nevertheless, certain applications, such as studies of gravity-driven mass movements, require the physical heights to be defined with respect to the equipotential surface. Taking the analogy with terrestrial height systems, the realization of height systems for telluric planets and moons could be done by means of defining the orthometric and geoidal heights. In this case, however, the definition of the orthometric heights in principle differs. Whereas the terrestrial geoid is described as an equipotential surface that best approximates the mean sea level, such a definition for planets/moons is irrelevant in the absence of (liquid) global oceans. A more natural choice for planets and moons is to adopt the geoidal equipotential surface that closely approximates the geometric reference surface (the sphere or the ellipsoid). In this study, we address these aspects by proposing a more accurate approach for defining the orthometric heights for telluric planets and moons from available topographic and gravity models, while adopting the average crustal density in the absence of reliable crustal density models. In particular, we discuss a proper treatment of topographic masses in the context of gravimetric geoid determination. In numerical studies, we investigate differences between the geodetic and orthometric heights, represented by the geoidal heights, on Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Moon. Our results reveal that these differences are significant. The geoidal heights on Mercury vary from - 132 to 166 m. On Venus, the geoidal heights are between - 51 and 137 m with maxima on this planet at Atla Regio and Beta Regio. The largest geoid undulations between - 747 and 1685 m were found on Mars, with the extreme positive geoidal heights under Olympus Mons in Tharsis region. Large variations in the geoidal geometry are also confirmed on the Moon, with the geoidal heights ranging from - 298 to 461 m. For comparison, the terrestrial geoid undulations are mostly within +/- 100 m. We also demonstrate that a commonly used method for computing the geoidal heights that disregards the differences between the gravity field outside and inside topographic masses yields relatively large errors. According to our estimates, these errors are - 0.3/+ 3.4 m for Mercury, 0.0/+ 13.3 m for Venus, - 1.4/+ 125.6 m for Mars, and - 5.6/+ 45.2 m for the Moon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Geoid, Gravity, Heights, Planets, Moon, Topography
National Category
Geophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-226751 (URN)10.1007/s10712-017-9457-8 (DOI)000429112400001 ()2-s2.0-85040314721 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180426

Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-04-26Bibliographically approved
Tenzer, R., Chen, W., Baranov, A. & Bagherbandi, M. (2018). Gravity Maps of Antarctic Lithospheric Structure from Remote-Sensing and Seismic Data. Pure and Applied Geophysics, 175(6), 2181-2203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gravity Maps of Antarctic Lithospheric Structure from Remote-Sensing and Seismic Data
2018 (English)In: Pure and Applied Geophysics, ISSN 0033-4553, E-ISSN 1420-9136, Vol. 175, no 6, p. 2181-2203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Remote-sensing data from altimetry and gravity satellite missions combined with seismic information have been used to investigate the Earth's interior, particularly focusing on the lithospheric structure. In this study, we use the subglacial bedrock relief BEDMAP2, the global gravitational model GOCO05S, and the ETOPO1 topographic/bathymetric data, together with a newly developed (continental-scale) seismic crustal model for Antarctica to compile the free-air, Bouguer, and mantle gravity maps over this continent and surrounding oceanic areas. We then use these gravity maps to interpret the Antarctic crustal and uppermost mantle structure. We demonstrate that most of the gravity features seen in gravity maps could be explained by known lithospheric structures. The Bouguer gravity map reveals a contrast between the oceanic and continental crust which marks the extension of the Antarctic continental margins. The isostatic signature in this gravity map confirms deep and compact orogenic roots under the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and more complex orogenic structures under Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica. Whereas the Bouguer gravity map exhibits features which are closely spatially correlated with the crustal thickness, the mantle gravity map reveals mainly the gravitational signature of the uppermost mantle, which is superposed over a weaker (long-wavelength) signature of density heterogeneities distributed deeper in the mantle. In contrast to a relatively complex and segmented uppermost mantle structure of West Antarctica, the mantle gravity map confirmed a more uniform structure of the East Antarctic Craton. The most pronounced features in this gravity map are divergent tectonic margins along mid-oceanic ridges and continental rifts. Gravity lows at these locations indicate that a broad region of the West Antarctic Rift System continuously extends between the Atlantic-Indian and Pacific-Antarctic mid-oceanic ridges and it is possibly formed by two major fault segments. Gravity lows over the Transantarctic Mountains confirms their non-collisional origin. Additionally, more localized gravity lows closely coincide with known locations of hotspots and volcanic regions (Marie Byrd Land, Balleny Islands, Mt. Erebus). Gravity lows also suggest a possible hotspot under the South Orkney Islands. However, this finding has to be further verified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER BASEL AG, 2018
Keywords
Antarctica, crust, gravity, lithosphere, upper mantle
National Category
Geophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232266 (URN)10.1007/s00024-018-1795-z (DOI)000435590500017 ()2-s2.0-85048805707 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180719

