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Forsman, Mikael, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5777-4232
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Publications (10 of 183) Show all publications
Elvnäs, S., Carter, N. & Forsman, M. (2024). Assessing and improving supervisory behaviours at standardised meetings using self-recorded video and the operant supervisory taxonomy index. International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, 11(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing and improving supervisory behaviours at standardised meetings using self-recorded video and the operant supervisory taxonomy index
2024 (English)In: International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, ISSN 2045-7804, E-ISSN 2045-7812, Vol. 11, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims of this study were to use the operant supervisory taxonomy index (OSTI) with self-recorded videos: 1) to assess three crucial supervisory behaviours at recurrent workplace meetings; 2) to assess an intervention to increase supervisors' use of performance consequences; 3) to demonstrate how using OSTI with video for studying supervisor-employee interactions contributes to the field of human factors and ergonomics. Eight supervisors at a technical company video-recorded themselves at standardised daily staff meetings for ten weeks (360 videos, in total). All supervisors increased their delivery of performance consequences per meeting after participating in weekly sessions focusing on their use of this behaviour. The use of the crucial supervisory behaviours varied within and between supervisors. A combination of self-recorded videos over time and OSTI is a useful method for objectively analysing supervisor performance in detail and can contribute to improving supervisory behaviours and their impact on performance and health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Inderscience Publishers, 2024
Keywords
OSTI, leadership, intervention, feedback, management, agile, transformational, first-line managers, organisational behaviour management, OBM
National Category
Medical Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-350047 (URN)10.1504/IJHFE.2024.139191 (DOI)001253475600002 ()2-s2.0-85197946710 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240705

Available from: 2024-07-05 Created: 2024-07-05 Last updated: 2024-07-17Bibliographically approved
Mikhaltchouk, I., Eklund, J. & Forsman, M. (2024). Barriers and Facilitators for Usage of Self-Compacting Concrete—An Interview Study. Inventions, 9(3), Article ID 50.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers and Facilitators for Usage of Self-Compacting Concrete—An Interview Study
2024 (English)In: Inventions, E-ISSN 2411-5134, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Workers in the construction industry must endure different weather conditions, long working hours, and engage in repetitive and strenuous jobs with unrealistic deadlines. Sick leaves, caused by accidents and by work-related diseases, are common in the construction industry. Hand–arm vibration from hand-held power tools is a cause of significant ill health (disorders of the blood vessels, nerves, and joints). Self-compacting concrete (SCC) is a fluid concrete and does not need to be vibrated. Despite the health advantages of SCC, its market share in Sweden is lower than in comparable countries. The aim of this article is to describe views, opinions, and knowledge concerning the work environment and health in concrete casting and to identify barriers and facilitators of SCC usage. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 interviewees from the construction industry in Sweden. The answers were analysed from a human–technology–organisation (HTO) perspective in order to identify barriers and facilitators for a broader usage of SCC. The results indicate that knowledge about SCC is low within the Swedish construction industry, including educational institutions; when SCC is chosen, it is chosen exclusively due to its technical characteristics, and not because it eliminates vibrations. Barriers to a broader usage of SCC comprise an incomplete knowledge base, clients who never choose it, recipes that are said to be too demanding, and workplace traditions. Facilitators comprise large companies investing in knowledge development about SCC and engaged persons promoting it. This study used an HTO-based model (BTOH) to identify barriers and facilitators for a broader usage of SCC, thus contributing to a deeper understanding of reasons for the low usage of SCC and ways of increasing it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2024
Keywords
construction workers, hand–arm vibration, qualitative, self-compacting concrete
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-349922 (URN)10.3390/inventions9030050 (DOI)001255782700001 ()2-s2.0-85196891820 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240705

