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Tornberg, Patrik
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Johansson, F., Tornberg, P. & Fernström, A. (2018). A function-oriented approach to transport planning in Sweden: Limits and possibilities from a policy perspective. Transport Policy, 63, 30-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A function-oriented approach to transport planning in Sweden: Limits and possibilities from a policy perspective
2018 (English)In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 63, p. 30-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on sustainability and transport has paid increasing attention to how the purpose of the transport system is framed, often arguing that there is a need to shift the focus of transport planning and policy from the physical infrastructure to mobility and accessibility. Sweden's national transport policy also has elements of this shift, most noticeable in the so-called four step principle, where the possibility to affect the need for transport and choice of transport mode (step 1) and the possibility to use existing infrastructure more efficiently (step 2) should be considered before large reconstructions (step 3) or new infrastructure (step 4) is chosen as the solution to transport related problems. The aim of this article is to study whether the practical implications of Swedish national transport policy are consistent with the ambitions expressed in the four step principle, with particular focus on the Swedish Transport Administration's (STA) mandate to finance different measures. Based on an analysis of policy documents and semi-structured interviews the main finding of the analysis is that many step 1 and 2 measures do not fall within the financial mandate of the STA. The implementation of the four step principle therefore depends on the commitment among other actors than the STA to implement step 1 and 2 measures. Furthermore, it is concluded that the limits to the STA mandate has consequences for the ability of the STA to engage in collaboration with the actors on which it depends, and that strengthening the STA's mandate to finance a desired function rather than physical infrastructure is likely to increase commitment among other stakeholders to work with these measures. Such a step would imply a different regulatory framework than the current, more in line with ”the sustainable mobility paradigm” (Banister 2008) and could contribute to a good accessibility to different amenities at the same time as negative environmental impacts are reduced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Collaboration, Commitment, Four step principle, Networks, Sweden
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-219632 (URN)10.1016/j.tranpol.2017.11.006 (DOI)000425478300003 ()2-s2.0-85035136019 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171211

Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-22Bibliographically approved
Tornberg, P. & Odhage, J. (2018). Making transport planning more collaborative?: The case of Strategic Choice of Measures in Swedish transport planning. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 118, 416-429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making transport planning more collaborative?: The case of Strategic Choice of Measures in Swedish transport planning
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 118, p. 416-429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2013, a new preparatory study was established in the Swedish national transport planning process: Strategic Choice of Measures (SCM). It constitutes an arena for early dialogue between main actors and stakeholders at local, regional and national level to jointly assess transport related problems and develop solutions. This paper explores the collaborative elements of this planning method, analysing the extent to which the introduction of SCM implies fundamental steps towards a planning approach based on communicative rationality in Swedish national transport planning. The article departs from the government's recognition of the need for more and deeper collaboration between actors, new approaches and measures for transport problem, and increasing attention to demand management and modal shift to meet transport policy goals more efficiently, asking whether SCM makes national transport planning in Sweden more collaborative, in the sense of primarily relying on communicative rationality. The focus of the analysis lies on collaborative elements in the official SCM guidelines produced by the Swedish Transport Administration (STA) as an expression of an “ideal” SCM process, and a case study of an SCM process considered by the STA to be a good example of SCM in practice. The article concludes that although traces of communicative rationality are visible in both “ideal” and in practice, a more fundamental shift from instrumental to communicative rationality in Swedish national transport planning through the introduction of SCM has not occurred, since collaborative practices of SCM mainly are framed in a wider institutional framework of instrumental rationality. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Collaborative planning, Communicative rationality, Instrumental rationality, Strategic Choice of Measures, Transport planning, Wicked problems, Public policy, Transportation, Instrumental rationalities, Strategic choice, Problem solving
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236582 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2018.09.020 (DOI)000452941000028 ()2-s2.0-85054191887 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration
Note

QC 20181126

Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Tornberg, P. & Odhage, J. (2018). Meningen med gemensamma planeringssammanhang: En studie i nyttan med åtgärdsvalsstudier.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meningen med gemensamma planeringssammanhang: En studie i nyttan med åtgärdsvalsstudier
2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Following a reformation of the Swedish national transport planning system in 2013, Strategic Choice of Measures (SCM) was introduced by the Swedish Transport Administration as a new preparatory study prior to formal decisions on measures to solve transport related problems. SCM is a dialogue based informal planning process carried out at the early stages of the national transport planning process, with the aim to identify solutions in close cooperation between key actors and stakeholders, based on a multimodal approach and the so called four step principle. According to the four step principle, solutions to transport related problems should be developed and assessed stepwise, where measures that influence the demand for transport and choice of transport mode (step 1) and make use of existing infrastructure more efficiently (step 2) are considered before minor reconstruction (step 3) and the construction of new infrastructure (step 4). As a new planning step, SCM has been fully established on the national transport planning scene, and around 1000 SCM’s have been conducted over the last five years.

This study is initiated and commissioned by the Swedish Transport Administration with the purpose to investigate values, or benefits, created through SCM. Two questions have guided the inquiry:

  • What types of benefits does SCM create?
  • How is the creation of benefits through SCM related to different underlying conditions?

The study is conducted within a theoretical framework of three different types of planning – communicative, strategic and classic rational planning – and the conceptual distinction between wicked and tame problems. As a theoretical framework for analysis it is recognized that the three types of planning are associated with different aims and relate differently to wicked and tame problems. While a communicative planning process is concerned with a consensual understanding of the wickedness of problems, a strategic planning process is action oriented and concerned with taming wicked problems to make them manageable, and a classic rational planning process involves the search for optimal solutions to given ends, treating problems as tame. SCM is seen as a hybrid of the three types of planning and therefore potentially associated with different kinds of benefits. The empirical section of the inquiry consists of two parts. The main part is five case studies of ongoing and completed SCM processes. This qualitative section has been supplemented with a quantitative overview of the aggregated mass of completed SCM’s since 2013.

The study concludes that the hybrid idea of SCM, as described in steering and guiding documents is more nuanced in practice. The extent and presence of the three planning types differ from case to case. Some of the cases display signs of a communicative process to develop a shared understanding of the problems at stake among a diverse set of actors. All cases provide clear examples of strategic framing and taming processes through focusing on selected issues and the interests of interdependent key actors. The optimization ideal of the classic rational planning approach is reflected in ambitions to find the best possible solutions, but the results of the processes appear to be derived from consensus among key actors on the suitability of certain courses of action rather than objectively decided criteria for comparison of efficiency and benefits of alternative solutions.

Throughout these processes we find that the values and benefits from an SCM process could best be described in terms of a strategic planning process, with an emphasis on coordination, performance, and action – often concerned with measures that have been considered previously but not in the kind of shared planning contexts illuminated by the SCM process. It is therefore as a strategic planning method we see the clearest benefits with SCM. We also find that SCM has the potential to be more fully used as a communicative planning method to develop more multifaceted understandings of transport related problems in specific situations, at certain windows of opportunities if the STA has such an ambition.

Publisher
p. 197
Series
TRITA-ABE-RPT ; 1842
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240298 (URN)978-91-7873-070-4 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration
Note

QC 20181219

Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
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