Available from: 2018-07-19 Created: 2018-07-19 Last updated: 2018-07-19Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, L. E. & Bagherbandi, M. (2017). Gravity inversion and integration: Theory and applications in geodesy and geophysics. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gravity inversion and integration: Theory and applications in geodesy and geophysics
2017 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book contains theory and applications of gravity both for physical geodesy and geophysics. It identifies classical and modern topics for studying the Earth. Worked-out examples illustrate basic but important concepts of the Earth's gravity field. In addition, coverage details the Geodetic Reference System 1980, a versatile tool in most applications of gravity data. The authors first introduce the necessary mathematics. They then review classic physical geodesy, including its integral formulas, height systems and their determinations. The next chapter presents modern physical geodesy starting with the original concepts of M.S. Molodensky. A major part of this chapter is a variety of modifying Stokes' formula for geoid computation by combining terrestrial gravity data and an Earth Gravitational Model. Coverage continues with a discussion that compares today's methods for modifying Stokes' formulas for geoid and quasigeoid determination, a description of several modern tools in physical geodesy, and a review of methods for gravity inversion as well as analyses for temporal changes of the gravity field. This book aims to broaden the view of scientists and students in geodesy and geophysics. With a focus on theory, it provides basic and some in-depth knowledge about the field from a geodesist's perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017. p. 383
National Category
Geophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-223079 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-50298-4 (DOI)2-s2.0-85032838381 (Scopus ID)9783319502984 (ISBN)9783319502977 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20180214

Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Abrehdary, M., Sjöberg, L. E., Bagherbandi, M. & Sampietro, D. (2017). Towards the Moho depth and Moho density contrast along with their uncertainties from seismic and satellite gravity observations. Journal of Applied Geodesy, 11(4), 231-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards the Moho depth and Moho density contrast along with their uncertainties from seismic and satellite gravity observations
2017 (English)In: Journal of Applied Geodesy, ISSN 1862-9016, E-ISSN 1862-9024, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a combined method for estimating a new global Moho model named KTH15C, containing Moho depth and Moho density contrast (or shortly Moho parameters), from a combination of global models of gravity (GOCO05S), topography (DTM2006) and seismic information (CRUST1.0 and MDN07) to a resolution of 1 degrees x 1 degrees based on a solution of Vening Meinesz-Moritz' inverse problem of isostasy. This paper also aims modelling of the observation standard errors propagated from the Vening Meinesz-Moritz and CRUST1.0 models in estimating the uncertainty of the final Moho model. The numerical results yield Moho depths ranging from 6.5 to 70.3 km, and the estimated Moho density contrasts ranging from 21 to 650 kg/m(3), respectively. Moreover, test computations display that in most areas estimated uncertainties in the parameters are less than 3 km and 50 kg/m(3), respectively, but they reach to more significant values under Gulf of Mexico, Chile, Eastern Mediterranean, Timor sea and parts of polar regions. Comparing the Moho depths estimated by KTH15C and those derived by KTH11C, GEMMA2012C, CRUST1.0, KTH14C, CRUST14 and GEMMA1.0 models shows that KTH15C agree fairly well with CRUST1.0 but rather poor with other models. The Moho density contrasts estimated by KTH15C and those of the KTH11C, KTH14C and VMM model agree to 112, 31 and 61 kg/m(3) in RMS. The regional numerical studies show that the RMS differences between KTH15C and Moho depths from seismic information yields fits of 2 to 4 km in South and North America, Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and Antarctica, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WALTER DE GRUYTER GMBH, 2017
Keywords
Vening Meinesz-Moritz, CRUST1.0, MDN07, Moho depth, Moho density contrast, uncertainty
National Category
Remote Sensing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-215436 (URN)10.1515/jag-2017-0019 (DOI)000411518900003 ()2-s2.0-85030327802 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171019

Available from: 2017-10-19 Created: 2017-10-19 Last updated: 2017-10-19Bibliographically approved
Tenzer, R. & Bagherbandi, M. (2016). Comparative study of the uniform and variable moho density contrast in the vening Meinesz-Moritz’s isostatic scheme for the gravimetric moho recovery. In: International Association of Geodesy Symposia vol. 144: . Paper presented at 3rd International Gravity Field Service, IGFS 2014; Shanghai; China; 30 June 2014 through 6 July 2014 (pp. 199-207). Springer, 144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative study of the uniform and variable moho density contrast in the vening Meinesz-Moritz’s isostatic scheme for the gravimetric moho recovery
2016 (English)In: International Association of Geodesy Symposia vol. 144, Springer, 2016, Vol. 144, p. 199-207Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In gravimetric methods for a determination of the Moho geometry, the constant value of the Moho density contract is often adopted. Results of gravimetric and seismic studies, however, showed that the Moho density contrast varies significantly. The assumption of a uniform density contrast thus might yield large errors in the estimated Moho depths. In this study we investigate these errors by comparing the Moho depths determined globally for the uniform and variable models of the Moho density contrast. These two gravimetric results are obtained based on solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz’s inverse problem of isostasy. The uniform model of the Moho density contrast is defined individually for the continental and oceanic lithosphere to better reproduce the reality. The global data of the lower crust and upper mantle retrieved from the CRUST1.0 seismic crustal model are used to define the variable Moho density contrast. This seismic model is also used to validate both gravimetric solutions. Results of our numerical experiment reveals that the consideration of the variable Moho density contrast improves the agreement between the gravimetric and seismic Moho models; the RMS of differences is 5.4 km (for the uniform density contrast) and 4.7 km (for the variable density contrast).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Series
International Association of Geodesy Symposia, ISSN 0939-9585 ; 144
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259631 (URN)10.1007/1345_2015_210 (DOI)2-s2.0-85014212522 (Scopus ID)9783319398198 (ISBN)
Conference
3rd International Gravity Field Service, IGFS 2014; Shanghai; China; 30 June 2014 through 6 July 2014
Note

QC 20191014

Available from: 2019-09-19 Created: 2019-09-19 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
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