Available from: 2024-07-03 Created: 2024-07-03 Last updated: 2024-07-05Bibliographically approved
Dahlgren, G., Liv, P., Ohberg, F., Jarvholm, L. S., Forsman, M. & Rehn, B. (2023). Correlations between Ratings and Technical Measurements in Hand-Intensive Work. Bioengineering, 10(7), Article ID 867.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlations between Ratings and Technical Measurements in Hand-Intensive Work
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2023 (English)In: Bioengineering, E-ISSN 2306-5354, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 867Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An accurate rating of hand activity and force is essential in risk assessment and for the effective prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. However, it is unclear whether the subjective ratings of workers and observers correlate to corresponding objective technical measures of exposure. Fifty-nine workers were video recorded while performing a hand-intensive work task at their workplace. Self-ratings of hand activity level (HAL) and force (Borg CR10) using the Hand Activity Threshold Limit Value(& REG;) were assessed. Four ergonomist observers, in two pairs, also rated the hand activity and force level for each worker from video recordings. Wrist angular velocity was measured using inertial movement units. Muscle activity in the forearm muscles flexor carpi radialis (FCR) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) was measured with electromyography root mean square values (RMS) and normalized to maximal voluntary electrical activation (MVE). Kendall's tau-b correlations were statistically significant between self-rated hand activity and wrist angular velocity at the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles (0.26, 0.31, and 0.23) and for the ratings of observers (0.32, 0.41, and 0.34). Significant correlations for force measures were found only for observer-ratings in five of eight measures (FCR 50th percentile 0.29, time > 10%MVE 0.43, time > 30%MVE 0.44, time < 5% -0.47) and ECR (time > 30%MVE 0.26). The higher magnitude of correlation for observer-ratings suggests that they may be preferred to the self-ratings of workers. When possible, objective technical measures of wrist angular velocity and muscle activity should be preferred to subjective ratings when assessing risks of work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2023
Keywords
ergonomics, humans, musculoskeletal disorders, upper extremity, wrist, hand, occupational health, risk, exposure, rating, psychophysics, hand intensity, inertial measurement units, electromyography
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-333776 (URN)10.3390/bioengineering10070867 (DOI)001034881300001 ()37508893 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166303077 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230810

Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2023-08-10Bibliographically approved
Lind, C. M., De Clercq, B., Forsman, M., Grootaers, A., Verbrugghe, M., Van Dyck, L. & Yang, L. (2023). Effectiveness and usability of real-time vibrotactile feedback training to reduce postural exposure in real manual sorting work. Ergonomics, 66(2), 198-216
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness and usability of real-time vibrotactile feedback training to reduce postural exposure in real manual sorting work
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2023 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 198-216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vibrotactile feedback training may be used as a complementary strategy to reduce time in demanding postures in manual handling. This study evaluated the short- and medium-term effects of concurrent posture-correction vibrotactile feedback training on trunk inclination exposure in real manual sorting work. Fifteen warehouse workers completed the training and the follow-up sessions. Trunk inclination angles were recorded using the ambulatory Smart Workwear System. Questionnaires were used for assessing system usability, perceived physical exertion, and work ability. The results showed reduced time in trunk inclination >30°, >45°, and >60°, and reductions in the 90th, 95th, and 99th percentile trunk inclination angles, when receiving feedback and immediately after feedback withdrawal. No significant reduction was retained after one and three weeks. The wearer's comfort was scored high, and the feedback did not increase the perceived cognitive demands. No significant effects attributed to changed trunk inclination exposure were observed for perceived physical exertion or work ability. The training program has the potential of contributing to reduced trunk inclination exposure in the short term. Future studies are needed to evaluate if improvements in the feedback training can transfer the short-term results to retained median- and long-term effects. Practitioner summary: A two-day training program with concurrent posture-correction vibrotactile feedback can contribute to reduced exposure of trunk inclination in real manual sorting work in the short term. More research is needed on how to design the feedback training programs in order to be effective in the long term. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa UK Limited, 2023
Keywords
augmented feedback, Intervention, posture correction, the Smart Workwear System, work technique training, Personnel training, Surveys, Manual sorting, Short term, Trunk inclination, Vibro-tactile feedbacks, Workwear, Curricula, article, body position, comfort, exercise, follow up, human, human experiment, physician, questionnaire, training, trunk, usability, worker, feedback system, Feedback, Humans, Posture, Surveys and Questionnaires
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-324963 (URN)10.1080/00140139.2022.2069869 (DOI)000791116100001 ()35466852 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85132678409 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230322

