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(2023). Climate-Proof Planning: Creative Design Solutions in Stockholm. Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate-Proof Planning: Creative Design Solutions in Stockholm
2023 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

The waterfront of Stockholm, one of Europe's fastest-growing cities, stands at the forefront of climate change challenges. As such, there is a pressing need for innovative solutions and resilient urban design. The SOS Climate Waterfront research project gathered international experts and local representatives, coming from different disciplines to work together in May-June 2022 to discuss, explore proposals and design Sustainable Open Solutions (SOS).

This book explores three urban sites in Stockholm, holding significant implications for the city's waterfront— Lövholmen, Frihamnen, and Södra Värtan. During the workshop, SOS Climate Waterfront participants, mainly European researchers, analyzed future challenges, raised new questions, and depicted solutions, which can now contribute to cross-country comparisons in a larger EU-framework.

The three sites are not only driven by the demand for more housing but also face crucial issues related to cultural heritage, climate change, landscape ecology, and social development. Achieving a delicate balance between these aspects and economic interests presents a significant task for the city. The waterfront of Stockholm holds substantial relevance in the context of climate change and its impact on coastal areas. Thus, analysis of the Swedish context, based on data collected and on-site knowledge sustains a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

Stockholm is expected to be affected by the impacts of climate change, including temperature increases, changing precipitation patterns, and the potential for more frequent cloudbursts. While the rising sea level is a long-term challenge rather than an immediate concern, increasing risks of extreme weather events and flooding were taken in consideration.

Stockholm rests on two different bodies of water, at a location where the Baltic Sea (Östersjön in Swedish) with brackish water meets Lake Mälaren, which is an important provider of freshwater for the larger Stockholm area. As the lyrics of a popular contemporary Swedish song (by Robert Broberg) describe it: “the city is full of water”. However, to ensure that the ecological and chemical status will be maintained, in facing future challenges in terms of urbanisation and climate change, much attention has been paid to ensure the preservation of the water quality of the Mälaren Lake, a vital water source for two million people.

The city values its water and continuously invests in improving the situation (e.g. the new sluice at Slussen). The activities carried out in the SOS Climate Waterfront workshop in Stockholm integrated this relationship to water as well as the continuing land-rise, the balance of which adds complexity to the sea level modelling and therefore also to the anticipations and scenarios for the future.

In this book, the authors explore innovative strategies and design proposals to tackle these challenges while preserving the cultural identity and heritage value of the sites. Researchers from various European cities, supported by experts and academic lectures, analyze extensive input materials and information, ranging from planning documents and historical records to consultation reports and city visions. By drawing upon multidisciplinary backgrounds and experiences, the researchers identify the socioeconomic and environmental qualities of each site, ultimately developing site design concepts and solutions that address climate change challenges, the maintenance of cultural identities, and the protection of biodiversity.

Throughout the book, the proposed designs emphasize the importance of finding a balance between preserving cultural heritage, the values of local communities, the stimulating economic growth, and promotion of sustainable urban development. Key elements include the reuse of existing infrastructure, the integration of green-blue schemes, the improvement of biodiversity, and the creation of vibrant and multi-functional neighbourhoods that connect people to each other and their surroundings.

While design solutions present promising approaches, their implementation and the institutional challenges that may arise in specific city contexts remain external to the results presented here. The book acknowledges the need for further research and highlights the shared recognition among the workshop participants regarding the gaps and blind spots in their findings.

The following chapters of the book delve into climate change in Sweden, the role of culture and arts in the environmental movement, and specific case studies and design proposals for each site. By exploring these diverse perspectives, this book aims to contribute to the ongoing discourse on sustainable urban design and planning, to inspire innovative approaches in addressing complex challenges faced by Stockholm in the future.

PART 1 of the book offers a comprehensive understanding of climate change in Sweden, street fishing in Stockholm, and the role of culture and arts in the environmental movement in the Nordic Region and internationally. Furthermore, the lessons from Stockholm and its surroundings in this report draw on presentations, by professionals and researchers from various fields, made during the workshop. Some of these lessons have been written into interesting articles, introduced below.

The chapter “Climate change in Sweden” by Magnus Joelsson from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) provides an updated analysis with data and the context for discussing climate change in Sweden. The text makes the distinction between weather and climate, referring to the expression “Climate is what you expect, weather is what you get” that Mark Twain is said to have coined. Moreover, calling for actions by emphasising that the trend of climate change is expected to continue, both globally and in Sweden. What will happen in the far future still depends on our actions, now and in the future.

The contribution entitled “Urban nature does not stop at the waterfront, neither should urban planning, a case study of street fishing in Stockholm” raises questions about how planning and strategies for waterfront areas in cities should consider more perspectives from a wider group of interests. It discusses how urban dwellers live with water, with a focus on recreational fishing and what this use entails. The authors (Anja Moum Rieser, from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Wieben Johannes Boonstra and Rikard Hedling, both from Uppsala University) go beyond the human-centric view and expand the gaze to other species’ needs and also incorporating the body of water in planning for the urban waterfront areas.

The chapter “The role of culture and arts in the environmental movement in the Nordic Region and internationally” by Elisavet Papageorgiou and Iwona Preis from Intercult, discusses artistic perspectives on sustainability and climate change. This focuses on how art and culture can raise awareness, provide inspiring actions, and promote social cohesion around sustainable practices. Drawing on experiences from projects aiming to invite and engage community dialogues, they argue that artistic strategies can challenge dominant narratives and promote alternative visions for a sustainable future.

The contribution “Sense the Marsh” by Thelma Dethelfsen from KTH The Royal Institute of Technology, emphasises the importance of architecture and landscape design in creating adaptive and resilient strategies to manage flooding and sea level rise. The study focuses on how designs can encourage interaction and awareness with the surroundings. Thereby highlighting the interfaces between humans and nature and raising questions about how flooding can be used as a quality and catalyst to attract more people to an area. The resulting design provides an opportunity to experience nature though the design and architectural solutions, situated on the border between human, non-human species and nature.

In PART 2, readers will explore the detailed design proposals developed by different groups for the urban sites in focus. These proposals aim to intertwine sustainability, cultural identity, and economic interests, offering insights into the potential for resilient and vibrant urban spaces.

By assessing existing conditions on three sites analysed in Stockholm, including Lövholmen, Frihamnen, and Södra Värtan, the teams participating in the workshop actively contributed to the analysis of the sites and development of design solutions for the areas, in the end forming strategies for better preparedness for future challenges and better lives for the inhabitants.

Lövholmen is located in the north-western part of Liljeholmen, one of the major developmental centres in Stockholm. The area is currently a closed-off industrial site, but the municipality’s intention is to redevelop it into a mixed urban space with homes, workplaces, shops, schools, and more. It's expected that 1500 new homes will be built in the area. Many of the current industrial buildings are empty and in bad shape. While some of these will be replaced with housing, other industrial buildings have heritage value and should be protected during the development, after which a new use should be found for them. Frihamnen is, together with the Södra Värtan project, part of the larger development of ”Norra Djurgårdsstaden”, the Stockholm Royal Seaport. Frihamnen is located to the south of Värtahamnen and is in turn strongly connected to Loudden in the south. The municipality plans for the area to contain approximately 1700 homes, 4000 workplaces and 75,000 m2 of retail and office space. Some of the existing businesses in Frihamnen will remain, but much of the existing infrastructure is planned to be removed. The harbour no longer handles freight shipping, but passenger ships will continue to depart from the harbour (Frihamnspiren).

Södra Värtan is planned to contain 1500 apartments, 20 preschool departments, 155,000 m2 of office and retail space, as well as 10,000 m2 of parks and a 600 m long waterfront walkway. The new development is intended to co-exist with the activities in the harbour, which creates challenges such as the blocking of noise stemming from the cruise ships. The walkways along the waterfront are planned to have shops and restaurants.

The contributions of the articles, together with the SOS Climate Waterfront teams’ analysis of the three sites in Stockholm, provides relevant and timely interdisciplinary efforts to co-create novel solutions and future strategies to manage the climate challenges ahead.