Available from: 2023-03-22 Created: 2023-03-22 Last updated: 2023-03-22Bibliographically approved
Fan, X., Yang, L., Young, N., Kaner, I., Kjellman, M. & Forsman, M. (2023). Ergonomics and performance of using prismatic loupes in simulated surgical tasks among surgeons – a randomized controlled, cross-over trial. Frontiers In Public Health, 11, Article ID 1257365.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ergonomics and performance of using prismatic loupes in simulated surgical tasks among surgeons – a randomized controlled, cross-over trial
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, article id 1257365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Recently developed prismatic loupes may mitigate the high physical workload and risk of neck disorders associated with traditional surgical loupes among surgeons. However, research in this area, particularly among surgeons, is sparse. This study examines the impact of prismatic loupes on surgeons’ physical workload, musculoskeletal discomfort, and performance during simulated surgical tasks. Materials and methods: Nineteen out of twenty recruited surgeons performed three tasks in a fixed-order with their own loupes and both low-tilt (LT) and high-tilt (HT) prismatic loupes, in a randomized order. The primary outcomes were the median inclination angles and velocities of the head, trunk, and upper arms, along with the median muscle activity of the cervical erector spinae (CES), upper trapezius (UT), and lumbar erector spinae (LES) for each pair of loupes. The secondary outcomes included performance (completion time and errors), perceived body-part discomfort, and subjective evaluation of the three pairs of loupes. Results: Using prismatic loupes, either LT or HT, compared with the surgeons’ own loupes yielded lower head inclinations (all p < 0.001), lower neck muscle activity (all p < 0.05), and lower neck discomfort in indirect comparisons (p < 0.01) with no significant difference in surgical errors (p = 0.628). However, HT loupes resulted in a longer task completion time in two tasks (p < 0.001). Most surgeons preferred LT loupes (N = 12) for their comfort and visual functions. Discussion: The results indicate that prismatic loupes can reduce physical workload in the neck during simulated surgical task, with no significant difference in surgical errors. Future studies are needed to investigate the long-term effects of prismatic loupes among surgeons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media SA, 2023
Keywords
electromyography, inertial measurement unit, intervention, prismatic loupes, surgical ergonomics, workload assessment
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-342834 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2023.1257365 (DOI)38264242 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182831017 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240206

Available from: 2024-01-31 Created: 2024-01-31 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved
Olofsson Hallén, K., Forsman, M. & Eriksson, A. (2023). Interactions between Human, Technology and Organization in Building Information Modelling (BIM) - A scoping review of critical factors for the individual user. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 97, Article ID 103480.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions between Human, Technology and Organization in Building Information Modelling (BIM) - A scoping review of critical factors for the individual user
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 97, article id 103480Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a process, often mentioned as an enabler of various benefits within Architecture – Engineering – Construction (AEC), of creating and managing information for a built asset. Despite the potential benefits associated with BIM, the use seems to have been relatively inefficient. One explanation may be the lack of system perspective in the implementation and use of BIM. The aim of this study was to map critical factors influencing the use of BIM based on existing research, including interactions among the three subsystems human, technology and organization. A scoping review was performed analyzing 46 included articles. The results showed that BIM is a holistic and social system, that the technology itself is insufficient, and that the acceptance of BIM is a significant critical factor for its efficient implementation and use. The research on how humans interact with the technology of BIM, and how the organization can facilitate those interactions, is however limited. Relevance to industry: Learnings from this study include that the AEC industry, by approaching BIM as a holistic and social system and recognizing the role of the individual user, can add another piece of the puzzle to achieving the effective use of BIM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2023
Keywords
Architecture, Construction (AEC), Engineering, Literature review, Technology acceptance
National Category
Construction Management Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-333965 (URN)10.1016/j.ergon.2023.103480 (DOI)001045459500001 ()2-s2.0-85164269171 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230817