The solutions relate to the history of the urban territory, actors involved (or those excluded) and changes, over time, of planning ideals. A key theme is how to plan by creating inclusive strategies for the future by involving representatives of diverse interests, competences, and future visions for the sites. The consequences of climate change are affecting these different stakeholders and citizens in a wide range of ways, so including them in the process is crucial. This also includes the inclusion of future generations’ views on urban transformation. The largest challenge is to create new, novel solutions where these human interests, as well as those of local nature and non-human species, can be incorporated, in an effort to plan and design for a mitigation and management of the consequences of climate change.

As we embark on this journey of exploration and innovation, we invite readers to delve into the pages of this book, where interdisciplinary research, creative design, and a shared commitment to sustainable urban development and decarbonisation strategies converge. Together, let us envision a future where cities thrive, harmoniously balancing their heritage, environment, and economic aspirations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2023. p. 63
Series
TRITA-ABE-RPT ; 2311
Keywords
climate change
National Category
History Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Climate Research
Research subject
Architecture, Urban Design; Planning and Decision Analysis, Strategies for sustainable development; Planning and Decision Analysis, Urban and Regional Studies; History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-339431 (URN)978-91-8040-654-3 (ISBN)
Projects
SOS Climate Waterfront https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/823901
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 823901
Note

QC 20231115

Available from: 2023-11-09 Created: 2023-11-09 Last updated: 2023-11-15Bibliographically approved
Janhager Stier, J., Stattin, E. & Larsen, K. (2023). Innovation ecosystem challenges: - Experiences from socially critical digitalization projects. In: Proceedings of the XXXIV ISPIM Innovation Conference: Innovation and Circular Economy. Paper presented at XXXIV ISPIM Innovation Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation ecosystem challenges: - Experiences from socially critical digitalization projects
2023 (English)In: Proceedings of the XXXIV ISPIM Innovation Conference: Innovation and Circular Economy, 2023Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Solving many current societal challenges requires collaboration between numerous actors from different disciplines. However, there are several challenges in these interdisciplinary collaborations that have managerial implications, which this article aims to describe. The study is based on observations and fourteen interviews with actors from three innovation ecosystems (IES) that attack the challenges with the help of digitalization and enabling technology. Examples of identified challenges are difficulties for participating competitors to cooperate, that actors may feel threatened by the approaching result from the collaboration, that the actors may have different underlying motives for participating in the IES, and difficulties for actors to understand each other due to different domain knowledge.

Keywords
Innovation ecosystems, orchestration, digitalization, challenges, non-business driven, wicked problems
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Machine Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-328252 (URN)
Conference
XXXIV ISPIM Innovation Conference
Funder
Vinnova
Note

QC 20230614

Available from: 2023-06-06 Created: 2023-06-06 Last updated: 2023-06-14Bibliographically approved
Berg Mårtensson, H., Larsen, K. & Höjer, M. (2023). Investigating potential effects of mobility and accessibility services using the avoid-shift-improve framework. Sustainable cities and society, 96, 104676-104676, Article ID 104676.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating potential effects of mobility and accessibility services using the avoid-shift-improve framework
2023 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 96, p. 104676-104676, article id 104676Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mobility services and accessibility services could contribute to reduced car-dependency and a more sustainable transport system. However, uncertainty remains regarding what the effects will be and further research is needed. In this paper we examine potential effects on passenger car-travel in an urban context. To do so, we actuate the Avoid-Shift-Improve (ASI) framework using a System Dynamics approach and develop thematic Causal Loop Diagrams. We draw on the findings from a literature study and workshops engaging actors involved in creating visions and planning for the future of mobility and accessibility services in Stockholm, Sweden. The effects discovered are categorized as direct, enabling and structural/systemic, using a retrofitted version of the Three-Levels Model. Contributions include the mapping of mechanisms through which the services can have positive and negative effects in relation to ASI, demonstrating a high degree of interconnectedness. This includes potential synergetic and competitive relations between the services. In addition, the approach gives insight to potential cumulative impact of the services, relatable to Mobility as a Service, including ‘user near’ effects regarding, e.g., commuting and leisure travel, as well as systemic and structural level effects. A discussion is conducted on the implications for actors and policy-makers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2023
Keywords
Mobility service, Accessibility service, Mobility as a service, Sustainable urban mobility, Avoid-shift-improve, Car travel, Climate change, Environmental sustainability, System dynamics, Three-levels model of effects
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-328175 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2023.104676 (DOI)001011588700001 ()2-s2.0-85160727698 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20230706