Available from: 2023-08-17 Created: 2023-08-17 Last updated: 2023-08-24Bibliographically approved
Nyman, T., Rhén, I.-M., Johansson, P. J., Eliasson, K., Kjellberg, K., Lindberg, P., . . . Forsman, M. (2023). Reliability and Validity of Six Selected Observational Methods for Risk Assessment of Hand Intensive and Repetitive Work. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(8), 5505-5505
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reliability and Validity of Six Selected Observational Methods for Risk Assessment of Hand Intensive and Repetitive Work
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 5505-5505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Risk assessments of hand-intensive and repetitive work are commonly done using observational methods, and it is important that the methods are reliable and valid. However, comparisons of the reliability and validity of methods are hampered by differences in studies, e.g., regarding the background and competence of the observers, the complexity of the observed work tasks and the statistical methodology. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate six risk assessment methods, concerning inter- and intra-observer reliability and concurrent validity, using the same methodological design and statistical parameters in the analyses. Twelve experienced ergonomists were recruited to perform risk assessments of ten video-recorded work tasks twice, and consensus assessments for the concurrent validity were carried out by three experts. All methods’ total-risk linearly weighted kappa values for inter-observer reliability (when all tasks were set to the same duration) were lower than 0.5 (0.15–0.45). Moreover, the concurrent validity values were in the same range with regards to total-risk linearly weighted kappa (0.31–0.54). Although these levels are often considered as being fair to substantial, they denote agreements lower than 50% when the expected agreement by chance has been compensated for. Hence, the risk of misclassification is substantial. The intra-observer reliability was only somewhat higher (0.16–0.58). Regarding the methods ART (Assessment of repetitive tasks of the upper limbs) and HARM (Hand Arm Risk Assessment Method), it is worth noting that the work task duration has a high impact in the risk level calculation, which needs to be taken into account in studies of reliability. This study indicates that when experienced ergonomists use systematic methods, the reliability is low. As seen in other studies, especially assessments of hand/wrist postures were difficult to rate. In light of these results, complementing observational risk assessments with technical methods should be considered, especially when evaluating the effects of ergonomic interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2023
Keywords
ergonomics; repetitive work; hand intensive; risk assessment; observation; reliability
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326815 (URN)10.3390/ijerph20085505 (DOI)2-s2.0-85153935302 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 1212-1202
Note

QC 20230516

Available from: 2023-05-11 Created: 2023-05-11 Last updated: 2024-03-18Bibliographically approved
Lind, C. M., Abtahi, F. & Forsman, M. (2023). Wearable Motion Capture Devices for the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Ergonomics-An Overview of Current Applications, Challenges, and Future Opportunities. Sensors, 23(9), Article ID 4259.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wearable Motion Capture Devices for the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Ergonomics-An Overview of Current Applications, Challenges, and Future Opportunities
2023 (English)In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 23, no 9, article id 4259Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are a major contributor to disability worldwide and substantial societal costs. The use of wearable motion capture instruments has a role in preventing WMSDs by contributing to improvements in exposure and risk assessment and potentially improved effectiveness in work technique training. Given the versatile potential for wearables, this article aims to provide an overview of their application related to the prevention of WMSDs of the trunk and upper limbs and discusses challenges for the technology to support prevention measures and future opportunities, including future research needs. The relevant literature was identified from a screening of recent systematic literature reviews and overviews, and more recent studies were identified by a literature search using the Web of Science platform. Wearable technology enables continuous measurements of multiple body segments of superior accuracy and precision compared to observational tools. The technology also enables real-time visualization of exposures, automatic analyses, and real-time feedback to the user. While miniaturization and improved usability and wearability can expand the use also to more occupational settings and increase use among occupational safety and health practitioners, several fundamental challenges remain to be resolved. The future opportunities of increased usage of wearable motion capture devices for the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders may require more international collaborations for creating common standards for measurements, analyses, and exposure metrics, which can be related to epidemiologically based risk categories for work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2023
Keywords
technical measurements, technical measurement instruments, upper limb posture, inertial measurement units, work technique training, ambulatory sensor systems, vibrotactile feedback, biomechanical exposure, biomechanical risk assessment, physical workload
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-328787 (URN)10.3390/s23094259 (DOI)000988116900001 ()37177463 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159314086 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230613