Available from: 2023-06-03 Created: 2023-06-03 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Salö, L., Benner, M., Bjare, U., Hylmö, A., Larsen, K. & Eugenia, P. V. (2021). A philosophy of yes: Eulogies of a one-man think tank (1ed.). In: Wormbs, N., Kaijser, A., Höhler, S., Benner, M., Armiero, M. (Ed.), In His Own Environment: En festskrift till Sverker Sörlin (pp. 80-87). Stockholm: Historiska studier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A philosophy of yes: Eulogies of a one-man think tank
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2021 (English)In: In His Own Environment: En festskrift till Sverker Sörlin / [ed] Wormbs, N., Kaijser, A., Höhler, S., Benner, M., Armiero, M., Stockholm: Historiska studier , 2021, 1, p. 80-87Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Historiska studier, 2021 Edition: 1
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-306877 (URN)
Note

QC 20220113

Part of book: ISBN 978-91-987130-7-7

Available from: 2022-01-01 Created: 2022-01-01 Last updated: 2024-03-18Bibliographically approved
Larsen, K., Karpouzoglou, T. & Nilsson, D. (2021). Co-creative processes between the arts, engineering, and science in constructing new imaginaries of critical infrastructures. In: : . Paper presented at STREAMS –Transformative Enviromental Humanities.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-creative processes between the arts, engineering, and science in constructing new imaginaries of critical infrastructures
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we explore co-creative processes between researchers, art institutions and artists and new roles emerging for engineers in that process. The modern infrastructure ideal of universal, uniform, networked infrastructure has dominated the imagination of planners and engineers in the Global North and South for over a century. However, the dawn of the Anthropocene has triggered new concerns and challenges for critical infrastructures (water, electricity roads etc.) disrupting the modernist imagination. Somewhat unsurprisingly, these concerns have been translated into academic and policy discourses about the development of more resilient and socially inclusive critical infrastructures. 

In the ongoing project entitled Examining nature and society through urban infrastructure (NATURE) we develop an art exhibition in collaboration with the art institution Färgfabriken, in south of Stockholm. Sketches from the co-creative dialogues and interviews are used to illustrate how art can have a more central role the intellectual and public policy deliberations that shape new imaginaries of critical infrastructures.  Future development of infrastructure may once again become trapped into a (less resilient and less inclusive) modernist pathway. In other words, today’s infrastructure challenges pose a threat to critical infrastructures but also a window of opportunity for environmental humanities propose strong and novel ideas shaping future infrastructures. In this paper, we will explore how the arts can help draw attention to the importance of the role of previously unarticulated socio-natures and the role of the non-human in infrastructure imaginaries. The aim of the paper is also to initiate a discussion about how arts can become catalytic for translating key insights on critical infrastructures from the environmental humanities into more widely accessible and publicly deliberated. 

National Category
Social Sciences Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-327452 (URN)
Conference
STREAMS –Transformative Enviromental Humanities
Note

QC 20230529

Available from: 2023-05-29 Created: 2023-05-29 Last updated: 2023-05-29Bibliographically approved
Larsen, K. (2020). Co-creation of exhibitionon water, augmented art and nature-city relations.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-creation of exhibitionon water, augmented art and nature-city relations
2020 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) [Artistic work]
Keywords
symbiosis, nature, water resources
National Category
Visual Arts
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-291209 (URN)
Projects
NATURE, Examining nature-society relations through urban infrastructure
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Note

QC 20210308

Available from: 2021-03-04 Created: 2021-03-04 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Broström, A., Geschwind, L. & Larsen, K. (2020). Concluding Discussion: The Past, Present, and Future of Technical Universities (1ed.). In: Geschwind, L., Broström, A., Larsen, K (Ed.), Technical Universities: Past, Present and Future (pp. 227-242). Cham: Springer Nature
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concluding Discussion: The Past, Present, and Future of Technical Universities
2020 (English)In: Technical Universities: Past, Present and Future / [ed] Geschwind, L., Broström, A., Larsen, K, Cham: Springer Nature, 2020, 1, p. 227-242Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Higher education institutions identified as ‘technical universities’ enjoy considerable status in many countries. Yet studies of boundary negotiations from a range of settings suggest that opportunities to transform into a broader, research-based university often takes precedence over the alternative vision of remaining or moving towards becoming a focused technical university. In this chapter, we discuss alternative explanations for the lacklustre appeal of the latter type of institutional template, and outline a roadmap for how the historical legacy of the technical university may be cultivated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer Nature, 2020 Edition: 1
Series
Higher Education Dynamics
National Category
Social Sciences Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Technology and Learning; Industrial Economics and Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-284119 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-50555-4_12 (DOI)2-s2.0-85103936621 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Note

QC 20201104

Part of book ISBN 978-3-030-50555-4

Available from: 2020-10-14 Created: 2020-10-14 Last updated: 2023-03-30Bibliographically approved
Larsen, K. & et al., . (2020). ERA-NET Cofund Smart Cities and Communities - Experiences and Insights.: Synthesis report JPI Urban Europe published by IQ-Samhällsbyggnad. Stockholm: Urban Europe
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ERA-NET Cofund Smart Cities and Communities - Experiences and Insights.: Synthesis report JPI Urban Europe published by IQ-Samhällsbyggnad
2020 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Urban Europe, 2020
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Architecture, Urban Design; History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-272866 (URN)
Note

QC 20200603

Available from: 2020-05-03 Created: 2020-05-03 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Larsen, K., Geschwind, L. & Broström, A. (2020). Organisational identities, boundaries, and change processes of technical universities.. In: Geschwind, Broström and Larsen (Ed.), Technical Universities - Past, Present and Future: . Springer Nature
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organisational identities, boundaries, and change processes of technical universities.
2020 (English)In: Technical Universities - Past, Present and Future / [ed] Geschwind, Broström and Larsen, Springer Nature, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The volume is concerned with how technical universities respond to external influences but also are guided by internal processes of identity formation and reshaping of ideals and boundaries. In this chapter, we present two lines of inquiry and introduce the chapter contributions of the volume. An overarching question driving our research is what it means to be, or not to be, a technical university. The two main lines of inquiry, both related to the organisational identity of technical universities, are focusing on: (i) formation of ideals and boundaries and (ii) responses to change and how it relates to formation and re-negotiations of identity. Empirically, the volume limits its scope to Europe drawing on experiences from various national contexts. The empirical analysis focuses on identity formation processes but is nevertheless informed about ideas (and ideals) associated with technical universities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2020
Series
Higher Education Dynamics, ISSN 1571-0378, E-ISSN 2215-1923 ; 56
Keywords
higher education institutions, technical universities, organizational identity, innovation, science policy
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-272869 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-50555-4_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85103988990 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Note

QC 20200603

Part of book ISBN 978-3-030-50555-4

Available from: 2020-05-03 Created: 2020-05-03 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Larsen, K. (2020). Urban Lunch talk #10, The Swedish Centre for Innovation and Quality in the Built Environment “From project Fraction to Synthesis Action”: Presenting studies of user perspectives in urban planning presented in project synthesis report: ERA-NET Cofund, Smart Cities and Communities – Experiences and insights.. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Lunch talk #10, The Swedish Centre for Innovation and Quality in the Built Environment “From project Fraction to Synthesis Action”: Presenting studies of user perspectives in urban planning presented in project synthesis report: ERA-NET Cofund, Smart Cities and Communities – Experiences and insights.
2020 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm: , 2020
Keywords
co-creation, societal challenges, JPI Urban Europe
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-291210 (URN)
Note

QC 20210308

Available from: 2021-03-04 Created: 2021-03-04 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4360-0412

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