Available from: 2023-06-13 Created: 2023-06-13 Last updated: 2023-06-13Bibliographically approved
Dong, Y., Jiang, P., Jin, X., Jiang, N., Huang, W., Peng, Y., . . . Yang, L. (2022). Association between long-term static postures exposure and musculoskeletal disorders among university employees: A viewpoint of inflammatory pathways. Frontiers In Public Health, 10, Article ID 1055374.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between long-term static postures exposure and musculoskeletal disorders among university employees: A viewpoint of inflammatory pathways
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 10, article id 1055374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundMusculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are critical occupational and social problems. With the improvement of production mechanization and automation, and the widespread application of computers, more occupations are exposed to static postures and load. This study explored the role of inflammation in the association between static postures exposure and MSDs. MethodsThis study adopted a prospective nested case-control design in which 66 lower back MSDs cases and 66 healthy controls were selected from a cohort study of university employees. The personal information, postural load, musculoskeletal symptoms, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), and inflammatory cytokines were collected. Logistic and linear regressions were used to investigate the association among postural load, inflammatory cytokines, and lower back MSDs. Mediation analysis was used to calculate the mediation effect. ResultsThe results of logistic and linear regressions showed that postural load and inflammatory cytokines were positively associated with lower back MSDs (P < 0.05), and postural load was positively associated with inflammatory cytokines (P < 0.05). Further, mediation analysis showed that the mediation effect of postural load on the lower back MSDs through TNF-alpha was 0.073 (95%CI: 0.025-0.128), and the mediation effect of posture load on the lower back MSDs through IL-6 was 0.098 (95%CI: 0.041-0.179), respectively. ConclusionStatic postures were associated with the occurrence of MSDs through inflammatory cytokines, and low-level inflammation may be a critical early event in the generation of MSDs. This study may help bridge the gap of potential mechanisms linking static postures to increased risks of MSDs, and provide new evidence for targeted protection against the global increasing MSDs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2022
Keywords
musculoskeletal disorders, lower back pain, inflammatory cytokine, static postures, nested case-control study, university employees
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-322890 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2022.1055374 (DOI)000897188300001 ()36530652 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144027141 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 202201111

Available from: 2023-01-11 Created: 2023-01-11 Last updated: 2023-01-11Bibliographically approved
Forsman, M., Fan, X., Rhen, I.-M. & Lind, C. (2022). Concerning a Work Movement Velocity Action Level Proposed in "Action Levels for the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Neck and Upper Extremities: A Proposal" by Inger Arvidsson et al. (2021) [Letter to the editor]. ANNALS OF WORK EXPOSURES AND HEALTH, 66(1), 130-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concerning a Work Movement Velocity Action Level Proposed in "Action Levels for the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Neck and Upper Extremities: A Proposal" by Inger Arvidsson et al. (2021)
2022 (English)In: ANNALS OF WORK EXPOSURES AND HEALTH, ISSN 2398-7308, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 130-131Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press (OUP), 2022
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-309798 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxab075 (DOI)000743314400015 ()34469509 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85123648332 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220315

Available from: 2022-03-15 Created: 2022-03-15 Last updated: 2023-03-02Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5777-4232

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